List of Billboard number-one country songs of 1957

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Two young men wearing long coats, holding bunches of flowers, standing either side of a woman in traditional Dutch clothing
The Everly Brothers took the songs "Bye Bye Love" and "Wake Up Little Susie" to number one on both the best sellers and jockeys charts.

In 1957 Billboard magazine published three charts covering the best-performing country music songs in the United States: Most Played C&W in Juke Boxes, which had appeared in Billboard since 1944, C&W Best Sellers in Stores, which had debuted in 1948, and Most Played C&W by Jockeys, which had launched in 1949. The "C&W" used in the titles of the charts was an abbreviation for "country and western", a term which Billboard had adopted for the genre in 1949, replacing the earlier "folk music".[1] The Juke Box chart was published for the final time in the issue of Billboard dated June 17, 1957. All three charts are considered part of the lineage of the current Hot Country Songs chart, which was first published in 1958.[2]

At the start of the year, the number one position on all three charts was held by "Singing the Blues" by Marty Robbins, who achieved a second number one in June with "A White Sport Coat (And A Pink Carnation)", which also topped all three charts and was in the top spot on the final C&W juke box chart published by Billboard. Robbins was the only artist with more than one chart-topper on the juke box listing, and his eleven weeks in the top spot was the most by any artist on the chart. Three other acts had more than one country number one in 1957. Bobby Helms took both "Fraulein" and "My Special Angel" to the top of both the best sellers and jockeys charts, a feat also achieved by The Everly Brothers with "Bye Bye Love" and "Wake Up Little Susie". Elvis Presley was the only act with three country number ones during the year; he reached number one on the juke box chart in May with "All Shook Up" and later in the year topped the best sellers chart with "Teddy Bear" and "Jailhouse Rock". Despite their success on the other charts, none of Presley's songs topped the jockeys chart. Four songs topped only the jockeys chart, including "Four Walls" by Jim Reeves, which spent eight non-consecutive weeks atop the airplay-based listing beginning in May, but failed to top either of the other two charts.

Sonny James achieved his first number one in 1957 with "Young Love", which also topped the pop singles charts. The singer, dubbed the "Southern Gentleman", would go on to become one of the most successful artists in country music history, with more than 20 number ones to his name.[3][4] Rock and roll pioneer Jerry Lee Lewis, whose early recordings were successful on the country charts, reached number one for the first time in September with "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On",[5] which was also a rhythm and blues number one.[6] The song has been included on lists of the greatest tracks of all time,[7] and in 2015 was selected for permanent preservation in the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress.[8] The Everly Brothers also topped the country charts for the first time, with "Bye Bye Love",[9] and returned to the top spot later in the year with "Wake Up Little Susie", which also topped Billboard's pop and R&B charts.[10] The brothers had the highest total number of weeks atop both the country best sellers and jockeys charts, with 14 and 15 weeks respectively at number one. "Gone" by Ferlin Husky had the longest unbroken run at number one on any of the charts, topping the best sellers chart for ten consecutive weeks. The final number one of the year on both the best sellers and jockeys charts was "My Special Angel" by Bobby Helms.

Chart history

Most Played C&W in Juke Boxes

A smiling, dark-haired man wearing a cardigan sweater
Marty Robbins had the final number one on the juke box chart.
Issue date Title Artist(s) Ref.
January 5 "Singing the Blues" Marty Robbins [11]
January 12 [12]
January 19 [13]
January 26 [14]
February 2 [15]
February 9 [16]
February 16 "Young Love" Sonny James [17]
February 23 [18]
March 2 "There You Go" Johnny Cash [19]
March 9 [20]
March 16 "Young Love" Sonny James [21]
March 23 [22]
March 30 "There You Go" Johnny Cash [23]
April 6 [24]
April 13 [25]
April 20 "Gone" Ferlin Husky [26]
April 27 [27]
April 29[a] [28]
May 6 [29]
May 13 "All Shook Up" Elvis Presley [30]
May 20[b] "Gone" Ferlin Husky [31]
May 20[b] "A White Sport Coat (And A Pink Carnation)" Marty Robbins
May 27 [32]
June 3 [33]
June 10 [34]
June 17 [35]

C&W Best Sellers in Stores

A dark-haired man smiling slightly while leaning on a guitar
Ferlin Husky had the longest-running number one on the best sellers chart.
Issue date Title Artist(s) Ref.
January 5 "Singing the Blues" Marty Robbins [11]
January 12 [12]
January 19 [13]
January 26 [14]
February 2 [15]
February 9 [16]
February 16 "Young Love" Sonny James [17]
February 23 [18]
March 2 [19]
March 9 [20]
March 16 [21]
March 23 [22]
March 30 [23]
April 6 "Gone" Ferlin Husky [24]
April 13 [25]
April 20 [26]
April 27 [27]
April 29[a] [28]
May 6 [29]
May 13 [30]
May 20 [31]
May 27 [32]
June 3 [33]
June 10 "A White Sport Coat (And A Pink Carnation)" Marty Robbins [34]
June 17 [35]
June 24 [36]
July 1 [37]
July 8 [38]
July 15 "Bye Bye Love" The Everly Brothers [39]
July 22 [40]
July 29 [41]
August 5 "Teddy Bear" Elvis Presley [42]
August 12 "Bye Bye Love" The Everly Brothers [43]
August 19
August 26 [44]
September 2 [45]
September 9 "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" Jerry Lee Lewis [46]
September 16 [47]
September 23 "Fraulein" Bobby Helms [48]
September 30 [49]
October 7 [50]
October 14 "Wake Up Little Susie" The Everly Brothers [51]
October 21 [52]
October 28
November 4 [10]
November 11 [53]
November 18 [54]
November 25 [55]
December 2 "Jailhouse Rock" Elvis Presley [56]
December 9 "My Special Angel" Bobby Helms [57]
December 16 [58]
December 23 [59]
December 30 [60]

Most Played C&W by Jockeys

A dark-haired man smiling wearing a white jacket, smiling broadly and holding one hand to his chin
Bobby Helms had two chart-toppers in 1957 and ended the year at number one on both the best sellers and jockeys charts.
Issue date Title Artist(s) Ref.
January 5 "Singing the Blues" Marty Robbins [11]
January 12 [12]
January 19 [13]
January 26 [14]
February 2 "Young Love" Sonny James [15]
February 9 [16]
February 16 "Singing the Blues" Marty Robbins [17]
February 23 "Young Love" Sonny James [18]
March 2 [19]
March 9 [20]
March 16 [21]
March 23 [22]
March 30 [23]
April 6 "Gone" Ferlin Husky [24]
April 13 [25]
April 20 [26]
April 27 [27]
April 29[a] [28]
May 6 [29]
May 13 [30]
May 20[b] [31]
May 20[b] "Honky Tonk Song" Webb Pierce
May 27[b] "Gone" Ferlin Husky [32]
May 27[b] "Four Walls" Jim Reeves
June 3 "A White Sport Coat (And A Pink Carnation)" Marty Robbins [33]
June 10 "Four Walls" Jim Reeves [34]
June 17 [35]
June 24 [36]
July 1 [37]
July 8 [38]
July 15 [39]
July 22 [40]
July 29 "Bye Bye Love" The Everly Brothers [41]
August 5 [42]
August 12 [43]
August 19
August 26 [44]
September 2 [45]
September 9 [46]
September 16 "Fraulein" Bobby Helms [47]
September 23 [48]
September 30 "My Shoes Keep Walking Back to You" Ray Price [49]
October 7 "Fraulein" Bobby Helms [50]
October 14 [51]
October 21 "My Shoes Keep Walking Back to You" Ray Price [52]
October 28 "Wake Up Little Susie" The Everly Brothers
November 4 [10]
November 11 [53]
November 18 [54]
November 25 [55]
December 2 [56]
December 9 [57]
December 16 "My Shoes Keep Walking Back to You" Ray Price [58]
December 23 "Wake Up Little Susie" The Everly Brothers [59]
December 30 "My Special Angel" Bobby Helms [60]

a. ^ Due to a change in Billboard's cover-dating policy, the issue after that dated April 27 was dated April 29.
b. ^ Two songs tied for number one.

See also

References

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1996). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Country Hits. Watson-Guptill. p. 8. ISBN 0823076326.
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2005). Joel Whitburn's Top Country Songs: 1944-2005. Record Research. p. ix. ISBN 9780898201659.
  3. ^ Bush, John. "Sonny James Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved July 20, 2018.
  4. ^ Betts, Stephen L. (February 22, 2016). "'Young Love' Singer Sonny James Dead at 87". Rolling Stone. Retrieved July 20, 2018.
  5. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1996). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Country Hits. Watson-Guptill. p. 184. ISBN 0823076326.
  6. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942–2004. Record Research. p. 347.
  7. ^ "500 Greatest Songs of All Time". Rolling Stone. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  8. ^ "Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On'". Sound on Sound. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  9. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1996). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Country Hits. Watson-Guptill. p. 105. ISBN 0823076326.
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  39. ^ a b "Country & Western Records". Billboard. July 15, 1957. Retrieved July 25, 2018.
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  41. ^ a b "Country & Western Records". Billboard. July 29, 1957. Retrieved July 25, 2018.
  42. ^ a b "Country & Western Records". Billboard. August 5, 1957. Retrieved July 25, 2018.
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  59. ^ a b "Country & Western Records". Billboard. December 23, 1957. Retrieved July 27, 2018.
  60. ^ a b "Country & Western Records". Billboard. December 30, 1957. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
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