List of former county courts in Wales

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A large stone building with 12 glazed arched windows at first floor level above six stone arches
Monmouth County Court was based in the Shire Hall until it closed in 2002.
A couple of market stalls with red and white striped awnings in front of a stone building with three arched windows above stone arches
Llandovery County Court was based in the Town Hall until it closed in 1976.

Sixty county courts in Wales have closed since the modern system of county courts in England and Wales was established by the County Courts Act 1846. The Act created 491 courts on 60 circuits; of these, 53 courts were in Wales and Monmouthshire, a Welsh county that had ambiguous status at the time and was sometimes treated as being in England. Since then, new courts have been opened in various locations, and 80 towns and cities in Wales have, or have had, county courts. As of 2012, there are 20 county courts in Wales. Reasons for closure have included a decision that it was "inexpedient" to continue to provide a court, the volume of business no longer justifying a court, or the state of the building housing the court. The first closure was Fishguard in 1856. The most recent closures are the county courts in Aberdare and Pontypool, which closed on 1 August 2011.

History

The modern system of county courts in England and Wales dates from the County Courts Act 1846, which received Royal Assent on 28 August 1846 and was brought into force on 15 March 1847. England and Wales (with the exception of the City of London, which was outside the scope of the Act) were divided into 60 circuits, with a total of 491 courts.[1] Four of these circuits were wholly in Wales, as were 46 of these courts. A further seven courts were located in Monmouthshire (which had at the time an ambiguous status and was sometimes treated as being part of England) and these seven courts were part of a circuit for Monmouthshire and Herefordshire.[2] One county court judge was appointed to each circuit, assisted by one or more registrars with some limited judicial powers, and would travel between the courts in his area as necessary, sitting in each court at least once a month. Few permanent courts were needed initially, given the infrequency of court hearings, and temporary accommodation such as a town hall would often be used where there was no existing courthouse for use.[3]

Over time, although new courts have been opened in various locations, there has been a reduction in the number of locations where a county court is held. In all, 80 towns and cities in Wales have held county courts since 1847; 60 have closed and, as of 2012, 20 county courts in Wales are still open. The most recent opening of a county court took place in Caerphilly in 1965, although this closed in 2000. The first county court to close was Fishguard, in 1856. The latest county courts to close in Wales were Aberdare and Pontypool in 2011. Newbridge was the location of a county court for the shortest period – for only five months in 1856. Blaenavon is the only town in Wales to have a county court close and then reopen, both events taking place in 1938.

Courts have been closed for various reasons. The county courts at Fishguard, Ruabon and Cowbridge were closed because it was considered "inexpedient" to continue to hold courts there.[4][5][6] In other cases, it was thought that it would be "of advantage to the public" to move the location of a court: the court at Pembroke was replaced by one at Pembroke Dock and the court at Newbridge was replaced by one at Pontypridd for this reason.[7][8] The volume of court business declined during the Second World War and some little-used courts, including Presteigne and Llandeilo, were closed as a result.[9]

There has been pressure to close courts for economic reasons since the 19th century. In 1872, more than 300 of the county courts in England and Wales cost more to run than they received in fees, but widespread closures were politically impossible.[10] In 1899, there were proposals to close courts where fewer than 20 claims were issued per year, but these plans were frustrated by local pressure to keep courts open, since having a county court in a town was generally regarded as a mark of the town's importance.[11] A review of the provision of county courts after the First World War concluded that Mid Wales had an "unjustifiably generous" number of county courts, but only one (Llangollen) was proposed for closure, given the need to maintain courts in rural areas.[12]

More recently, considerations in deciding whether to close a court have included "the costs and practical implications of running a court, the public facilities, waiting times, workload levels and the overall standard of service that can be made available over the area as a whole".[13] Monmouth, for example, was based in the Shire Hall until it was closed in 2002 because of the poor standard of the court accommodation, the lack of access for people with disabilities and the high cost to run the court compared with the use it received.[14] The Government estimated in March 2000 that the closure of 55 county courts in England and Wales (including 9 courts in Wales) in the previous 6 years had saved a minimum of £6 million, through reductions in rent and accommodation charges, running costs and judicial expense.[15]

In June 2010, the Ministry of Justice announced plans to close 54 county courts and 103 magistrates' courts in England and Wales, in order to save £15m in annual running costs and £22m in necessary maintenance. The courts threatened with closure in Wales were Aberdare, Llangefni, Pontypool and Rhyl. In addition, it was proposed that Newport County Court would no longer hold hearings at Chepstow every fortnight (as had been done since the county court there closed in 2002).[16][17] After consultation, it was decided to keep Llangefni County Court open, but the other closures were confirmed.[18]

Closed courts

Until 1 January 1937, the full title of each court was "The County Court of (county) holden at (location/locations)", using the historic county names. Thereafter, each court was renamed as "(location/s) County Court".[19] For brevity, the latter form is used throughout in this table, with "County Court" being abbreviated to "CC". All name changes in the table reflect changes in the locations where the court sat since, until 1 August 1983, a county court with more than one location in its title would sit at each location named.

Name of County Court Date of opening Date of closing Notes
Aberaeron 15 March 1847 1 January 1946[20]
Aberavon 1 July 1899[21] 1 July 1922[22] It was opened as part of Neath and Aberavon CC, and closed when the court became Neath and Port Talbot CC.[21][22]
Aberdare 31 May 1856 1 August 2011[23] It was opened to serve an area formerly within the district of Merthyr Tydfil CC.[24] It was renamed Aberdare and Mountain Ash CC on 3 August 1897.[25] The court was renamed Aberdare CC on 1 October 1953, when Mountain Ash CC closed.[26]
Abergavenny 15 March 1847 1 July 1976[27] It was renamed Abergavenny and Blaenavon CC on 1 July 1899, and renamed Abergavenny CC on 1 January 1938.[21][28] It was consolidated with Pontypool CC as part of Pontypool and Abergavenny CC on 1 October 1968.[29]
Abertillery 1 September 1919[30] 1 July 1976[27] It was opened as part of Tredegar and Abertillery CC, which became Tredegar, Abertillery and Bargoed CC on 1 January 1926.[30][31] It was renamed Tredegar, Blackwood, Abertillery and Bargoed CC on 24 January 1949, before being renamed Blackwood, Tredegar and Abertillery CC on 1 April 1953 when Bargoed CC was made a separate court.[32][33]
Ammanford 1 November 1918[34] 27 March 1997[35] It was opened as part of Carmarthen, Llandeilo and Ammanford CC, which was renamed Carmarthen and Ammanford CC on 1 March 1944.[34][36] It became a separate court on 1 April 1953.[33]
Bala 15 March 1847 1 April 1969[37] It was consolidated with Corwen CC on 1 August 1916 as Bala and Corwen CC.[38]
Bangor 15 March 1847 4 July 1994[39]
Bargoed 1 January 1926[31] 29 December 1995[40] It was consolidated on 24 January 1949 as part of Tredegar, Blackwood, Abertillery and Bargoed CC.[32] Bargoed CC was reconstituted as a separate court on 1 April 1953.[33]
Barry 15 March 1847 29 December 1995[40] It was consolidated with Cardiff CC on 26 September 1932 as Cardiff and Barry CC.[41] Barry CC was reconstituted as a separate court on 1 October 1959.[42]
Blaenau Ffestiniog 31 March 1883[43] 1 April 1969[37] It was opened as part of Porthmadog and Blaenau Ffestiniog CC.[43]
Blaenavon 1 July 1899[21]
1 June 1938[44]
1 January 1938[28]
1 June 1954[45]
It was opened as part of Abergavenny and Blaenavon CC.[21] It closed for five months in 1938 before reopening as part of Pontypool and Blaenavon CC.[28][44] Blaenavon CC was closed for the second time in 1954.[45]
Builth Wells 15 March 1847 1 August 1983[46]
Caerphilly 1 January 1965[47] 1 December 2000[48] The court was opened to serve an area previously within the district of Pontypridd and Ystradyfodwg CC.[47]
Cardigan 15 March 1847 29 December 1995[40]
Chepstow 15 March 1847 1 April 2002[49]
Colwyn Bay 2 August 1910[50] 1 July 1976[27] It was opened as part of Conwy, Llandudno and Colwyn Bay CC.[50] Since 1 July 1976, Conwy CC (later renamed Conwy and Colwyn CC) has sat in Colwyn Bay.[27]
Corwen 15 March 1847 1 April 1969[37] It was consolidated with Bala CC on 1 August 1916 as Bala and Corwen CC.[38]
Cowbridge 31 December 1858[51] 1 March 1876[6] The court was opened as part of Bridgend and Cowbridge CC.[51] It was closed as it was considered "inexpedient" to continue to hold a court in Cowbridge.[6]
Crickhowell 15 March 1847 12 August 1929[52]
Denbigh 15 March 1847 1 July 1976[27] It was consolidated with Ruthin CC as Denbigh and Ruthin CC on 1 April 1907.[53]
Dolgellau 15 March 1847 30 June 1989[54]
Fishguard 31 December 1848[55] 25 October 1856[4] It was pened as part of Haverfordwest and Fishguard CC.[55] Closed in 1856 as it was "inexpedient" to continue to hold a court In Fishguard.[4]
Flint 30 April 1862[56] 1 April 1953[33] Flint CC opened as part of Mold and Flint CC.[56] On 1 February 1927, Mold CC was made a separate court and Flint CC became part of Holywell and Flint CC.[57]
Hay-on-Wye 15 March 1847 1 July 1960[58]
Holyhead 31 December 1858[51] 1 July 1976[27] It was opened as part of Holyhead and Llangefni CC, which was renamed Holyhead, Llangefni and Menai Bridge CC on 30 September 1883.[51][59] It was renamed Llangefni, Holyhead and Menai Bridge CC on 1 January 1936, and then became Llangefni and Holyhead CC on 1 April 1969.[37][51]
Holywell 15 March 1847 7 September 1998[60] It was consolidated on 1 February 1927 as part of Holywell and Flint CC.[57] It was renamed Holywell CC on 1 April 1953, when Flint CC closed.[33]
Knighton 30 September 1851[61] 1 July 1976[27] Knighton CC opened to serve an area previously within the district of Presteigne CC.[61]
Lampeter 15 March 1847 5 December 1994[62]
Llandeilo 15 March 1847 1 March 1944[36] It was consolidated with Carmarthen CC and renamed Carmarthen, Llandeilo and Ammanford CC on 1 November 1918.[34]
Llandovery 15 March 1847 1 July 1976[27]
Llandrindod Wells 1 July 1898[63] 29 December 1995[40] It was opened as part of Rhayader and Llandrindod Wells CC.[63] The court was renamed Llandrindod Wells CC on 1 January 1920, when Rhayader CC closed.[64]
Llandudno 30 September 1878[65] 1 July 1976[27] It opened as part of Conwy and Llandudno CC.[65] The court was renamed Conwy, Llandudno and Colwyn Bay CC on 2 August 1910.[50]
Llanfyllin 15 March 1847 1 October 1958[42] It was consolidated on 1 December 1949 with Oswestry CC as Oswestry and Llanfyllin CC (a court district that straddled the border between England and Wales).[66]
Llangollen 30 September 1867[67] 1 January 1920[64] It opened as part of Wrexham and Llangollen CC.[67]
Llanidloes 15 March 1847 1 July 1970[68]
Llanrwst 15 March 1847 1 April 1969[37]
Machynlleth 15 March 1847 1 July 1976[27]
Menai Bridge 30 September 1883[59] 1 April 1969[37] It opened as part of Holyhead, Llangefni and Menai Bridge CC, which was renamed Llangefni, Holyhead and Menai Bridge CC on 1 January 1936.[59][69]
Monmouth 15 March 1847 1 April 2002[49] It was closed because the accommodation in the Shire Hall, Monmouth, was of an "extremely poor standard, expensive to maintain for the low level of business conducted and [was] not accessible by people with disabilities."[14]
Mountain Ash 3 August 1897[70] 1 October 1953[26] It opened as part of Aberdare and Mountain Ash CC.[70]
Narberth 15 March 1847 1 January 1957[71] It was consolidated as part of Pembroke Dock, Narberth and Haverfordwest CC on 1 July 1919.[72] The court was renamed Haverfordwest, Pembroke Dock and Narberth CC on 1 January 1936.[69]
Newbridge 31 May 1856[73] 31 October 1856[8] Newbridge CC opened to serve an area previously within the district of Merthyr Tydfil CC.[73] It was replaced a few months later by Pontypridd CC as it was decided that this would be "of advantage to the public".[8]
Newcastle Emlyn 15 March 1847 1 December 1947[74]
Newtown 15 March 1847 1 April 1984[75] Welshpool CC was renamed Welshpool and Newtown CC when Newtown CC was closed.[75]
Pembroke 15 March 1847 29 June 1872[7] It was replaced by Pembroke Dock CC as it was decided that this would be "of advantage to the public".[7]
Pembroke Dock 30 June 1872[7] 1 January 1957[71] The court replaced Pembroke CC.[7] It was consolidated as part of Pembroke Dock, Narberth and Haverfordwest CC on 1 July 1919.[72] Renamed Haverfordwest, Pembroke Dock and Narberth CC on 1 January 1936.[69]
Pontypool 15 March 1847 1 August 2011[23] It was renamed Pontypool and Blaenavon CC on 1 June 1938; Blaenavon had previously been part of Abergavenny and Blaenavon CC until 1 January 1938, when sittings in Blaenavon ceased.[28][44] It was renamed Pontypool CC on 1 June 1954, when Blaenavon CC closed.[45] It was consolidated as part of Pontypool and Abergavenny CC on 1 October 1968.[29] The court was renamed Pontypool CC on 1 July 1976, when Abergavenny CC closed.[27]
Port Talbot 1 July 1922[22] 1 August 1983[46] The court opened as part of Neath and Port Talbot CC (which is still open, but sitting only in Neath: the obligation for the court to sit in Port Talbot was removed in 1983).[22][46]
Porth 1 January 1896[76] 1 January 1960[77] It opened as part of Pontypridd, Ystradyfodwg and Porth CC.[76]
Porthmadog 15 March 1847 4 July 1994[39] The court was renamed Porthmadog and Blaenau Ffestiniog CC on 31 March 1883.[43] It was renamed Portmadog CC on 1 April 1969, when Blaenau Ffestiniog CC closed.[37]
Presteigne 15 March 1847 1 March 1941[78]
Pwllheli 15 March 1847 1 April 1969[37]
Rhayader 15 March 1847 1 January 1920[64] It was renamed Rhayader and Llandrindod Wells CC on 1 July 1898.[63] It closed in 1920 as use of the court was "inconsiderable".[79]
Ruabon 15 March 1847 19 February 1863[5] Ruabon CC was closed as it was considered "inexpedient" to continue to hold a court there.[5]
Ruthin 15 March 1847 1 July 1976[27] It was consolidated with Denbigh CC on 1 April 1907 as Denbigh and Ruthin CC.[53]
St Asaph 15 March 1847 31 December 1910[80] The court was renamed St Asaph and Rhyl CC on 2 February 1867.[81]
Tredegar 15 March 1847 1 July 1976[27] The court was renamed Tredegar and Abertillery CC on 1 September 1919, and became Tredegar, Abertillery and Bargoed CC on 1 January 1926.[30][31] The court was renamed Tredegar, Blackwood, Abertillery and Bargoed CC on 24 January 1949, becoming Blackwood, Tredegar and Abertillery CC on 1 April 1953 when Bargoed CC was made a separate court.[32][33]
Usk 15 March 1847 1 April 1920[82]
Ystradyfodwg 30 November 1886[83] 1 January 1973[84] The court ropened as part of Pontypridd and Ystradyfodwg CC.[83] It was renamed Pontypridd, Ystradyfodwg and Porth CC on 1 January 1896.[76] It became Pontypridd and Ystradyfodwg CC on 1 January 1960, when Porth CC closed.[77]

See also

References

General
Specific
  • Save where references are given to publication in the London Gazette, the Statutory Instruments listed below were published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office and the date that the Order was made is given. Statutory Instruments from 1987 onwards are available online.
  1. ^ Polden, page 38
  2. ^ "The new judges under the Small Debts Act". The Times archive (subscription access). 29 March 1847. p. 8. Retrieved 21 January 2008. 
  3. ^ Polden, pages 38–39
  4. ^ a b c "No. 21934". The London Gazette. 24 October 1856. pp. 3462–3463. 
  5. ^ a b c "No. 22705". The London Gazette. 6 February 1863. p. 632. 
  6. ^ a b c "No. 24295". The London Gazette. 18 February 1876. p. 754. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "No. 23851". The London Gazette. 23 April 1872. pp. 1988–1989. 
  8. ^ a b c "No. 21934". The London Gazette. 24 October 1856. p. 3462. 
  9. ^ Polden, page 151
  10. ^ Polden, page 212
  11. ^ Polden, page 213
  12. ^ Polden, page 214
  13. ^ http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199798/cmhansrd/vo980706/text/80706w14.htm |chapter-url= missing title (help). Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Commons. 6 July 1998. col. 383. 
  14. ^ a b "'Please don't close our court'". South Wales Argus. 25 January 2002. Retrieved 29 January 2008. 
  15. ^ http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199900/cmhansrd/vo000307/text/00307w27.htm |chapter-url= missing title (help). Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Commons. 7 March 2000. col. 654W. 
  16. ^ Casciani, Dominic (23 June 2010). "Magistrates' courts face closure in England and Wales". BBC News Online. Retrieved 14 December 2010. 
  17. ^ "Proposal on the provision of courts services in Wales" (PDF). Ministry of Justice. 2010. p. 43. Retrieved 14 December 2010. 
  18. ^ "Coalition reveals list of 142 court closures". BBC News Online. 14 December 2010. Retrieved 14 December 2010. 
  19. ^ The County Court Districts (Name of Court) Order 1936 (SI 1936/1131) (19 October 1936)
  20. ^ The County Court Districts (Lampeter and Aberayron) Order (SI 1945/1603) (14 December 1945)
  21. ^ a b c d e The County Courts (Districts) Order in Council 1899 (SI 1899/178) (7 March 1899)
  22. ^ a b c d "No. 32715". The London Gazette. 2 June 1922. p. 4225. 
  23. ^ a b "The Civil Courts (Amendment) Order 2011 (SI 2011/1465)". 10 June 2011. Retrieved 26 January 2012. 
  24. ^ "No. 21869". The London Gazette. 8 April 1856. pp. 1334–1335. 
  25. ^ "No. 26880". The London Gazette. 6 August 1897. p. 4397. 
  26. ^ a b The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) (No. 2) Order 1953 (SI 1953/1275) (10 August 1953)
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m The County Court Districts (Wales and Chester Circuit) Order 1976 (SI 1976/850) (27 May 1976)
  28. ^ a b c d The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) Order 1937 (SI 1937/1073) (22 November 1937)
  29. ^ a b The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) Order 1968 (SI 1968/1442) (6 September 1968)
  30. ^ a b c "No. 31449". The London Gazette. 11 July 1919. p. 8846. 
  31. ^ a b c The County Court Districts (Pontypool, Tredegar and Newport) Order 1925 (SI 1925/1248) (17 December 1925)
  32. ^ a b c The County Court Districts (Tredegar, Blackwood, Abertillery and Bargoed) Order 1949 (SI 1949/38) (13 January 1949)
  33. ^ a b c d e f The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) Order 1953 (SI 1953/433) (10 March 1953)
  34. ^ a b c "No. 30846". The London Gazette. 16 August 1918. p. 9573. 
  35. ^ "The Civil Courts (Amendment) Order 1997 (SI 1997/361)". 14 February 1997. Retrieved 13 September 2005. 
  36. ^ a b The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) Order 1944 (SI 1944/113) (31 January 1944)
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) Order 1969 (SI 1969/295) (5 March 1969)
  38. ^ a b Order in Council (SI 1916/552) (28 July 1916)
  39. ^ a b "The Civil Courts (Amendment No. 2) Order 1994 (SI 1994/1536)". 9 June 1994. Retrieved 26 January 2012. 
  40. ^ a b c d "The Civil Courts (Amendment) (No. 2) Order 1995 (SI 1995/3173)". 6 December 1995. Retrieved 13 September 2012. 
  41. ^ The County Court Districts (Cardiff and Barry) Order 1932 (SI 1932/709) (2 September 1932)
  42. ^ a b The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous No. 2) Order 1958 (SI 1958/1506) (9 September 1958)
  43. ^ a b c "No. 25199". The London Gazette. 16 February 1883. pp. 849–850. 
  44. ^ a b c The County Court (Districts) Order 1938 (SI 1938/470) (12 April 1938)
  45. ^ a b c The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) Order 1954 (SI 1954/565) (27 April 1954)
  46. ^ a b c The Civil Courts Order 1983 (SI 1983/713) (11 May 1983)
  47. ^ a b The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) Order 1964 (SI 1964/1977) (15 December 1964)
  48. ^ "The Civil Courts (Amendment No. 2) Order 2000 (SI 2000/2738)". 5 October 2000. Retrieved 24 October 2007. 
  49. ^ a b "The Civil Courts (Amendment) Order 2001 (SI 2001/4025)". 17 December 2001. Retrieved 13 September 2012. 
  50. ^ a b c "No. 28404". The London Gazette. 5 August 1910. p. 5666. 
  51. ^ a b c d e "No. 22202". The London Gazette. 19 November 1858. p. 4904. 
  52. ^ The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous No. 2) Order 1929 (SI 1929/590) (27 June 1929)
  53. ^ a b "No. 27995". The London Gazette. 15 February 1907. pp. 1063–1064. 
  54. ^ "The Civil Courts (Amendment No. 3) Order 1989 (SI 1989/914)". 22 May 1989. Retrieved 23 October 2007. 
  55. ^ a b "No. 20931". The London Gazette. 29 December 1848. pp. 4707–4708. 
  56. ^ a b "No. 22611". The London Gazette. 25 March 1862. p. 1603. 
  57. ^ a b The County Court Districts (Mold and Flint) Order 1927 (SI 1927/16) (13 January 1927)
  58. ^ The County Court Districts (Hay and Parish of Aston Sandford) Order, 1960 (SI 1960/882) (12 May 1960)
  59. ^ a b c "No. 25264". The London Gazette. 28 August 1883. pp. 4210–4211. 
  60. ^ "The Civil Courts (Amendment) Order 1998 (SI 1998/1880)". 31 July 1998. Retrieved 13 September 2012. 
  61. ^ a b "No. 21234". The London Gazette. 8 August 1851. p. 2033. 
  62. ^ "The Civil Courts (Amendment No. 4) Order 1994 (SI 1994/2893)". 14 November 1994. Retrieved 13 September 2012. 
  63. ^ a b c "No. 26953". The London Gazette. 1 April 1898. pp. 2085–2086. 
  64. ^ a b c "No. 31663". The London Gazette. 28 November 1919. p. 14671. 
  65. ^ a b "No. 24615". The London Gazette. 20 August 1878. p. 4700. 
  66. ^ The County Court Districts Order 1949 (SI 1949/23) (2 November 1949)
  67. ^ a b "No. 23268". The London Gazette. 28 June 1867. pp. 3615–3616. 
  68. ^ The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) Order 1970 (SI 1970/904) (12 June 1970)
  69. ^ a b c The County Court (Alteration of Names) Order 1935 (SI 1935/1203) (5 December 1935)
  70. ^ a b "No. 26880". The London Gazette. 6 August 1897. p. 4397. 
  71. ^ a b The County Court Districts (Haverfordwest) Order 1956 (SI 1956/1674) (24 October 1956)
  72. ^ a b "No. 31365". The London Gazette. 30 July 1919. p. 6646. 
  73. ^ a b "No. 21869". The London Gazette. 8 April 1856. pp. 1334–1335. 
  74. ^ The County Court Districts (Newcastle Emlyn) Order 1947 (SI 1947/2262) (8 October 1947)
  75. ^ a b The Civil Courts (Amendment) Order 1984 (SI 1984/297) (7 March 1984)
  76. ^ a b c "No. 26669". The London Gazette. 8 October 1895. p. 5506. 
  77. ^ a b The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) Order 1959 (SI 1959/1992) (23 November 1959)
  78. ^ The County Court Districts (Knighton) Order 1941 (SI 1941/176) (5 February 1941)
  79. ^ Polden, page 120
  80. ^ "No. 28435". The London Gazette. 8 November 1910. p. 7979. 
  81. ^ "No. 23216". The London Gazette. 5 February 1867. p. 617. 
  82. ^ "No. 31837". The London Gazette. 26 March 1920. p. 3646. 
  83. ^ a b "No. 25629". The London Gazette. 28 September 1886. p. 4726. 
  84. ^ The County Court Districts (Miscellaneous) Order 1972 (SI 1972/1941) (12 December 1972)
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