List of awards and nominations received by Paul Kelly

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Paul Kelly awards and nominations

Paul Kelly, November 2007
Awards and nominations
Award Wins Nominations
ARIA Awards
10 44
APRA Awards
2 4
APRA-AGSC Awards Screen Music Awards
1 4
CMAA Awards Country Music Awards
6 12
Mo Awards Entertainment industry awards
4 4
Victorian Country Music Awards
3 3
Totals
Awards won 25
Nominations 62

Paul Kelly is an Australian rock/folk musician, singer-songwriter who started his professional career in 1974 and released his first recording in 1979.[1] Kelly, in various guises, has released eighteen studio albums, Talk (1981), Manila (1982), Post (1985), Gossip (1986), Under The Sun (1987), So Much Water So Close To Home (1989), Comedy (1991), Hidden Things (1992), Wanted Man (1994), Deeper Water (1995), Words and Music (1998), Smoke (1999), Professor Ratbaggy (1999), Nothing But A Dream (2001), Ways & Means (2004), Foggy Highway (2005), Stardust Five (2006), and Stolen Apples (2007).[2]

Kelly has won and been nominated for numerous music awards. They include nine Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) Awards and three Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) Awards/Australian Guild of Screen Composers (AGSC) Awards. APRA also named "To Her Door", solely written by Kelly,[3][4] and "Treaty", written by Kelly and members of Indigenous Australian band Yothu Yindi,[5][6] in the Top 30 best Australian songs of all time in 2001.[7] Kelly was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame in 1997 alongside The Bee Gees and Graeme Bell.[8][9] This induction recognised his achievement of a "significant body of recorded work" and that he "has had a cultural impact within Australia".[8] Kelly has also won awards in the country music field with six from the Country Music Association of Australia (CMAA) and three more from the Victorian Country Music Awards. As a live performer, Kelly won four Australian entertainment industry awards or Mo Awards.

History

Paul Kelly has performed in many guises including: as a solo act; as the leader of various bands – the Paul Kelly Band, Paul Kelly and the Dots, Paul Kelly and the Coloured Girls, Paul Kelly and the Messengers, Paul Kelly and the Boon Companions, and Paul Kelly and the Stormwater Boys; and as a member of the related projects Professor Ratbaggy and Stardust Five.[1][2][10] He has also performed or composed award winning or nominated songs with other artists including Christine Anu, Uncle Bill, Kev Carmody and Archie Roach.[1][2][10] The category for which he has received most nominations is Best Male Artist, or its equivalent as Male Vocalist of the Year (Country Music) or Male Rock Performer, with a total of 14 nominations resulting in four wins.

Australian of the Year Awards

The Australian of the Year Awards were established in 1960, in celebration Australia Day (26 January), to give proper recognition to a leading citizen, whose contribution to the nation's culture, economy, sciences or arts was particularly outstanding.[11] The recipient is determined by the National Australia Day Council from the State winners.[12] Kelly was a Victorian State Finalist for the 2012 Australian of the Year Award.[13]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
2012 Paul Kelly[13] Australian of the Year (Victorian winner) State Finalist

Australian Record Industry Association (ARIA) Awards

These awards have been presented by the ARIA since 1987. Paul Kelly has won ten ARIA Awards from at least 44 nominations, including his first win in 1988 for the 'Best Video' award for "To Her Door", which was written by Kelly and performed by Paul Kelly and the Coloured Girls.[3][4] His success has been across categories, being successful three times in 'Best Adult Contemporary Album', and twice each in the 'Best Male Artist' and 'Best Original Soundtrack' categories.[14] Notably, Kelly has been nominated for 'Best Male Artist' at least sixteen times including a run of eight years in a row 1995 to 2002 winning in 1997 and 1998.[14] Kelly was also inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame in 1997 alongside The Bee Gees and Graeme Bell.[8][9]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
1987 Gossip Best Male Artist Nominated
Album of the Year Nominated
"Before Too Long" Single of the Year Nominated
Song of the Year Nominated
Gossip – Alan Thorne Producer of the Year Nominated
1988 "To Her Door"[nb 1] Best Video Won
1989[17] "Forty Miles to Saturday Night" Best Male Artist Nominated
1990[18] So Much Water So Close To Home Album of the Year Nominated
Best Male Artist Nominated
Best Adult Contemporary Album Nominated
"Careless" Song of the Year Nominated
1993 "Paul Kelly Live" Best Male Artist Nominated
1994 "Last Train"[nb 2] Best Video Nominated
"Last Train" – Angelique Cooper[nb 3] Producer of the Year Nominated
1995 Wanted Man Best Male Artist Nominated
1996 Deeper Water Best Male Artist Nominated
1997 How to Make Gravy Best Male Artist Won
Songs from the South Best Cover Art Nominated
"Tease Me - Tease Me"[nb 4] Engineer of the Year Nominated
"How to Make Gravy" Song of the Year Nominated
Paul Kelly ARIA Hall of Fame Inducted
1998 Words and Music Best Male Artist Won
1999 "I'll Be Your Lover" Best Male Artist Nominated
2000 Smoke Best Male Artist Nominated
2001 Roll on Summer Best Male Artist Nominated
2002 Nothing but a Dream Best Male Artist Nominated
Lantana[nb 5] Best Original Soundtrack / Cast / Show Recording Won
Sensual Being[nb 6] Producer of the Year Nominated
Nothing but a Dream Best Adult Contemporary Album Won
2004 Ways & Means Best Adult Contemporary Album Won
2005 Foggy Highway Best Male Artist Nominated
Best Country Album Nominated
2006 Jindabyne[nb 7] Best Original Soundtrack / Cast / Show Recording Won
2007 Stolen Apples Best Male Artist Nominated
Best Adult Contemporary Album Nominated
2008 "To Her Door (Live)" Best Male Artist Nominated
Live Apples Best Music DVD Nominated
2013 Spring and Fall Best Male Artist Nominated
Conversations with Ghosts[nb 8] Best Original Soundtrack / Cast / Show Recording Won
Paul Kelly and Neil Finn – Australian Tour: February – March 2013 Best Australian Live Act Nominated
2014 Paul Kelly and Neil Finn – Goin' Your Way Best Adult Contemporary Won
2015 The Merri Soul Sessions Best Independent Release Nominated
Best Adult Contemporary Album Nominated
The Merri Soul Sessions Tour Best Australian Live Act Nominated

Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) Awards

These awards were established by APRA in 1982 to honour the achievements of songwriters and music composers, and to recognise their songwriting skills, sales and airplay performance, by its members annually. Paul Kelly has won two APRA Awards out of four nominations.[25][26][27][28] The songs "To Her Door" and "Treaty", written or co-written by Kelly,[3][4][5][6] were also voted in the Top 30 Best Australian songs of all time in 2001 by a panel of 100 music industry personalities.[7]

At the 2011 APRA Music Awards Kelly was honoured with the Ted Albert Award for Outstanding Services to Australian Music.[29]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
1991 "Treaty"[nb 9] Song of the Year Won
1998 "How to Make Gravy" Song of the Year Nominated
1999 Paul Kelly Songwriter of the Year Won
2001 "To Her Door" Best Australian songs Top 30
"Treaty"[nb 9] Best Australian songs Top 30
2004 "I Wish I was a Train"[nb 10] Most Performed Country Work Nominated
2011 Ted Albert Award for Outstanding Services to Australian Music

APRA-AGSC Screen Music Awards

These awards are presented annually by APRA in conjunction with Australian Guild of Screen Composers (AGSC) for television and films scores and soundtracks. Paul Kelly has won one award from four nominations.[31][32]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
2002 Lantana[nb 5] Best Feature Film Score Nominated
Best Soundtrack Album Nominated
One Night the Moon[nb 11] Best Soundtrack Album Won
2007 Jindabyne[nb 7] Best Soundtrack Album Nominated

Country Music Association of Australia (CMAA) Awards

These annual awards have been presented by CMAA since 1973,[34] to "encourage, promote and recognise excellence in Australian country music recording."[35] Paul Kelly has won six Country Music Awards from twelve nominations.[36][37][38]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
1994 "From Little Things Big Things Grow"[nb 12] Heritage Award Won
1999 "Until Death Do Them Part"[nb 13] Song of the Year Nominated
2003 "Wish I Was a Train"[nb 2] Vocal Collaboration of the Year Won
2006 "You're Learning"[nb 14] Vocal Collaboration of the Year Nominated
"Lonesome but Free"[nb 15] APRA Song of the Year Won
"Song of the Old Rake"[nb 14] APRA Song of the Year Nominated
Male Vocalist of the Year Nominated
Video Clip of the Year Won
Foggy Highway[nb 14] Album of the Year Nominated
Top Selling Album of the Year Nominated
"Rally Around the Drum"[nb 14] Heritage Song of the Year Won
2009 "Still Here"[nb 16] Vocal Collaboration of the Year Won

Australian Entertainment Awards (Mo Awards)

The Mo Awards are the annual Australian entertainment industry awards, and recognise achievements by performers in live entertainment in Australia since 1975.[43] The award categories are reviewed and in 2008 were: Musical Theatre, Opera, Classical, Comedy, Country and Variety.[43] In 1989 and 1990, they included a Rock category, Paul Kelly won four Mo Awards, twice as Male Rock Performer and twice as leader of Paul Kelly and the Messengers to win the Rock Group award.[44][45]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
1989 Paul Kelly Male Rock Performer Won
Paul Kelly and the Messengers Rock Group Won
1990 Paul Kelly Male Rock Performer Won
Paul Kelly and the Messengers Rock Group Won

Order of Australia

The Order of Australia was established on 14 February 1975 to honour Australian citizens and other persons for achievement or meritorious service.

Year Nominee/work Award Result
2017 Paul Maurice Kelly[46] Officer of the Order of Australia Honoured

Victorian Country Music Awards

These annual awards are presented by the Victorian Country Music Association. Paul Kelly won three awards for the 2000 album Smoke or one of its tracks "Until Death Do Them Part", all recorded by Paul Kelly with Uncle Bill.[47]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
2000 "Until Death Do Them Part"[nb 13] Victorian Group Won
Open Group Won
Smoke[nb 13] Victorian Album of the Year Won

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Video for "To Her Door" was directed by Claudia Castle.[15][16]
  2. ^ a b The nomination was shared with fellow composer / performer Christine Anu,[19] Anu and Kelly performed "Last Train" as a duet, the video was directed by Paul Elliot and Sally Bongers, Anu was also nominated as 'Best Breakthrough Artist' for the song.[20]
  3. ^ The nomination was for production work by Angelique Cooper including on "Last Train" by Anu and Kelly; Neil Murray's "Holy Road" (Remix); and Yothu Yindi's "World Turning" (Remix)
  4. ^ Nomination to Chris Dickie for engineering Kelly's "Tease Me - Tease Me", and Black Sorrows' songs "Chained to the Wheel", "Chosen Ones" and "New Craze".
  5. ^ a b The nominations / award are shared with fellow composers / performers, Stephen Hadley, Bruce Haymes, Peter Luscombe and Shane O'Mara;[21] who were also members of Paul Kelly Band and of Professor Ratbaggy.
  6. ^ Sensual Being was produced for Archie Roach, Kelly also produced Roach's 1990 album Charcoal Lane.
  7. ^ a b The nomination is shared with fellow composer / performer, Dan Luscombe,[22][23] also a member of Paul Kelly and the Boon Companions and of Stardust Five.
  8. ^ The nominations / award are shared with fellow composers / performers, James Ledger, Genevieve Lacey & ANAM Musicians.[24]
  9. ^ a b The award was shared with fellow songwriters of "Treaty", members of Yothu Yindi: Stuart Kellaway, Witiyana Marika, Milkayggu Mununggurr, Cal Williams, Gurrumul Yunupingu and Mandawuy Yunupingu;[5][6] who performed the song on their 1991 album Tribal Voice and released it as a single.
  10. ^ The nomination was shared with fellow songwriter of "I Wish I was a Train", Troy Cassar-Daley,[30] they also performed the song as a duet.
  11. ^ The award was shared with fellow composers / performers, Mairead Hannan, Kev Carmody, John Romeril, Deirdre Hannan, Alice Garner.[33]
  12. ^ The award was shared with fellow composer / performer Kev Carmody,[39] Carmody, Kelly and numerous other musicians performed "From Little Things Big Things Grow" on Carmody's 1993 album Bloodlines and it was also released as a single. Paul Kelly and the Messengers had recorded it earlier on their 1991 album Comedy.
  13. ^ a b c The nomination / awards were shared with fellow performers, members of Uncle Bill: Adam Gare, Gerry Hale, Peter Somerville and Stuart Speed.
  14. ^ a b c d The nominations / award are shared by Paul Kelly and the Stormwater Boys, members are: Kelly, Mick Albeck, James Gillard, Rod McCormack, Ian Simpson and Trev Warner. "You're Learning", "Song of the Old Rake" and "Rally Around the Drum" are songs on their 2005 album Foggy Highway. The video for "Song of the Old Rake" was directed by Nice Trees.
  15. ^ The award was shared with co-writer and performer Troy Cassar-Daley,[40][41] who won three other CMAA awards in 2006.
  16. ^ The award was shared with Melinda Schneider, who performed "Still Here" as a duet with Kelly, she was co-writer of "Still Here" with Jay Knowles.[42]

References

  1. ^ a b c McFarlane, Ian (1999). Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop. Allen & Unwin. ISBN 1-86448-768-2. Archived from the original on 2004-09-30. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  2. ^ a b c Holmgren, Magnus. "Paul Kelly". Australian Rock Database. Passagen.se (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 22 October 2013. Retrieved 21 March 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c ""To Her Door" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  4. ^ a b c ""To Her Door" at The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP)". ASCAP. Retrieved 2008-09-30. [dead link]
  5. ^ a b c ""Treaty" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  6. ^ a b c ""Treaty" at The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP)". American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. Retrieved 2008-09-30. [dead link]
  7. ^ a b Kruger, Debbie (2001-05-02). "The songs that resonate through the years" (PDF). Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  8. ^ a b c "ARIA 2008 Hall of Fame inductees listing". ARIA Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on 2008-08-02. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  9. ^ a b "Winners by Award: Hall of Fame". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 2 February 2009. Retrieved 25 August 2008. 
  10. ^ a b Ed Nimmervol (ed.). "Paul Kelly". Howlspace. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  11. ^ Marr, David (26 January 2012). "Brains Trump Brawn in Idealised Picture of an Outdoor Nation". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 13 May 2012. 
  12. ^ Furphy, Samuel. "Celebrating 50 Years – Australian of the Year Awards – History". Australian of the Year. National Australia Day Council. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2012. 
  13. ^ a b "Australian of the Year Awards – Victorian State Finalists – Paul Kelly". Australian of the Year. National Australia Day Council. 2012. Archived from the original on 13 May 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2012. 
  14. ^ a b ARIA Music Awards for Paul Kelly:
    • Search Results 'Paul Kelly': "Winners by Year: Search Results for 'Paul Kelly'". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
    • 1987 winners: "Winners by Year 1987". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
    • 1987 winners and nominees: "ARIA Awards 1987.mov". YouTube. ARIA Official YouTube Account (Australian Recording Industry Association). 13 November 2011. Retrieved 6 December 2013. 
    • 1988 winners: "Winners by Year 1988". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
    • 1988 winners and some nominees: Middleton, Karen (3 March 1988). "Music Awards: A Scratch on the Record". The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995). National Library of Australia. p. 23. Retrieved 6 December 2013. 
    • 1993 winners and nominees: "Winners by Year 1993". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 14 December 2007. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
    • 1994 winners and nominees: "Winners by Year 1994". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • Producer of the Year: "17th Annual ARIA Awards". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 23 February 2004. Retrieved 6 December 2013.  Note: User may be required to access archived information by selecting 'The History', then 'By Award', 'Producer of the Year' and 'Option Show Nominations'.
    • 1995 winners and nominees: "Winners by Year 1995". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
    • 1996 winners and nominees: "Winners by Year 1996". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 14 December 2007. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
    • 1997 winners and nominees: "Winners by Year 1997". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • 1998 winners and nominees: "Winners by Year 1998". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 27 September 2011. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • 1999 winners and nominees: "Winners by Year 1999". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 3 October 2008. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
    • 2000 winners and nominees: "Winners By Year 2000". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • 2001 winners and nominees: "Winners By Year 2001". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • 2002 winners and nominees: "Winners By Year 2002". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • 2004 winners and nominees: "Winners By Year 2004". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 4 March 2008. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • 2005 winners and nominees: "Winners By Year 2005". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • 2006 winners and nominees: "Winners By Year 2006". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 12 December 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • 2007 winners and nominees: "Winners By Year 2007". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 18 November 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • 2008 winners and nominees: "Winners By Year 2008". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 13 August 2009. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
    • 2013 winners and nominees: "Winners By Year 2013". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
    • 2014 winners: "And the ARIA Award Goes To...". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 27 November 2014. Retrieved 30 November 2014. 
    • 2014 winners and nominees: "Winners by Year 2014". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Retrieved 12 December 2015. 
    • 2015 winners: "And the ARIA Awards Goes to...". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 27 November 2015. Retrieved 12 December 2015. 
  15. ^ "1988: 2nd Annual ARIA Awards". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 19 May 2011. Retrieved 2008-09-26. 
  16. ^ Garcia, Alex S. (2008). "Paul Kelly - artist videography". mvdbase.com. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  17. ^ "[ARIA AWARDS] : [1989, 3RD, SYDNEY]". Australian Record Industry Association. Video recording of 3rd ARIA Awards (available from the National Film and Sound Archive, title no. 1241401). 6 March 1989. 
  18. ^ The ARIA Awards Album - Winners and Nominees (liner notes). CBS Productions Pty Limited in conjunction with WEA, Festival, EMI, BMG. 1990. CBS 466884 2. 
  19. ^ ""Last Train" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  20. ^ "ARIA Awards 2008: History: Winners by Artist search result for Christine Anu". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 2011-05-19. Retrieved 2008-08-19. 
  21. ^ ""Lantana" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  22. ^ ""Jindabyne" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  23. ^ ""Jindabyne" at The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP)". American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. Retrieved 2008-09-30. [dead link]
  24. ^ "ARIA Noms + Fine Arts & Artisan Winners". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 14 October 2012. Retrieved 20 October 2013. 
  25. ^ "APRA Music Awards - Winners 1991". Australasian Performing Right Association. Archived from the original on 2008-07-23. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  26. ^ "APRA Music Awards - Nominations 1998". Australasian Performing Right Association. Archived from the original on 2008-07-22. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  27. ^ "APRA Music Awards - Winners 1999". Australasian Performing Right Association. Archived from the original on 2008-07-23. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  28. ^ "APRA Music Awards - Nominations 2004". Australasian Performing Right Association. Archived from the original on 2008-07-23. Retrieved 2008-08-21. 
  29. ^ "Paul Kelly to Be Honoured at 2011 APRA Music Awards". News. Country Music Association of Australia (CMAA). 19 May 2011. Retrieved 16 January 2012. 
  30. ^ ""I Wish I was a Train" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  31. ^ "2002 APRA-AGSC Screen Music Awards". Australian Television Information Archive. Retrieved 2008-08-21. 
  32. ^ "2007 APRA-AGSC Screen Music Awards". Australian Television Information Archive. Retrieved 2008-08-21. 
  33. ^ ""One Night the Moon" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  34. ^ "About the CMAA Country Music Awards of Australia". Country Music Association of Australia (CMAA). Archived from the original on 2008-07-19. Retrieved 2008-09-25. 
  35. ^ "CMAA Country Music Awards of Australia Winners Archive". Country Music Association of Australia. Archived from the original on 2008-07-19. Retrieved 2008-09-25. 
  36. ^ "Country Music Association of Australia (CMAA) 1990–1999". Country Music Association of Australia. Archived from the original on 2008-07-19. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  37. ^ "CMAA 2000–2008". Country Music Association of Australia. Archived from the original on 2008-07-19. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  38. ^ Brandle, Lars (2009-01-26). "Chambers, Nicholson, sweep CMAA Awards". billboard.biz. Retrieved 2009-01-28. 
  39. ^ ""From Little Things" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  40. ^ ""Lonesome but Free" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  41. ^ ""Lonesome but Free" at The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP)". American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. Retrieved 2008-09-30. [dead link]
  42. ^ ""Still Here" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-01-28. 
  43. ^ a b "Background info". Mo Awards. Archived from the original on 2006-08-19. Retrieved 2008-09-25. 
  44. ^ "Winners - 14th Mo Awards 1989". Mo Awards. Archived from the original on 2006-08-19. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  45. ^ "Winners - 15th Mo Awards 1990". Mo Awards. Archived from the original on 2006-08-19. Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
  46. ^ "Search Australian Honours: Kelly, Paul Maurice". It's an Honour. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (Government of Australia). Archived from the original on 26 January 2017. Retrieved 27 January 2017. For distinguished service to the performing arts and to the promotion of the national identity through contributions as a singer, songwriter and musician. 
  47. ^ "2000 - Victorian Country Music Awards". Not For Sale (NFS). Retrieved 2008-08-25. 
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