List of colleges and universities in New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers University
Mead Hall at Drew University
Cleveland Tower at Princeton University

As of 2014, the State of New Jersey recognizes and licenses 66 institutions of higher education (post-secondary) through its Commission on Higher Education. These institutions include four public research universities, eight state colleges and universities, fourteen private colleges and universities (two of which are classified as research universities), nineteen county colleges, fourteen religious institutions, and eight for-profit proprietary schools.[1]

New Jersey was the only British colony to permit the establishment of two colleges in the colonial period. Princeton University, chartered in 1746 as the College of New Jersey, and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, chartered on November 10, 1766 as Queen's College, were two of nine colleges founded before the American Revolution.[2][3][4]:passim. In the 1860s, these two colleges competed to become the state's land grant college under the terms of the Morrill Act of 1862 which provided land and funding to expand development of engineering, scientific, agricultural, and military education at one school in each state. Rutgers received the designation in 1864 began to expand instruction in these areas and taking on a hybrid private-public role that paved the way for its transformation into a state university in 1945. Today, Rutgers is a large public research university serving over 65,000 students. Princeton remained a private college and developed into a research university that is one of the nation's eight prestigious Ivy League schools.

On August 22, 2012, the New Jersey governor Chris Christie signed into law the New Jersey Medical and Health Science Education Restructuring Act which divided the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) between Rutgers and Rowan University, creating two public medical schools.[5][6] According to The Star-Ledger, the law gave Rutgers "nearly all of UMDNJ—including its medical schools in Newark and Piscataway—in one of the greatest expansions in the state university's history" and southern New Jersey's Rowan University would "take over UMDNJ's osteopathic medical school in Stratford."[7]

There are three law schools in the state accredited by the American Bar Association; two at Rutgers (at the university's Rutgers–Newark and Rutgers–Camden campuses respectively) and the other at Seton Hall University's campus in Newark.[8]

Colleges and universities

Public colleges and universities

School Location Founded Control[9] Type[9] Enrollment Accreditation
Kean University Union and Hillside 1855 Public Master's 16,000+ MSA
Montclair State University Montclair 1908 Public Research university 20,465 MSA
New Jersey City University Jersey City 1929 Public Master's 8,550 MSA
New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark 1881 Public Research university 10,130 MSA
Ramapo College Mahwah 1969 Public Master's 6,008 MSA
Rowan University Glassboro, Camden, and Stratford 1923 Public Research university 13,349 MSA
Rutgers University[a] New Brunswick and Piscataway, Camden, and Newark 1766 Public Research university 65,000+ MSA
Stockton University Galloway 1969 Public Master's 8,111 MSA
The College of New Jersey Ewing 1855 Public Master's 6,964 MSA
Thomas Edison State University Trenton 1972 Public Master's 20,877 MSA
William Paterson University Wayne 1855 Public Master's 11,423 MSA

Private colleges and universities

School Location Founded Control[9] Type[9] Enrollment Accreditation
Bloomfield College Bloomfield 1868 Private Baccalaureate 2,156[11] MSA
Caldwell University Caldwell 1939 Private Master's 2,284[12] MSA
Centenary University Hackettstown, Parsippany, and Edison 1867 Private Master's 3,000+ MSA
College of Saint Elizabeth Morris Twp./Florham Park 1899 Private Master's 2,044 MSA
Drew University Madison 1867 Private Baccalaureate 2,369 MSA
Fairleigh Dickinson University Madison and Florham Park and Teaneck and Hackensack 1942 Private Master's 12,000+ MSA
Felician University Lodi and Rutherford 1942 Private Master's 2,040 MSA
Georgian Court University Lakewood 1908 Private Master's 1,772 MSA
Monmouth University West Long Branch 1933 Private Master's 6,494 MSA
Princeton University Princeton 1746 Private Research university 8,010 MSA
Rider University Lawrence 1865 Private Master's 5,790 MSA
St. Peter's University Jersey City 1881 Private Master's 2,987 MSA
Seton Hall University South Orange 1856 Private Research university 9,745 MSA
Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken 1870 Private Research university 5,260 MSA

County community colleges

Sussex County's freeholders purchased Don Bosco College, a Roman Catholic seminary, for its community college campus in 1989.

New Jersey has a system of 19 public community colleges at the county level statewide. This reflects the fact that each college serves one of New Jersey's 21 counties, except for Atlantic Cape Community College and Raritan Valley Community College, each of which serves two counties. In 1989, the New Jersey Council of County Colleges was created to promote the advancement of the state's county community colleges. In 2003, governor James McGreevey created the New Jersey Community Colleges Compact, through Executive Order No. 81, as a statewide partnership to enable cooperation between the colleges and various state departments. The county colleges of New Jersey represent 56% of all undergraduate students in the state and offer studies in associate degree and certificate programs. Reflecting long-term trends nationwide, the male-to-female ratio of students in the system is 41% male to 59% female, and 48% of students are over the age of 24. Overall, the system enrolls more than 350,000 students each year on campuses that range in size from 1,300 students at Salem Community College to over 15,000 students at Bergen Community College.

Not all of the county colleges were founded by the State of New Jersey; the oldest county college in New Jersey, Union County College, was founded in 1933 by the Federal Emergency Relief Administration as Union County Junior College; it operated as a private college from 1936 to 1982, and merged with the publicly operated Union County Technical Institute in 1982 to become the current public institution.[13]

For-profit institutions

School Location Founded Control[9] Type[9] Enrollment Accreditation
Berkeley College Dover, Newark, Paramus, Woodland Park, Woodbridge, New York City, and White Plains - Proprietary
(for-profit)
Special focus institution 3,709[14] MSA
DeVry University North Brunswick 1931 Proprietary
(for-profit)
Baccalaureate
Associate's
90,000[b] -
Eastern International College Jersey City and Belleville - Proprietary
(for-profit)
Not classified - ACCSCT
Eastwick College Ramsey, Hackensack, Paterson, and Nutley 1985 Proprietary
(for-profit)
Not classified - ACICS
ITT Technical Institute - - Proprietary
(for-profit)
Special focus institution - ACICS
Jersey College[c] Teterboro, Ewing, Tampa, Jacksonville, and Fort Lauderdale - Proprietary
(for-profit)
College of nursing - COE,
Lincoln Technical Institute Edison, Mahwah, Moorestown, Paramus, South Plainfield, Union, New Britain, Shelton, Columbia, Brockton, Lowell, Somerville, New York City, Allentown, Philadelphia (3 locations), and Lincoln 1947 Proprietary
(for-profit)
Baccalaureate
Associate's
3,995 [d] ACICS
Strayer University Cherry Hill 1892 Proprietary
(for-profit)
Master's 54,325[e] MSE
University of Phoenix Jersey City - Proprietary
(for-profit)
Special focus institution - NCACS

Independent religious schools

Religious colleges

School Location Founded Control[9] Type[9] Enrollment Accreditation
Assumption College for Sisters Denville 1953 Private Associates 40[21] MSA, NJCHE
Pillar College Zarephath (Franklin Twp. and Newark 1908 Private Special focus institution 241[22] MSA

Christian theological seminaries

Theological schools are typically classified as "Special Topic Institutions" by the Carnegie Foundation.

School Location Founded Affiliation Accreditation Notes
Drew Theological School Madison 1867 United Methodist Church ATS, MSA
  • Founded as Methodist seminary, expanded into Drew University when liberal arts education added in 1928.
New Brunswick Theological Seminary New Brunswick 1784 Reformed Church in America ATS, MSA
  • Oldest seminary in the United States, founded as Dutch Reformed seminary in New York City, moved to New Brunswick in 1810, run jointly and shared facilities with Queen's College, later Rutgers College, until 1856.
Princeton Theological Seminary Princeton 1812 Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) ATS, MSA
  • Second-oldest seminary in the United States, second largest theological library collection in the world, behind only the Vatican Apostolic Library in Vatican City
Key
Abbreviation Accrediting agency
AARTS Association of Advanced Rabbinical and Talmudic Schools
ATS Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada
MSA Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
NJCHE New Jersey Commission on Higher Education

Talmudic schools

School Location Founded Affiliation Accreditation Notes
Bais Medrash Toras Chesed Lakewood - - AARTS -
Beth Medrash Govoha Lakewood 1943 - AARTS -
Mesivta Keser Torah Belmar - - AARTS -
Rabbi Jacob Joseph School Edison and New York City - - AARTS -
Rabbinical College of America Morristown 1973 Jewish (Chabad Lubavitch Chasidic) AARTS
  • Rabbinical college, also offers orthodox day school for boys and girls and summer programs
Talmudical Academy of Central New Jersey Howell 1972 Orthodox Jewish AARTS
  • Includes an orthodox yeshiva high school and rabbinical college
Yeshivas Be'er Yitzchok Elizabeth - - AARTS -
Yeshiva Gedola Zichron Leyma Linden - - (pending) -
Yeshiva Toras Chaim Lakewood - - AARTS -
Yeshivat Yesodei HaTorah Lakewood - - AARTS -

Defunct institutions

List of defunct institutions in New Jersey
School Location Control Founded Closed Notes
Alma White College Zarephath (Franklin Twp.) - - 1978 -
Alphonsus College - - - 1974 -
Bayonne Junior College Bayonne - - 1951 -
Bergen Junior College Teaneck - - 1954 Teaneck Merged with Fairleigh Dickinson University
College of South Jersey Camden - - 1950 Merged with Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Don Bosco College Newton - - 1990 Campus sold to County of Sussex to house Sussex County Community College
Englewood Cliffs College Englewood Cliffs - - 1974 -
Essex Junior College - - - 1937 -
Evelyn College for Women Princeton - - - -
Gibbs College Livingston, Boston, Norwalk, Tysons Corner , and Cranston - - - -
Immaculate Conception Seminary South Orange - - - 1986 Affiliated with Seton Hall University
Jersey City Junior College Jersey City - - - 1959 Students transferred to Jersey City State College, now New Jersey City University
John Marshall College - - - 1950 Merged into Seton Hall University as their law school
Law School of South Jersey Camden - - 1949 Became part of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Luther College of Bible - - - 1978 -
Maryknoll Junior College - - - 1954 -
Mother Savior Seminary - - - 1961 -
Mount Saint Mary College - - - 1970 -
Northeastern Bible College Essex Fells - - - 1990 -
Panzer College of Physical Education Montclair - - - 1958 Merged with Montclair State College, now Montclair State University
Saint Gabriel's College - - - 1968 -
Saint Joseph's College - - - 1970 -
Saint Michael's Monastery Union City - - - 1984 -
Salesian College - - - 1973 -
Shelton College Cape May - - - 1971 -
Tombrock College - - - 1976 -
Touro University College of Medicine Hackensack - - - -
Trenton Junior College & School of Industrial Arts - - - 1967 Merged with Mercer County Community College
Union College - - - 1982 Merged with Union County Technical Institute to become Union County College
University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) New Brunswick, Newark, Camden, Stratford, Piscataway, and Scotch Plains Public - 2013 Most of UMDNJ merged with Rutgers University in 2012–13; the School of Osteopathic Medicine 2013 merged with Rowan.
University of Newark - - - 1947 Merged with Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Upsala College East Orange and Wantage Private, Lutheran-affiliated 1893 1995 Financial issues
Villa Walsh Academy Morristown - - - 1971 -
Westminster Choir College Princeton - - - 1992 After financial problems, merged with Rider University

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ Rutgers includes four campuses: the three traditional campuses of Rutgers-New Brunswick, Rutgers–Camden, and Rutgers–Newark; and a fourth "campus", Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, a division oversees medical and health education at several locations statewide subsequent to the 2012–2013 merger between Rutgers and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ).[10]
  2. ^ as a for-profit institution without a traditional academic residency or campus, DeVry offers courses nationwide through online instruction and distance learning. This number does not reflect students in residence on a campus or enrolled for classes in New Jersey.
  3. ^ formerly The Center for Allied Health and Nursing Education
  4. ^ Number derived from addition of campus enrollment numbers. Edison: 843;[15] Mahwah: 743;[16] Moorestown: 919;[17] Paramus: 1012;[18] South Plainfield: 269;[19] Union: 1209[17]
  5. ^ as a for-profit institution without a traditional academic residency or campus, Strayer, based in Washington DC, offers courses nationwide through online instruction and distance learning. This number does not reflect students in residence on a campus or enrolled for classes in New Jersey.[20]

Citations

  1. ^ New Jersey Commission on Higher Education. New Jersey College & University Directory by Sector (updated April 1, 2014). Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  2. ^ Stoeckel, Althea. "Presidents, professors, and politics: the colonial colleges and the American revolution", Conspectus of History (1976) 1(3):45–56.
  3. ^ Chapter XXIII. Education. § 13. Colonial Colleges in The Cambridge History of English and American Literature. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1907–1921; online edition, 2000).
  4. ^ McCormick, Richard P., Rutgers: A Bicentennial History (New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1966).
  5. ^ State of New Jersey, New Jersey State Legislature, A.3102/S.2063: "New Jersey Medical and Health Sciences Education Restructuring Act" (second reprint), later codified as P.L. 2012, c.45. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  6. ^ State of New Jersey, Office of the Governor. "Governor Christie Signs Historic Legislation to Reorganize and Secure Future of New Jersey's Higher Education System" (press release), August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  7. ^ Heyboer, Kelly, and DeMarco, Megan, "Gov. Christie signs N.J. higher education merger bill", The Star-Ledger, August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  8. ^ American Bar Association. "ABA-Approved Law Schools by Year". Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education: Institution Lookup Archived May 11, 2014, at Archive-It. Retrieved March 26, 2014.
  10. ^ Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, "Our Campuses". Retrieved April 6, 2014.
  11. ^ Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Institution Profile: Bloomfield College, Bloomfield, New Jersey, Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  12. ^ Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Institution Profile: Caldwell College, Caldwell, New Jersey, Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  13. ^ Union County College, "About UCC - History". Retrieved 5 March 2014.
  14. ^ Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Institution Profile: Berkeley College, Woodland Park, New Jersey, Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  15. ^ Lincoln Technical Institute at Edison. [1], Lincoln Technical Institute at Edison. Retrieved August 5, 2014.
  16. ^ Lincoln Technical Institute at Mahwah. Lincoln Technical Institute at Mahwah. Retrieved 05 August 2014.
  17. ^ a b Lincoln Technical Institute at Moorestown. Lincoln Technical Institute at Mooreswtown. Retrieved 05 August 2014.
  18. ^ Lincoln Technical Institute at Paramus. Lincoln Technical Institute at Paramus. Retrieved 05 August 2014.
  19. ^ Lincoln Technical Institute at South Plainfield. Lincoln Technical Institute at South Plainfield. Retrieved 05 August 2014.
  20. ^ Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Institution Profile: Strayer University, Washington, DC, Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  21. ^ Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Institution Profile: Assumption College for Sisters, Mendham, New Jersey, Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  22. ^ Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Institution Profile: Pillar College (Somerset Christian College, Zarephath, New Jersey), Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  23. ^ "New Jersey State Loans" Retrieved 2016-07-03

External links

  • College & University Directory by Sector from New Jersey Commission on Higher Education
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_colleges_and_universities_in_New_Jersey&oldid=810221906"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_colleges_and_universities_in_New_Jersey
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "List of colleges and universities in New Jersey"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA