List of football clubs in England by competitive honours won

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Preston North End in 1888–89, the first Football League champions. They completed the season unbeaten and went on to complete a Double by winning the FA Cup

This page lists English association football clubs whose men's sides have won competitive honours run by official governing bodies. Friendly honours and matches organized between clubs are not included. The football associations FIFA and UEFA run international and European competitions; and The Football Association, and its mostly self-governing subsidiary bodies the English Football League and Premier League, runs national competitions. County Football Associations organise regional competitions, but all full list of their honours is not provided in this article.

The European governing body UEFA was founded in 1954, and created their first competition, the European Cup, the next year. It was expanded and renamed in 1992 as the UEFA Champions League. Liverpool hold the English record, with five wins.[1] Parallel to UEFA, various officials created the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup in 1955, but this competition was disbanded when UEFA created the replacement tournament the UEFA Cup in 1971, renamed the UEFA Europa League in 2009.[2] The UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, featuring the winners of national knockout competitions, was created in 1960 and discontinued in 1999, national cup winners enter the UEFA Cup since.[3] The winners of this competition played the European Cup winners in the UEFA Super Cup, starting in 1972 but was recognised by UEFA in 1973, which now features the winners of the Champions and Europa Leagues.[4] The UEFA Intertoto Cup, started in 1961 but was officially recognised in 1995, was then the fourth-tier UEFA competition, behind the Champions League, Cup Winners' Cup and UEFA Cup. It was discontinued in 2008, when the Europa League expanded its number of entrants.[5] UEFA and CONMEBOL also created an intercontinental competition in 1960 with the Intercontinental Cup, featuring representatives from both associations. In 2000, the international governing body FIFA created the FIFA Club World Cup and in 2004 the Intercontinental Cup was merged with it. Manchester United are the only English club to win either intercontinental competition, winning each once.[6][7]

England's first competition organised by a national body, the FA Cup, began in the 1871–72 season, making it one of the oldest football competitions in the world.[8][9] Arsenal hold the record number of wins, 13.[10] League football began in the next decade with the founding of The Football League in 1888–89. The name First Division was adopted in 1892, when The Football League gained a second division. The First Division remained the highest division of the English football league system until 1992, when the Premier League was founded. Manchester United have won the most top division titles, with 20.[11] The English equivalent of the super cup began in 1898 with the inauguration of the Sheriff of London Charity Shield, pitting the best professional and amateur sides of the year against each other.[12] The trophy would develop into the FA Charity Shield in 1908, which was later renamed the FA Community Shield in 2002. The Football League created its own knockout competition in 1960, the League Cup.[13] The Anglo-Italian League Cup was created in 1969 to match English cup winners against the winners of the Coppa Italia, and was permanently disbanded in 1976.[14] In 1985, the Full Members Cup and Football League Super Cup were created as substitutes for UEFA competitions after UEFA responded to the Heysel Stadium disaster by banning English clubs.[15][16] They finished in 1986 and 1992 respectively. The Football League Centenary Trophy marked The Football League's 100th birthday, in the 1988–89 season.[17]

Lower down in the hierarchy of English football are many other competitions, not included in the tables on this page. These include competitions run by the above national governing bodies, but organised for clubs ineligible for higher competitions. For example, the Texaco Cup, EFL Trophy, and Anglo-Italian Cups. Regional competitions are organised by County Football Associations. In the modern day, county cups generally involve lower or regional division clubs, or reserve sides, although most clubs founded in the early years of English football used to play in county competitions.

Summary totals

Numbers in bold are record totals for that category. Clubs in italics are Double winners: they have won two or more of the trophies listed as tournaments. Trophies that were shared between two clubs are counted as honours for both teams. Clubs tied in total honours are listed chronologically by most recent honour won. See the other tables for breakdowns of each competition won.

Cups here are competitions with a knockout format. Among FIFA and UEFA competitions, these are the UEFA Champions League, the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup, the UEFA Europa League, the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, the UEFA Intertoto Cup, and the FIFA Club World Cup. Among top-qualifying competitions overseen by The FA, these are the top division, the FA Cup, the League Cup, the Full Members Cup, the Football League Super Cup, the Football League Centenary Trophy, and the Football League Centenary Tournament.

Super cups here consist of the two FIFA and UEFA honours that had only two participating clubs per season. These are the Intercontinental Cup and UEFA Super Cup.

Shields are the FA Community Shield and its precursor the Sheriff of London Charity Shield. The Anglo-Italian League Cup is also listed as a shield because it only had two clubs competing per season.

Last updated 23 February 2017.

Combined totals of English men's clubs by wins in FIFA and UEFA honours and top-qualifying FA, EFL and PL honours
FIFA and UEFA FA, EFL and PL (top-qualifying) Total
Club Cups Super Cups Total League Cups Shields Total League Cups Shields & S. Cups Total
Manchester United 6 2 8 20 17 21 58 20 23 23 66
Liverpool 8 3 11 18 16 16 50 18 24 19 61
Arsenal 2 2 13 16 15 44 13 18 15 46
Chelsea 4 1 5 6 14 4 24 6 18 5 29
Tottenham Hotspur 3 3 2 12 9 23 2 15 9 26
Aston Villa 2 1 3 7 12 3 22 7 14 4 25
Everton 1 1 9 5 9 23 9 6 9 24
Manchester City 1 1 4 9 4 17 4 10 4 18
Newcastle United 2 2 4 6 2 12 4 8 2 14
Nottingham Forest 2 1 3 1 9 1 11 1 11 2 14
Wolverhampton Wanderers 3 6 4 13 3 6 4 13
Blackburn Rovers 3 8 1 12 3 8 1 12
Sheffield Wednesday 4 4 2 10 4 4 2 10
Sunderland 6 2 2 10 6 2 2 10
Leeds United 2 2 3 2 2 7 3 4 2 9
West Bromwich Albion 1 6 2 9 1 6 2 9
West Ham United 2 2 3 1 4 5 1 6
Sheffield United 1 4 1 6 1 4 1 6
Leicester City 1 3 1 5 1 3 1 5
Portsmouth 2 2 1 5 2 2 1 5
Burnley 2 1 2 5 2 1 2 5
Bolton Wanderers 4 1 5 4 1 5
Huddersfield Town 3 1 1 5 3 1 1 5
Wanderers 5 5 5 5
Derby County 2 1 1 4 2 1 1 4
Preston North End 2 2 4 2 2 4
Ipswich Town 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 3
Corinthian 3 3 3 3
Birmingham City 2 2 2 2
Swindon Town 1 1 2 1 1 2
Norwich City 2 2 2 2
Cardiff City[a] 1 1 2 1 1 2
Bury 2 2 2 2
Old Etonians 2 2 2 2
Wigan Athletic 1 1 1 1
Swansea City[b] 1 1 1 1
Middlesbrough 1 1 1 1
Fulham 1 1 1 1
Crystal Palace 1 1 1 1
Luton Town 1 1 1 1
Reading 1 1 1 1
Wimbledon 1 1 1 1
Coventry City 1 1 1 1
Oxford United 1 1 1 1
Southampton 1 1 1 1
Stoke City 1 1 1 1
Queens Park Rangers 1 1 1 1
Blackpool 1 1 1 1
Charlton Athletic 1 1 1 1
Barnsley 1 1 1 1
Bradford City 1 1 1 1
Brighton & Hove Albion 1 1 1 1
Queen's Park[c] 1 1 1 1
Notts County 1 1 1 1
Blackburn Olympic 1 1 1 1
Old Carthusians 1 1 1 1
Clapham Rovers 1 1 1 1
Royal Engineers 1 1 1 1
Oxford University 1 1 1 1

FIFA and UEFA honours

A silver trophy with red ribbons on it, set against a green background
The UEFA Champions League trophy. Liverpool won it for a fifth time in 2005, an English record.
UCL
UEFA Champions League.[1][18] Since 1955. Known as the European Cup until 1992.
UEL
UEFA Europa League.[19][2] Since 1971. Known as the UEFA Cup until 2009.
USC
UEFA Super Cup.[4] Since 1972.
ICFC
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup.[20] Held from 1955 to 1971. Although not organised by UEFA, it is included here under UEFA as it is the official predecessor to the UEL.[2]
UCWC
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup.[3][21] Held from 1960 until 1999. Merged with the UEL.
UIC
UEFA Intertoto Cup.[5] Held from 1995 to 2008.
IC
Intercontinental Cup.[6][22][23] Held from 1960 to 2004. Although the competition was organised by UEFA and CONMEBOL, it was officially merged with the FIFA Club World Cup below, and the winners are recognised by FIFA as club world champions.[24]
FCWC
FIFA Club World Cup.[7][25] Since 2000.

Winners of each competition are referenced above. Numbers in bold are English record totals for that competition. Trophies that were shared between two clubs are counted as honours for both teams. Clubs tied in total honours are listed chronologically by most recent honour won.

Last updated 2 February 2017.

English men's clubs by FIFA and UEFA honours won
Club UCL UEL USC ICFC UCWC UIC IC FCWC Total
Liverpool 5 3 3 11
Manchester United 3 1 1 1 1 1 8
Chelsea 1 1 1 2 5
Aston Villa 1 1 1 3
Tottenham Hotspur 2 1 3
Nottingham Forest 2 1 3
Newcastle United 1 1 2
West Ham United 1 1 2
Arsenal 1 1 2
Leeds United 2 2
Fulham 1 1
Everton 1 1
Ipswich Town 1 1
Manchester City 1 1

FA, EFL and PL honours (top-qualifying)

This section only lists competitions overseen by The FA (and its subsidiary leagues the EFL and Premier League) where there are no higher competitions clubs could participate in instead. See the next section for other competitions run by these bodies.

The Premier League trophy. This one is a unique gold colour to commemorate Arsenal's completion of the only unbeaten 38-match season.
EFC
English football champions.[11][26][27] The Premier League (since 1992) succeeded the Football League First Division (1888 until 1992) as the top-division.
FAC
FA Cup.[10][28] Since 1871.
EFLC
EFL Cup.[13][29] Since 1960.
FACS
FA Community Shield.[12] Since 1908. Known as the FA Charity Shield until 2002.[30]
FLSC
Football League Super Cup.[15] One-off tournament held between 1985 and 1986.
FMC
Full Members Cup.[16] Held from 1985 to 1992. For the first season, the Football League Super Cup above was a higher competition for which six clubs qualified instead, but the season is included here for completeness.[31][32]
FLCT
Football League Centenary Trophy.[33][17] Held during the 1988–89 season to celebrate Football League's 100th birthday.
FLCF
Football League Centenary Festival, also known as the Football League Centenary Tournament.[34] A less competitive precursor to the Football League Centenary Trophy above, it had broader entry criteria and 40 minute matches.[35] Also a celebration of the Football League's 100th birthday, it was held during the 1987–88 season.
AILC
Anglo-Italian League Cup.[14] Held from 1969 until 1971 and from 1975 until 1976.
SLCS
Sheriff of London Charity Shield.[12] 1898 until 1907. Predecessor to the FA Community Shield above.[36] The post-1907 fundraising matches for the Shield are not included because they no longer had FA involvement.

Winners of each competition are referenced above. Numbers in bold are record totals for that competition. Clubs in italics are Double winners: they have won two or more of the top division, the FA Cup, and the EFL Cup. Trophies that were shared between two clubs are counted as honours for both teams. Clubs tied in total honours are listed chronologically by most recent honour won.

Last updated 2 February 2017.

Men's clubs by top-qualifying FA, EFL and PL competitions won
Club EFC FAC EFLC FACS SLCS FMC FLSC FLCT FLCF AILC Total
Manchester United 20 12 5 21 58
Liverpool 18 7 8 15 1 1 50
Arsenal 13 13 2 15 1 44
Chelsea 6 7 5 4 2 24
Tottenham Hotspur 2 8 4 7 1 1 23
Everton 9 5 9 23
Aston Villa 7 7 5 1 2 22
Manchester City 4 5 4 4 17
Wolverhampton Wanderers 3 4 2 4 13
Blackburn Rovers 3 6 1 1 1 12
Newcastle United 4 6 1 1 12
Nottingham Forest 1 2 4 1 2 1 11
Sheffield Wednesday 4 3 1 1 1 10
Sunderland 6 2 1 1 10
West Bromwich Albion 1 5 1 2 9
Leeds United 3 1 1 2 7
Sheffield United 1 4 1 6
Leicester City 1 3 1 5
Portsmouth 2 2 1 5
Burnley 2 1 2 5
Bolton Wanderers 4 1 5
Huddersfield Town 3 1 1 5
Wanderers 5 5
West Ham United 3 1 4
Derby County 2 1 1 4
Preston North End 2 2 4
Corinthian 3 3
Birmingham City 2 2
Ipswich Town 1 1 2
Swindon Town 1 1 2
Norwich City 2 2
Cardiff City[a] 1 1 2
Bury 2 2
Old Etonians 2 2
Wigan Athletic 1 1
Swansea City[b] 1 1
Middlesbrough 1 1
Crystal Palace 1 1
Luton Town 1 1
Reading 1 1
Wimbledon 1 1
Coventry City 1 1
Oxford United 1 1
Southampton 1 1
Stoke City 1 1
Queens Park Rangers 1 1
Blackpool 1 1
Charlton Athletic 1 1
Barnsley 1 1
Bradford City 1 1
Brighton & Hove Albion 1 1
Queen's Park[c] 1 1
Notts County 1 1
Blackburn Olympic 1 1
Old Carthusians 1 1
Clapham Rovers 1 1
Royal Engineers 1 1
Oxford University 1 1

FA, EFL and PL honours (lower-qualifying)

In addition to the honours listed in the section above, England's football governing bodies have also organized a variety of less prominent honours for clubs that were not eligible for the honours above. One example is the Texaco Cup (or International League Board Competition), which was available for top division sides that hadn't qualified for Europe, and was one of the few attempts to create a cross-border competition between clubs from the various nations of the UK and Ireland.[37] Another is the EFL Trophy, which involves clubs from League One and League Two (the third and fourth tiers of the English football league system).[38]

County FA honours

Aside from the national honours covered in previous sections, English football also has honours run by a network of regional governing bodies known as County Football Associations. These associations are roughly based around county lines, although some cover multiple counties or the boundaries of major cities. They generally have a Senior Cup, such as the London Senior Cup, as their premier competition for men's clubs. In some cases, such as the London Senior Cup, this involves the senior first-teams of lower-division or regional-division clubs; in other cases it can have other formats, such as the Manchester Senior Cup, which became a reserve team competition for six large clubs from the region. In the years when league football was unavailable or only available to northern and midlands clubs, County Cups were often secondary only to the FA Cup.

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b Cardiff City are a Welsh side who play in the EFL Championship and won the 1926–27 FA Cup.
  2. ^ a b Swansea City are a Welsh side who play in the Premier League of the English football league system and won the 2013–14 Football League Cup.
  3. ^ a b Queen's Park are a Scottish side who competed in the 1899 Sheriff of London Charity Shield and shared the honour.

References

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  2. ^ a b c "From Fairs Cup via UEFA Cup to UEFA Europa League". UEFA. 2017. Archived from the original on 2 July 2017. Retrieved 7 September 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Stokkermans, Karel (26 January 2000). "European Cup Winners' Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 2017-08-14. Retrieved 15 March 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Stokkermans, Karel (10 August 2017). "European Super Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 2017-09-06. Retrieved 2017-11-05. 
  5. ^ a b Stokkermans, Karel (15 January 2010). "UEFA Intertoto Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 2017-09-11. Retrieved 15 March 2017. 
  6. ^ a b Magnani, Loris; Stokkermans, Karel (30 April 2005). "Intercontinental Club Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 2017-10-12. Retrieved 15 March 2017. 
  7. ^ a b Leme de Arruda, Marcelo; Di Maggio, Roberto (12 January 2017). "FIFA Club World Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 2017-07-14. Retrieved 15 March 2017. 
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  9. ^ "Oldest football cup 'not for sale'". BBC News. 2014-10-14. Archived from the original on 5 November 2017. Retrieved 2017-11-04. 
  10. ^ a b Ross, James (8 June 2017). "England FA Challenge Cup Finals". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 2017-09-16. Retrieved 2017-11-05. 
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  12. ^ a b c Ross, James (10 August 2017). "England - List of FA Charity/Community Shield Matches". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 2017-11-05. Retrieved 2017-11-05. 
  13. ^ a b Ross, James (2 March 2017). "England - Football League Cup Finals". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 2017-09-06. Retrieved 15 March 2017. 
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  15. ^ a b "Screen Sport Super Cup Summary". www.fchd.info. Football Club History Database. Archived from the original on 5 July 2017. Retrieved 27 August 2017. 
  16. ^ a b "Football League Full Members' Cup Summary". www.fchd.info. Football Club History Database. Archived from the original on 5 July 2017. Retrieved 27 August 2017. 
  17. ^ a b Pye, Steven (2017-01-04). "How Arsenal won the Centenary Trophy, the least celebrated title in their history". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 2017-09-24. Retrieved 2017-11-05. 
  18. ^ "European Cup roll of honour". UEFA. 2017. Archived from the original on 7 September 2017. Retrieved 7 September 2017. 
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  20. ^ Stokkermans, Karel (26 January 2000). "Fairs' Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 2017-08-14. Retrieved 15 March 2017. 
  21. ^ "UEFA Cup Winners' Cup History". UEFA. Archived from the original on 2008-02-02. Retrieved 2008-02-25. 
  22. ^ FIFA (2004-12-13). "Toyota Cup: figures, records and a giant-killer". FIFA.com. Archived from the original on 2017-11-05. Retrieved 2017-11-05. 
  23. ^ Risolo, Donn (2010). "The Ugly Legacy of the Late, Unlamented Intercontinental Cup". Soccer Stories: Anecdotes, Oddities, Lore, and Amazing Feats. U of Nebraska Press. pp. 106–110. ISBN 0803233957. Retrieved 2017-11-05. 
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  27. ^ "History". Premier League. 2017. Archived from the original on 8 July 2017. Retrieved 7 September 2017. 
  28. ^ "FA CUP FINALS, 1872-TODAY". The FA. Archived from the original on 13 June 2017. Retrieved 7 September 2017. 
  29. ^ "Roll of honour". English Football League. 2016. Archived from the original on 30 November 2016. 
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  32. ^ Pye, Steven (2017-09-29). "When Chelsea won a league game and a Wembley cup final in the same weekend". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 2017-09-29. Retrieved 2017-11-08. 
  33. ^ "Mercantile Credit Centenary Trophy 1988". footballdatabase.eu. Archived from the original on 27 August 2017. Retrieved 27 August 2017. 
  34. ^ "Manager Brian Clough misses team's big win". Toronto Star. 18 April 1988. Retrieved 13 January 2018. 
  35. ^ Crist, Matthew (2017-08-05). "100 years bore: the arduous and elongated Football League centenary celebrations in 1988". These Football Times. Archived from the original on 2017-10-25. Retrieved 2017-11-08. 
  36. ^ Chapman, Brian (14 January 2015). "Local newspapers, football match reports and the 1908 FA Charity Shield". Archived from the original on 2017-06-12. Retrieved 2017-11-05. 
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  38. ^ EFL (10 June 2016). "Premier League trial for the Trophy". www.efl.com. English Football League. Archived from the original on 2017-09-25. Retrieved 12 February 2018. 

External links

  • "The Introduction Page of the RSSSF -- The Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. 
  • "Football Club History Database Index". www.fchd.info. Football Club History Database. 
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