List of places of worship in Crawley

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The borough of Crawley, in West Sussex, England, has 43 churches, chapels and other buildings used specifically for worship. Other religious communities meet in community centres, schools and other buildings whose primary function is secular. Three other former places of worship are no longer used by their original congregation, although only one of these has fallen out of use entirely. The borough covers the New Town of Crawley, whose development began in the late 1940s, and Gatwick Airport—an international airport which has two multi-faith chapels of its own. The New Town absorbed three villages with a long history of Christian worship, and later extensions to the boundary have brought other churches into the borough.

Crawley has a majority Christian population, but it has a much larger proportion of Muslim and Hindu residents than England overall. There are two Hindu temples and a Hindu centre (Swaminarayan Manor), a Sikh gurdwara and three mosques. A Quaker meeting house in the Ifield area is one of the oldest in the world.

Several churches have listed status in view of their architectural and historical importance, but most places of worship date from the postwar era when the New Town was developed, and are of modest architectural merit: Nikolaus Pevsner stated in 1965 that those built up to that time were "either entirely uneventful or more often mannered and contorted, with odd spikes and curvy roofs".[1]

History and development

Most of the borough's 44.97 km2 (17.36 sq mi)[2] area is covered by Crawley New Town. The area around the villages of Three Bridges, Crawley and Ifield was selected by the British Government as the site for one of the developments proposed in the New Towns Act 1946.[3] The Government set up a Development Corporation, headed by Sir Thomas Bennett, to coordinate the work. Anthony Minoprio designed the plans, and building work started in the late 1940s and continued until the late 1980s.[4] The New Town consisted of self-contained neighbourhoods, each of which had at least one Anglican church. The Development Corporation's intention was for one to be placed at the centre of each neighbourhood, and for churches of other Christian denominations to occupy sites where they could serve a larger area covering several neighbourhoods. This plan was followed as far as practicable.[5] The Corporation provided the freehold of the land on which churches were built at 25% of the price that applied for residential land use.[6]

Two mosques were established in the town in the mid-1980s,[7] and the Ahmadiyya community founded a third in the former Elim Pentecostal church in Langley Green in 2012.[8] A Gurjar Hindu community became established in Crawley in 1968 and opened a mandir (temple) and community centre in a building in West Green in 1998.[9][10] A new temple in the Ifield area was expected to open in December 2009,[11][12] but construction was delayed and it opened on 23 May 2010. It is the largest such temple in South East England, at 230 m2 (2,500 sq ft), and also has a 1,216 m2 (13,090 sq ft) community centre, offices, gardens and sports facilities.[13][14] There is no synagogue in Crawley, although a small Jewish community—followers of the Liberal Judaism—meet regularly.[15] Planning permission for a synagogue had been granted in 1964, but it was never built.[7] There is a small Sikh gurdwara in West Green; in January 2009 planning permission was granted for its demolition and replacement with a larger two-storey structure, but as of 2017 no work has started.[16]

The old villages of Three Bridges, Crawley and Ifield lay within the ancient parishes of Crawley and Ifield. Both of their 13th-century parish churches are still used for Anglican worship. Expansion of the borough's boundary has brought more churches into Crawley, including the early 11th-century church at Worth—formerly an isolated Wealden village at the centre of its own large parish.[17] Ifield was a centre of Nonconformism in the 17th century:[18] its Friends Meeting House was built in 1676, when more than 25% of the village's residents were Dissenters.[19]

Listed status

English Heritage has awarded listed status to seven church buildings in the district. A building is defined as "listed" when it is placed on a statutory register of buildings of "special architectural or historic interest" in accordance with the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990.[20] The Department for Culture, Media and Sport, a Government department, is responsible for this; English Heritage, a non-departmental public body, acts as an agency of the department to administer the process and advise the department on relevant issues.[21] There are three grades of listing status. Grade I, the highest, is defined as being of "exceptional interest"; Grade II* is used for "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and Grade II, the lowest, is used for buildings of "special interest".[22] As of February 2001, there were three Grade I-listed buildings, 12 with Grade II* status and 80 Grade II-listed buildings in the borough of Crawley.[23] Additionally, Crawley Borough Council grants locally listed building status to buildings which have historical or architectural interest at a local level, but which are not of sufficient quality to merit listing at a national level. As of November 2010, five churches in the borough were on the local list.[24]

Grade Criteria[22][25]
Grade I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important.
Grade II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest.
Grade II Buildings of national importance and special interest.
Locally listed (L) Buildings considered by the Council to be "an important part of [the local] heritage due to [their] architectural, historic or archaeological significance".

Religious affiliation in Crawley

According to the 2001 United Kingdom Census, 99,744 people lived in Crawley. Of these, 67.3% identified themselves as Christian, 4.4% were Muslim, 3.4% were Hindu, 0.7% were Sikh, 0.2% were Buddhist, 0.1% were Jewish, 0.3% followed another religion, 16.8% claimed no religious affiliation and 6.8% did not state their religion. The proportion of Christians is lower than the 71.7% in England as a whole, whereas there are more Muslims and Hindus in Crawley than in England overall: 3.1% of people in England are Muslim, and 1.1% are Hindu.[26]

Current places of worship

Name Image Area/
Coordinates
Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
Broadfield Islamic Centre and Mosque Broadfield Islamic Centre and Mosque, Broadwood Rise, Broadfield (September 2014) (3).JPG Broadfield
51°05′51″N 0°12′49″W / 51.0975°N 0.2136°W / 51.0975; -0.2136 (Broadfield Islamic Centre and Mosque, Broadfield)
Muslim (Sunni) A house in Broadfield had been used as a mosque since the early 1980s. An Islamic community centre, incorporating the new Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque, was built in 1994. Also known as Crawley Mosque, it follows the Sunni tradition of Islam. [7][10]
[27][28]
ChristChurch Gateway Church International, Southgate, Crawley 02.JPG Southgate
51°06′29″N 0°11′05″W / 51.1081°N 0.1847°W / 51.1081; -0.1847 (ChristChurch, Southgate)
Non-denominational The building houses an independent Christian congregation which is associated with New Covenant Ministries International. Originally opened in 1957 as Southgate Hall, a Plymouth Brethren meeting room, it became the Brewer Road Evangelical Church in the 1980s. Its registration under this name was cancelled in July 2008. A later identity was Gateway Church International. [29][30]
[31][32]
[33]
Christ the Lord Church Christ the Lord Church, Coachmans Drive, Broadfield (September 2014).JPG Broadfield
51°05′50″N 0°12′11″W / 51.0972°N 0.2031°W / 51.0972; -0.2031 (Christ the Lord Church, Broadfield)
Anglican,
Roman Catholic,
Evangelical
The brick building of polygonal design, built between 1980 and 1981 as an integral part of the new Broadfield neighbourhood's community centre, is a combined church and community centre shared by the Broadfield Christian Fellowship (an Evangelical congregation), Anglicans and Roman Catholics. The Anglican community is included in the parish of Southgate under St Mary's Church. [6][10]
[34][35]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Crawley (Jan 2013).JPG Southgate
51°06′33″N 0°12′03″W / 51.1092°N 0.2008°W / 51.1092; -0.2008 (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Southgate)
Latter-day Saint Sir Thomas Bennett, the principal architect of Crawley New Town, designed this chapel and its associated hall himself. It opened in 1964 and was registered for marriages in July of that year. [29][36]
[37]
Crawley Baptist Church Crawley Baptist Church, West Green, Crawley.JPG West Green
51°07′10″N 0°11′39″W / 51.1194°N 0.1942°W / 51.1194; -0.1942 (Crawley Baptist Church, West Green)
Baptist The first Baptist Church in Crawley was established in Station Road in 1883. It was severely damaged by a bomb during World War II, and new premises were built in the West Green neighbourhood in 1954. These were in turn demolished in 2002 to allow the present building to be constructed on the site; this was completed in 2003. [10][29]
[38][39]
Crawley Community Church Charis Centre (Crawley Community Church), West Green Drive, West Green (November 2014).JPG West Green
51°07′07″N 0°11′52″W / 51.1186°N 0.1977°W / 51.1186; -0.1977 (Crawley Community Church, West Green)
Charismatic This Charismatic church is part of the Newfrontiers movement. Its worship and pastoral centre was originally a former private house in Southgate, but the church now owns The Charis Centre in West Green—a combined church, community facility and conference venue. It was registered for marriages in August 2012. [40][41]
[42]
Crawley New Life Church Crawley New Life Church, Furnace Green, Crawley (October 2011).jpg Furnace Green
51°06′25″N 0°10′18″W / 51.1069°N 0.1717°W / 51.1069; -0.1717 (Crawley New Life Church, Furnace Green)
Assemblies of God This Pentecostalist church, which offers a weekly service on Sundays, is affiliated with the Assemblies of God denomination. It was built in 1981, before which the community used rooms in Crawley town centre. A certification for solemnising marriages was granted in May 1983. [29][43]
[44][45]
[46]
Crawley Spiritualist Church and Healing Centre Crawley Spiritualist Church, Gossops Green, Crawley (October 2011).jpg Gossops Green
51°06′37″N 0°12′57″W / 51.1102°N 0.2158°W / 51.1102; -0.2158 (Crawley Spiritualist Church and Healing Centre, Gossops Green)
Spiritualist A Spiritualist community emerged in Crawley in 1950. Worshippers used private houses, halls in West Green and the town centre, and (between 1965 and 1969) the now demolished Goffs Hall in Southgate. The present wooden church in Gossops Green was registered for marriages in April 1970. [29][47]
[48][49]
[50]
Crawley United Reformed Church Crawley United Reformed Church, Pound Hill, Crawley (Jan 2013).JPG Pound Hill
51°07′09″N 0°09′26″W / 51.1192°N 0.1572°W / 51.1192; -0.1572 (Crawley United Reformed Church, Pound Hill)
United Reformed Church L This was founded in 1955 as a Congregational church called Christ Church. Architects Lomas and Pooley designed the building, which opened in 1957. The Congregational and Presbyterian churches united in 1972 to form the United Reformed Church. In December 2010, Christ Church reformed under its present name when the congregation of Trinity Church in Ifield joined. [51][52]
[53][54]
Elim Church Crawley Elim Church Crawley, Ifield, Crawley (Jan 2013).JPG Ifield
51°07′18″N 0°12′21″W / 51.1217°N 0.2058°W / 51.1217; -0.2058 (Elim Church Crawley, Ifield)
Elim Pentecostal This community church moved to this building after the former United Reformed Church congregation for which it was built in 1963 moved to Pound Hill. Trinity United Reformed Church closed in December 2010 and was sold to the Elim Pentecostal Church, who left their old church in Langley Green. [53][55]
[19]
Green Fields Baptist Church Green Fields Baptist Church, Tilgate, Crawley (October 2011).jpg Tilgate
51°06′07″N 0°10′30″W / 51.1019°N 0.1750°W / 51.1019; -0.1750 (Green Fields Baptist Church, Tilgate)
Baptist Services were initially held in a temporary building on a site bought by the Baptist community in 1957. For a time during the 1960s the church was linked with the main Crawley Baptist Church in West Green. The present building dates from 1970, when it was registered for marriages under the name South Crawley Baptist Church. [50][56]
[29]
Holy Trinity Church Holy Trinity Church, Tilgate, Crawley (October 2011).jpg Tilgate
51°06′04″N 0°10′49″W / 51.1011°N 0.1803°W / 51.1011; -0.1803 (Holy Trinity Church, Tilgate)
Anglican Tilgate's Anglican church was built in 1959 and is included in the parish of Southgate under St Mary's Church. Two services are held every Sunday morning. [6][34]
[57]
Ifield Friends Meeting House Friends Meeting House, Ifield (IoE Code 363371).jpg Ifield
51°07′36″N 0°12′42″W / 51.1267°N 0.2117°W / 51.1267; -0.2117 (Ifield Friends Meeting House, Ifield)
Quaker I Built in 1676, the "lovable" ashlar-walled building is one of the oldest purpose-built Quaker places of worship. William Penn and Elizabeth Fry were associated with it in its early years. The roof is gabled and hipped, and an even older cottage is attached. The plain interior is characteristic of old Nonconformist chapels. [58][59]
[60]
Kingdom Hall Kingdom Hall, Barnfield Road, Northgate.JPG Northgate
51°07′14″N 0°10′54″W / 51.1206°N 0.1817°W / 51.1206; -0.1817 (Jehovah's Witness Kingdom Hall, Northgate)
Jehovah's Witnesses This opened in 1983 as one of three Kingdom Halls in Crawley. The others had been established in a room on The Broadway in the town centre in 1958 (this is no longer extant) and in Three Bridges in 1965. It was registered for marriages in 1991, and is used by the Broadfield and Ifield Congregations of Jehovah's Witnesses. [29][61]
[62]
Kingdom Hall Kingdom Hall (Three Bridges and Tilgate Congregations), Three Bridges Road, Three Bridges.JPG Three Bridges
51°07′01″N 0°09′57″W / 51.1169°N 0.1658°W / 51.1169; -0.1658 (Jehovah's Witness Kingdom Hall, Three Bridges)
Jehovah's Witnesses First registered in May 1965, the Three Bridges neighbourhood's Kingdom Hall is the older of the two that remain in Crawley. It is used by the Three Bridges and Tilgate Congregations of Jehovah's Witnesses. [29][63][64]
Langley Green Islamic Centre and Mosque Langley Green Islamic Centre and Mosque, Martyrs Avenue, Langley Green (September 2014) (2).JPG Langley Green
51°07′51″N 0°11′11″W / 51.1308°N 0.1864°W / 51.1308; -0.1864 (Langley Green Islamic Centre and Mosque)
Muslim (Sunni) The mosque, which follows the Sunni tradition, was founded in a converted house (link to picture) on the London Road near the County Oak industrial area in 1984. In 2008, members applied to redevelop the site and build a larger, purpose-built facility. The house was demolished, construction work started in 2012 and the "spectacular" new mosque opened on 8 June 2014. [7][65]
[66][67]
[68]
Maidenbower Baptist Church Maidenbower Baptist Church, Maidenbower Place, Maidenbower (November 2014).JPG Maidenbower
51°06′30″N 0°09′11″W / 51.1084°N 0.1531°W / 51.1084; -0.1531 (Maidenbower Baptist Church, Maidenbower)
Baptist A Baptist church plant was established in a disused chapel in the town centre in the 1970s. Redevelopment resulted in its closure, and the congregation moved to Crawley's newest neighbourhood, Maidenbower. The community centre was used between 1996 and 2001, when the present church was opened. [10][69]
Noor Ahmadiyya Mosque Noor Ahmadiyya Mosque, Langley Drive, Langley Green (September 2014) (2).JPG Langley Green
51°07′35″N 0°11′34″W / 51.1264°N 0.1927°W / 51.1264; -0.1927 (Ahmadiyya Mosque, Langley Green)
Muslim (Ahmadiyya) This building was bought by Crawley's Ahmadiyya community in April 2012 and has been reordered to form a mosque which will officially open in 2013. It was the first permanent church used by the Elim Pentecostal community of Crawley when it opened in 1971, but went out of use when the congregation moved to Ifield. [8][70]
Our Lady Queen of Heaven Church Church of Our Lady Queen of Heaven, Langley Green, Crawley (Jan 2013).JPG Langley Green
51°07′29″N 0°12′07″W / 51.1247°N 0.2019°W / 51.1247; -0.2019 (Our Lady Queen of Heaven Church, Langley Green)
Roman Catholic The brick and concrete church, registered for marriages in June 1958, is part of the Diocese of Arundel and Brighton's Crawley Parish, consisting of six churches in Crawley and a convent chapel in Copthorne. [71][72]
[73][74]
St Alban's Church St Alban's Church, Gossops Drive, Gossops Green (November 2014, from North-Northeast).JPG Gossops Green
51°06′38″N 0°13′03″W / 51.1106°N 0.2175°W / 51.1106; -0.2175 (St Alban's Church, Gossops Green)
Anglican L This brick building with a tall bell tower is part of the parish of Ifield under St Margaret's Church. It was designed by Thomas S. Ford and opened in 1962, although Anglican worship in the neighbourhood had begun four years earlier in a temporary building. [75][76]
[77][78]
St Andrew's Church St Andrew's Church, Furnace Green, Crawley (October 2011).jpg Furnace Green
51°06′29″N 0°10′07″W / 51.1081°N 0.1686°W / 51.1081; -0.1686 (St Andrew's Church, Furnace Green)
Anglican The original St Andrew's church was built between 1968 and 1969 and was part of the parish of Southgate under St Mary's Church. In 2009 the original church was demolished and replaced with a new building. [6][34]
St Barnabas' Church St Barnabas Church, Pound Hill, Crawley.jpg Pound Hill
51°07′05″N 0°09′17″W / 51.1181°N 0.1547°W / 51.1181; -0.1547 (St Barnabas Church, Pound Hill)
Anglican Built between 1956 and 1957, this large church is a brick structure with an attached hall. [6]
St Bernadette's Church St Bernadette's RC Church, Tilgate, Crawley (October 2011).jpg Tilgate
51°06′07″N 0°10′59″W / 51.1019°N 0.1831°W / 51.1019; -0.1831 (St Bernadette's Church, Tilgate)
Roman Catholic Built in 1962 and registered for marriages in May of that year, the church is in the Diocese of Arundel and Brighton's Crawley Parish, consisting of six churches in Crawley and a convent chapel in Copthorne. [71][72]
[79][80]
St Edward the Confessor's Church St Edward the Confessor RC Church, Pound Hill, Crawley.jpg Pound Hill
51°07′00″N 0°08′55″W / 51.1166°N 0.1485°W / 51.1166; -0.1485 (St Edward the Confessor Church, Pound Hill)
Roman Catholic L This church was constructed from reinforced concrete in 1965 to the design of Alexander Lane and has an integrated church hall. It is part of the Diocese of Arundel and Brighton's Crawley Parish, consisting of six churches in Crawley and a convent chapel in Copthorne. [71][72]
[81][82][83]
St Elizabeth's Church St Elizabeth's Church, Barnfield Road, Northgate.JPG Northgate
51°07′14″N 0°10′55″W / 51.1206°N 0.1819°W / 51.1206; -0.1819 (St Elizabeth's Church, Northgate)
Anglican Northgate's Anglican church was built in 1958 and enlarged in 1965. Since weekly services stopped in 2005, one Sunday service has been held per month, and the building is also used by The Louise Ryrie School of Dance and Drama. A Performing Arts Sunday school is held every week. [6][84]
[85][86]
St Francis and St Anthony's Church Friary Church of St Francis and St Anthony, Crawley.JPG Crawley Town Centre
51°06′48″N 0°11′16″W / 51.1133°N 0.1878°W / 51.1133; -0.1878 (St Francis and St Anthony's Church, Crawley)
Roman Catholic II Harry Stuart Goodhart-Rendel built this church on the site of a Capuchin Franciscan friary. Reordering and renovations took place in 1988 and 2008–09. The church is in the Diocese of Arundel and Brighton's Crawley Parish. [72][87]
[88][89]
[90][91]
[92]
St John the Baptist's Church St John the Baptist's Church, Crawley (October 2011).JPG Crawley Town Centre
51°06′51″N 0°11′20″W / 51.1141°N 0.1888°W / 51.1141; -0.1888 (St John the Baptist's Church, Crawley)
Anglican II* Crawley's parish church was originally a chapel of ease in the parish of St Mary's Church, Slaugham. It was first mentioned in this context in 1291, and some 13th-century fabric survives. The dedication was first recorded in 1408. Extensive restoration in 1879–80 by Henry Woodyer followed the building of the tower in 1807. [92][93]
[94][95]
St Margaret's Church St Margaret's Church, Ifield, Crawley (Jan 2013).JPG Ifield
51°07′26″N 0°13′10″W / 51.1239°N 0.2194°W / 51.1239; -0.2194 (St Margaret's Church, Ifield)
Anglican I Ifield's parish church was built in the 13th century on the site of a 10th-century church and was subsequently extended. Mark Lemon is buried in the extensive churchyard. The exterior is roughcast. The broach spire-topped tower dates from 1883 and has "perplex[ing] ... odd and very effective" details such as three tall lancet windows. [77][93]
[96][97]
[76]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Southgate, Crawley (Jan 2013).JPG Southgate
51°06′20″N 0°11′11″W / 51.1055°N 0.1865°W / 51.1055; -0.1865 (St Mary's Church, Southgate)
Anglican L Henry Braddock and D.F. Martin-Smith's 1958 building is designed so that the adjoining church hall can be used as an extension of the main church. The roof has a centrally-positioned flèche on top of a small, boxlike bell tower. One wall consists of concrete slabs pierced with decorative shards of blue glass. It became a parish church in 1959; the churches at Broadfield, Furnace Green and Tilgate are linked to it as part of a Team Ministry. [6][98]
[34][99]
St Mary Magdalene's Church (The Barn Church) St Mary Magdalene's Church (The Barn Church), Bewbush, Crawley (October 2011).jpg Bewbush
51°05′56″N 0°13′46″W / 51.0989°N 0.2294°W / 51.0989; -0.2294 (St Mary Magdalene Church, Bewbush)
Anglican II Part of the parish of Ifield, under St Margaret's Church, this is a small "barn church" with strong community involvement. The 17th-century building, part of the now vanished Bewbush Manor Farm, was converted into a church between 1989 and 1999 with support from the Heritage Lottery Fund. It was consecrated in July 1999. Services in Bewbush had begun before 1984 in another building. [77][100]
[101][102]
St Michael and All Angels Church (Horley Gatwick SDA Church) St Michael and All Angels Church, Lowfield Heath (now Horley Gatwick SDA Church).JPG Lowfield Heath
51°08′45″N 0°10′47″W / 51.1458°N 0.1797°W / 51.1458; -0.1797 (St Michael and All Angels Church, Lowfield Heath)
Seventh-day Adventist II* William Burges built this French Gothic Revival church in 1867 as the Anglican parish church of the village of Lowfield Heath. Boundary changes moved it from Surrey into the Borough of Crawley in 1974, but by then the village had been rendered uninhabitable by the expansion of Gatwick Airport. The Diocese of Chichester allowed the Seventh-day Adventist Church to take over the building in 2008. [103][104]
[105][106]
[107]
St Nicholas' Church (Worth Church) St Nicholas Church, Worth, Crawley.JPG Worth
51°06′37″N 0°08′30″W / 51.1103°N 0.1416°W / 51.1103; -0.1416 (St Nicholas Church, Worth)
Anglican I The parish church of Worth is now within the Borough of Crawley. It is of Saxon origin (probably 11th-century); Nikolaus Pevsner called it "one of the most powerful of Anglo-Saxon churches". It was extended in the 13th century and restored in 1871 (by Anthony Salvin, who added the tower) and 1986. [108][109]
[110][111]
[112][113]
[114]
St Paul's Methodist Church St Paul's Methodist Church, Northgate, Crawley (March 2010).JPG Northgate
51°07′13″N 0°10′49″W / 51.1203°N 0.1803°W / 51.1203; -0.1803 (St Paul's Methodist Church, Northgate)
Methodist The present church was built to a polygonal brick design in 1966, and replaced an adjacent building of 1953 which then became the church hall. [10][29]
[115]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, West Green, Crawley (October 2011).jpg West Green
51°06′54″N 0°11′44″W / 51.1150°N 0.1956°W / 51.1150; -0.1956 (St Peter's Church, West Green)
Anglican L This large church was designed between 1892 and 1893 by W. Hilton Nash and built by Richard Cook, owner of a large building firm in the town. It replaced a nearby chapel of ease to St Margaret's Church. The Gothic Revival building has a bellcote and sandstone walls. [98][116]
[117][118]
St Richard of Chichester's Church St Richard's Church, Gales Drive, Three Bridges.JPG Three Bridges
51°07′03″N 0°10′25″W / 51.1175°N 0.1736°W / 51.1175; -0.1736 (St Richard of Chichester's Church, Three Bridges)
Anglican The first St Richard of Chichester's Church was built in 1952 by N.F. Cachemaille-Day and Partners. It was found to be structurally unsound, declared redundant as from 1 January 1994 and demolished. In November 1993, Crawley Borough Council granted planning permission for a new church on a nearby site, which was completed in 1995. [10][98]
[119][120]
[121]
St Theodore of Canterbury's Church St Theodore of Canterbury RC Church, Gossops Green, Crawley (October 2011).jpg Gossops Green
51°06′47″N 0°12′49″W / 51.1131°N 0.2136°W / 51.1131; -0.2136 (St Theodore of Canterbury's Church, Gossops Green)
Roman Catholic Built in 1971, the church has a brick exterior and a timber internal structure with cruck framing.[71] It is part of the Diocese of Arundel and Brighton's Crawley Parish. An earlier chapel with this dedication was registered for marriages in May 1960. [72][122]
[123]
Sanatan Mandir Gurjar Hindu Temple, Apple Tree Centre, Ifield, Crawley (October 2011).jpg Ifield
51°07′48″N 0°12′39″W / 51.1300°N 0.2109°W / 51.1300; -0.2109 (Sanatan Mandir Hindu Temple, Ifield)
Hindu This temple replaces the Gurjar Hindu Union's building in West Green. Work at Apple Tree Farm, a 8.5-acre (3.4 ha) site on the Ifield/Langley Green border, began in May 2008. Planning permission was temporarily withdrawn, but work restarted in 2009 and continued until May 2010, when the temple opened. It was registered for marriages in October 2012. [9][14]
[124]
Siri Guru Singh Sabha Gurdwara Siri Guru Singh Sabha Gurdwara, West Green, Crawley (October 2011).JPG West Green
51°06′49″N 0°11′38″W / 51.1136°N 0.1939°W / 51.1136; -0.1939 (Siri Guru Singh Sabha Gurdwara, West Green)
Sikh Crawley's Sikh community meet in a single-storey structure built in 1982 and registered for marriages in November 1988. Up to 250 worshippers regularly attend from a wide area: the temple serves Sikhs across a 25-mile (40 km) radius. Crawley Borough Council has granted permission for the building to be demolished and replaced with a new temple. [10][16]
[125][126]
Sri Swarna Kamadchy Amman Temple Three Bridges
51°06′49″N 0°09′59″W / 51.1136°N 0.1664°W / 51.1136; -0.1664 (Sri Swarna Kamadchy Amman Temple, Three Bridges)
Hindu This Hindu temple is based on the Stephenson Way industrial estate. Its founder was Swami Sri Suntharesa Kurukal. [127]
Swaminarayan Manor Gatwick Swaminarayan Gatwick Manor Hindu Temple, Bonnetts Lane, Crawley (October 2011).jpg Langley Green
51°08′09″N 0°12′35″W / 51.1358°N 0.2098°W / 51.1358; -0.2098 (Swaminarayan Manor, Langley Green)
Hindu This Swaminarayan Hindu centre opened in 2006 on Bonnetts Lane near Ifield village. It was converted from a hotel, and accommodation is still provided on site. [128][129]
The Meeting Room Brethren Meeting Room, Povey Cross Road, Povey Cross.JPG Povey Cross
51°09′58″N 0°10′54″W / 51.1660°N 0.1817°W / 51.1660; -0.1817 (The Meeting Room, Povey Cross)
Plymouth Brethren A small building was registered for worship under this name on Povey Cross Road near Horley. It is just on the West Sussex side of the Surrey county boundary. Planning permission for its construction was granted in October 1999. [130][131]
[132][133]
Three Bridges Free Church Three Bridges Free Church, Haslett Avenue East, Three Bridges.JPG Three Bridges
51°07′01″N 0°09′53″W / 51.1169°N 0.1647°W / 51.1169; -0.1647 (Three Bridges Free Church, Three Bridges)
Evangelical This church was built in 1963 on land purchased in 1958 to replace the nearby Worth Mission Hall, which was built in 1876 and extended in 1884. It was registered for marriages in March 1963. [29][134]
[135][136]
Three Bridges Spiritualist Church and Psychic Centre Three Bridges Spiritualist Church and Psychic Centre, New Street, Three Bridges.JPG Three Bridges
51°07′05″N 0°09′54″W / 51.1180°N 0.1650°W / 51.1180; -0.1650 (Three Bridges Spiritualist Church, Three Bridges)
Spiritualist When the former Worth Mission Hall was vacated by Three Bridges Free Church, who had built a new church nearby, a Spiritualist community took over the building. They re-registered it for worship (originally as New Town Psychic Centre) in 1966. [29][135]
[137]
Voice of Deliverance Full Gospel Church of God Voice of Deliverance Full Gospel Church of God (formerly St Leonard's Anglican Church), Langley Drive, Langley Green (September 2014) (3).JPG Langley Green
51°07′40″N 0°11′50″W / 51.1278°N 0.1972°W / 51.1278; -0.1972 (Voice of Deliverance Full Gospel Church of God, Langley Green)
Pentecostalist Soon after St Leonard's Anglican church closed, a Pentecostalist group with a mostly Mauritian and Diego Garcian congregation acquired it and converted it into a church. Previously they worshipped in the adjacent church hall. The first service took place on 29 March 2014. [138]

Former places of worship

Name Image Area/
Coordinates
Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
Elim Church Elim Pentecostal Church, Langley Green, Crawley.jpg Langley Green
51°07′35″N 0°11′34″W / 51.1264°N 0.1927°W / 51.1264; -0.1927 (Elim Church Crawley, Langley Green (former))
Elim Pentecostal This was the first permanent church used by the Elim Pentecostal community of Crawley. Opened in 1971, it served until 2011 when the community moved into the former Trinity United Reformed Church in Ifield. It was then sold and became the Ahmadiyya mosque. [8][29]
[55][139]
St Leonard's Church St Leonard's Church, Langley Green, Crawley.jpg Langley Green
51°07′40″N 0°11′50″W / 51.1278°N 0.1972°W / 51.1278; -0.1972 (St Leonard's Church, Langley Green (former))
Anglican Langley Green's Anglican church, built of brick in 1954–55, was latterly is in the parish of Ifield under St Margaret's Church. Falling congregations and a high maintenance bill forced it to close in 2013; the remaining congregation joined other Anglican churches. The last service was on 29 December 2013. [75][77]
[140]
Salvation Army Citadel Former Salvation Army Citadel, Spencers Road, West Green, Crawley.JPG West Green
51°06′50″N 0°11′43″W / 51.1139°N 0.1953°W / 51.1139; -0.1953 (Salvation Army Citadel, West Green (former))
Salvation Army The Salvation Army opened and registered this place of worship at 51 Spencers Road in 1902. It was still in use in 1985, but after that the building was sold and worship moved to the community centre in Ifield Drive, Ifield (under the name Crawley Outreach Centre). Its worship certification was cancelled in October 2003, and later uses included a furniture warehouse. [19][141]
[142][143]
Sanatan Mandir Sanatan Mandir, West Green, Crawley.jpg West Green
51°06′49″N 0°11′46″W / 51.1136°N 0.1961°W / 51.1136; -0.1961 (Sanatan Mandir Hindu Temple, West Green (former))
Hindu The Gurjar Hindu Union of Crawley, established in 1968, moved to this small temple and community centre in 1997. The community started building a new temple and community centre at a site in Ifield in 2008, and moved to it upon its completion in 2010. [9][10]
[14]
Trinity Church Trinity URC, Ifield, Crawley.JPG Ifield
51°07′18″N 0°12′21″W / 51.1217°N 0.2058°W / 51.1217; -0.2058 (Trinity United Reformed Church, Ifield (former))
United Reformed Church The church had its origins in the Trinity Congregational church, built in Robinson Road in 1863. The Gothic Revival building was demolished in 1962 and this new church was provided the following year in Ifield Drive. It closed in December 2010 and the congregation moved to Christ Church at Pound Hill, which was reformed as Crawley United Reformed Church. [144][53]
[145]

Communities with no dedicated building

Northgate Community Centre is home to the non-denominational Solution International Christian Centre.

There are several communities in Crawley that do not worship at a building used solely for religious purposes. The non-denominational Crawley Family Church uses Waterfield Primary School,[146][147] which opened in 1985 in Bewbush.[148] Also in Bewbush, an Elim Pentecostal congregation meets weekly at Bewbush Community Primary School; regular prayer meetings, study groups and other social activities take place elsewhere in the neighbourhood. The congregation was established in May 2005.[146][149] This church is associated with the Elim church in Langley Green.[10] The Crawley Gatwick Church of Christ, an independent, non-denominational congregation formed in 1996, meets at the community centre in Gossops Green.[146][150] The Salvation Army established a barracks in 1902 in West Green,[144] but the Crawley branch is now based in Ifield: worship takes place at the neighbourhood's community centre.[10][146] The Kingdom Faith church, affiliated with a group of churches based in nearby Horsham, meets at Oriel High School in the Maidenbower neighbourhood and at Roffey Place, just over the borough boundary at Faygate.[10][146] In 2006, a Pentecostalist community founded the Exodus Pentecostal Church, which worships at Tree House—Crawley's ancient manor house,[151] now owned by the Borough Council.[152] The weekly services cater especially for residents from Diego Garcia and Mauritius.[10] Also in the town centre, the Potter's House Church uses the church hall of St John the Baptist's Church.[146] It is part of the London Fellowship of Potter's House Christian Fellowship churches.[153] The Solution International Christian Centre, a non-denominational fellowship founded in January 2009, is based at Northgate Community Centre.[146][154] The Vine Christian Fellowship meets in a hotel in Southgate and holds joint services in the New Life and Green Fields Baptist churches.[146][155] The Powerhouse Revival Centre meets for worship at the community centre on Ifield Drive in the Ifield neighbourhood.[146][156]

Gatwick Airport

One of London's international airports, Gatwick Airport, was moved into the Borough of Crawley in 1974.[104] A year earlier, a multi-faith chaplaincy had been established in the terminal building (now the South Terminal).[157][158] The chaplaincy is coordinated by the Anglican minister, whose licence was renewed in November 2008.[157] Roman Catholic and Free Church ministers are also on site. When the North Terminal was built, a similar chapel was provided there.[159] Both chapels are open at all times for prayer and meditation, and offer regular services throughout the week.[158]

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 204.
  2. ^ "Area: Crawley (Local Authority) – Population Density (UV02)". 2001 UK Census statistics for Crawley. Office for National Statistics. 18 November 2004. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  3. ^ "Select Committee on Transport, Local Government and the Regions: Appendices to the Minutes of Evidence. Supplementary memorandum by Crawley Borough Council (NT 15(a))". The Information Policy Division, Office of Public Sector Information. 2002. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  4. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Crawley New Town". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 74–75. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  5. ^ Goepel 1980, p. 11.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Crawley New Town: Churches". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 91–92. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Crawley New Town: Other Religions". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 93. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  8. ^ a b c "Langley Green church converts to new mosque". Crawley News/thisiscrawley.co.uk website. East Surrey & Sussex News and Media Ltd. 18 April 2012. Archived from the original on 29 January 2013. Retrieved 29 January 2013. 
  9. ^ a b c "History of GHU – The Journey". Gurjar Hindu Union (Apple Tree Centre). 2012. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Faith, Belief & Culture Guide" (PDF). Crawley Borough Council Faith, Belief and Culture Guide. Crawley Borough Council and Crawley Interfaith Network. October 2008. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 January 2013. Retrieved 29 January 2013. 
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  50. ^ a b "No. 45081". The London Gazette. 16 April 1970. p. 4321. 
  51. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 66009; Name: Christ Church (United Reformed); Address: Worth Park Avenue, Pound Hill, Crawley; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 20 December 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  56. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 72093; Name: Green Fields Baptist Church; Address: Ashdown Drive, Tilgate, Crawley; Denomination: Baptists). Retrieved 20 December 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  58. ^ Historic England. "Friends' Meeting House, Langley Lane  (Grade I) (1298879)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 January 2013. 
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  134. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 69440; Name: Three Bridges Free Church; Address: Three Bridges Road, Three Bridges, Crawley; Denomination: Christians not otherwise designated). Retrieved 20 December 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  136. ^ "No. 42955". The London Gazette. 29 March 1963. p. 2860. 
  137. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 70667; Name: Newtown Psychic Centre (Spiritualist Church); Address: 10 New Street, Three Bridges, Crawley; Denomination: Spiritualists). Retrieved 20 December 2012. (Archived version of list)
  138. ^ Ballinger, Chris (29 March 2014). "Crawley church to reopen with new Mauritian congregation". Crawley News. Local World. Retrieved 9 September 2014. 
  139. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 72711; Name: Elim Pentecostal Church; Address: Langley Drive, Langley Green, Crawley; Denomination: Elim Foursquare Gospel Alliance). Retrieved 20 December 2012. (Archived version of list)
  140. ^ Ballinger, Chris (26 January 2014). "Crawley church with ageing congregation forced to close". Crawley News. Local World. Retrieved 9 September 2014. 
  141. ^ "Crawley". The Salvation Army United Kingdom with the Republic of Ireland (London South East Division). 2013. Archived from the original on 2 March 2013. Retrieved 2 March 2013. 
  142. ^ "No. 55296". The London Gazette. 30 October 1998. p. 11847. 
  143. ^ "No. 57078". The London Gazette. 8 October 2003. p. 12419. 
  144. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Ifield – Protestant Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 71–72. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  145. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 69084; Name: Trinity United Reformed Church; Address: Ifield Drive, Ifield, Crawley; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 20 December 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  147. ^ "Bewbush". Crawley Borough Council. 18 December 2012. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  148. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Ifield – Education". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 73–74. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  149. ^ "Information". Elim Church Bewbush. 21 July 2012. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  150. ^ "About Us: Crawley Gatwick Church of Christ". Crawley Gatwick Church of Christ. 2013. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  151. ^ Gwynne 1990, p. 57.
  152. ^ Gwynne 1990, p. 165.
  153. ^ "London Fellowship Churches". The Potter's House Christian Fellowship Centre Walthamstow. 2013. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  154. ^ "History of the Church". Solution International Christian Centre. 2013. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  155. ^ "Where and what to find us doing". The Vine Christian Fellowship. 2013. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  156. ^ "Powerhouse Revival Centre". Powerhouse Revival Centre. 2013. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  157. ^ a b "Church of England commits to London Gatwick Airport". Gatwick Airport Ltd. 21 November 2008. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  158. ^ a b "Chapel & prayer room". Gatwick Airport Ltd. 2013. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  159. ^ "Chapel & prayer room". Gatwick Airport Ltd. 2013. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 

Bibliography

  • Crawley Borough Council (November 2010). Crawley Local Building List (PDF) (Report). Crawley Borough Council. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  • Goepel, J. (1980). Development of Crawley. Crawley: Crawley Borough Council. 
  • Goldsmith, Michael (1987). Crawley and District in Old Picture Postcards. Zaltbommel: European Library. ISBN 90-288-4525-9. 
  • Gwynne, Peter (1990). A History of Crawley (1st ed.). Chichester: Phillimore & Co. ISBN 0-85033-718-6. 
  • Nairn, Ian; Pevsner, Nikolaus (1965). The Buildings of England: Sussex. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. ISBN 0-14-071028-0. 

External links

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