List of international cricket five-wicket hauls by Graham McKenzie

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In cricket, a five-wicket haul (also known as a "five–for" or "fifer")[1] refers to a bowler taking five or more wickets in a single innings. This is regarded as a notable achievement,[2] and as of August 2014 only 23 bowlers have taken at least 20 five-wicket hauls at international level in their cricketing careers.[3]

Graham Douglas McKenzie (born 24 June 1941) is an Australian cricketer who played for Western Australia (1960–74), Leicestershire (1969–75), Transvaal (1979–80) and Australia (1961-71) and was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1965. He succeeded Alan Davidson as Australia's premier fast bowler and was in turn succeeded by Dennis Lillee, playing with both at either end of his career. McKenzie was particularly noted for his muscular physique (hence his nickname) and ability to take wickets on good batting tracks. His father Eric McKenzie and uncle Douglas McKenzie played cricket for Western Australia and Garth was chosen for the Ashes tour of England in 1961 aged only 19. He made his debut in the Second Test at Lord's cricket ground, where his 5/37 (including the last three wickets in 12 balls) wrapped up the England innings to give Australia a 5 wicket victory.[4]

1964 saw McKenzie’s made his second Ashes tour of England. He led the attack as Australia retained the Ashes. His 29 wickets in five Tests equalled the highest obtained for Australia in England by Clarrie Grimmett in 1930. He took 21 wickets when Australia visited India and Pakistan on the return journey to Australia. Another seven wickets in a one off Test against Pakistan in Melbourne in December established a new record for the number of Test wickets in the space of one year; from 11 December 1963 to 8 December 1964 he took 73 wickets in fifteen Tests. This surpassed Maurice Tate's 65 wickets in 1924–25. In this period, he became the youngest bowler to reach 100 wickets, at the age of 23 and 162 days, 139 days younger than A.L. Valentine. He was named as one of the Wisden Cricketers of the Year in 1965, the first Western Australian born recipient.[5]

He toured South Africa in 1966–67 and in 1967–68 was dropped for the final two Tests after taking his only ten wicket match haul against India.

In 1968, McKenzie became a full-time cricketer, believing that it would offer him the best chance of financial security. At the time the Australian Cricket Board regarded its players as amateurs and paid them accordingly. McKenzie joined Leicestershire, captained until 1968 by the Western Australian skipper and former England Test stalwart Tony Lock. He took over four hundred wickets for the county and was instrumental in its four One Day Cricket trophies in the early 1970s and winning their first County Championship in 1975.[6]

In 1968-69 he took 30 wickets (25.26) against the visiting West Indies and at 27 became the youngest man to take 200 Test wickets, a record since beaten. Another 21 wickets (21.00) came on the Indian tour of 1968-69, but when the Australian team proceeded to South Africa his form slumped (1/333 in four Tests) and they were whitewashed. It led to suspicions that he had contracted hepatitis. He played in the first four Tests of the 1970-71 Ashes series against England, taking 4/66 in the Second Test at Perth, the first played at the WACA Ground and 2-22 in the first ever One Day International at Melbourne. In the Fourth Test at Sydney McKenzie retired hurt after being hit in the face by a bouncer from John Snow as the England fast bowler took 7-40 in England's 299 run victory.[7] He recovered sufficiently to break Geoff Boycott's forearm in a tour match just before the vital Seventh Test,[8] but was not recalled and was left stranded on 246 Test wickets, two short of Richie Benaud's Australian record. He was only 29 years old.

In his 60 Tests McKenzie took 5 wickets in an innings 16 times, and 10 in a match three times.[9] McKenzie only played one One Day International, the first ODI against England in 1971, in which he took 2/22.[10]

Key

Symbol Meaning
Date Date the match was held, or starting date of the match for Test matches
Inn The innings of the match in which the five-wicket haul was taken
Overs Number of overs bowled in that innings
Runs Runs conceded
Wkts Number of wickets taken
Batsmen The batsmen whose wickets were taken in the five-wicket haul
Econ Bowling economy rate (average runs per over)
Result The result for Australia in that match
* One of two five-wicket hauls by McKenzie in a match
dagger 10 wickets or more taken in the match

Test five-wicket hauls

Five-wicket hauls in Test cricket by Graham McKenzie
No. Date Ground Against Inn Overs Runs Wkts Econ Batsmen Result
1 22 June 1961 Lord's, London  England 3 29.0 37 5 1.27 Won[4]
2 25 January 1963 Adelaide Oval, Adelaide  England 2 35.0 89 5 2.02 Drawn[11]
3 4 June 1964 Trent Bridge, Headingley  England 3 24.0 53 5 2.20 Drawn[12]
4 23 July 1964 Old Trafford, Manchester  England 2 60.0 153 7 2.55 Drawn[13]
5 2 October 1964dagger Corporation Stadium, Madras  India 2 32.3 58 6 1.78 Won[14]
6 24 October 1964 National Stadium, Karachi  Pakistan 1 30.0 69 6 2.30 Drawn[15]
7 14 May 1965 Queen's Park Oval, Port of Spain  West Indies 3 17.0 33 5 1.94 Won[16]
8 30 December 1965 Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne  England 2 35.2 134 5 2.85 Drawn[17]
9 28 January 1966 Adelaide Oval, Adelaide  England 1 21.7 48 6 1.64 Won[18]
10 23 December 1966 New Wanderers Stadium, Johannesburg  South Africa 1 21.5 46 5 2.10 Lost[19]
11 31 December 1966 Newlands, Cape Town  South Africa 2 33.0 65 5 1.96 Won[20]
12 24 February 1967 St George's Park, Port Elizabeth  South Africa 2 35.0 65 5 1.85 Lost[21]
13 30 December 1967dagger Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne  India 1 21.4 66 7 2.30 Won[22]
14 26 December 1968dagger Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne  West Indies 1 28.0 71 8 1.90 Won[23]
15 4 November 1969 Brabourne Stadium, Bombay  India 1 29.0 69 5 2.37 Won[24]
16 12 December 1969 Eden Gardens, Calcutta  India 1 33.4 67 6 1.99 Won[25]

Test ten-wicket hauls

Ten-wicket hauls in Test cricket by Graham McKenzie
No. Figures Match Venue City Opponent Year Result
1 10/91 19 Corporation Stadium Madras  India 1964-65 Won[14]
2 10/151 39 Melbourne Cricket Ground Melbourne  India 1967-68 Won[22]
3 10/159 46 Melbourne Cricket Ground Melbourne  West Indies 1968-69 Won[23]

References

  1. ^ "Swinging it for the Auld Enemy – An interview with Ryan Sidebottom". The Scotsman. 17 August 2008. Retrieved 23 October 2013. ... I'd rather take fifers (five wickets) for England ... 
  2. ^ Pervez, M. A. (2001). A Dictionary of Cricket. Orient Blackswan. p. 31. ISBN 978-81-7370-184-9. Retrieved 23 October 2013. 
  3. ^ "Records / Combined Test, ODI and T20I records / Bowling records / Most five-wickets-in-an-innings in a career". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 16 October 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "2nd Test: Australia v England at Lord's, 22-26 June 1961". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2014. 
  5. ^ "Cricketer of the Year 1965 - Graham McKenzie". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2014. 
  6. ^ "Cricket Archive - Garth McKenzie". Cricket Archive. Retrieved 5 November 2014. 
  7. ^ p101, John Snow, Cricket Rebel, Hamlyn, 1976
  8. ^ p104, John Snow, Cricket Rebel, Hamlyn, 1976
  9. ^ "Bowling records / Tests / Graham McKenzie". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2014. 
  10. ^ "Only ODI: Australia v England at MCG, 5 January 1971". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2014. 
  11. ^ "4th Test: Australia v England at Adelaide, 25-30 January 1963". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2014. 
  12. ^ "1st Test: Australia v England at Trent Bridge, 4-9 June 1964". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2014. 
  13. ^ "4th Test: Australia v England at Old Trafford, 23-28 July 1964". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 November 2014. 
  14. ^ a b "1st Test: Australia v India at Madras, 2-7 October 1964". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 November 2014. 
  15. ^ "Only Test: Australia v Pakistan at Karachi, 24-29 October 1964". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 12 November 2014. 
  16. ^ "5th Test: Australia v West Indies at Port of Spain, 14-17 May 1965". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 12 November 2014. 
  17. ^ "2nd Test: Australia v England at Melbourne, 30 December 1965-4 January 1966". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 12 November 2014. 
  18. ^ "4th Test: Australia v England at Adelaide, 28 January-1 February 1966". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 12 November 2014. 
  19. ^ "1st Test: Australia v South Africa at Johannesburg, 23-28 December 1966". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
  20. ^ "2nd Test: Australia v South Africa at Cape Town, 31 December 1966-5 January 1967". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
  21. ^ "5th Test: Australia v South Africa at Port Elizabeth, 24-28 February 1967". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
  22. ^ a b "2nd Test: Australia v India at Melbourne, 30 December 1967-3 January 1968". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
  23. ^ a b "2nd Test: Australia v West Indies at Melbourne, 26-30 December 1968". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
  24. ^ "2nd Test: Australia v India at Bombay, 4-9 November 1969". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
  25. ^ "4th Test: Australia v India at Calcutta, 12-16 December 1969". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
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