List of all-time NHL standings

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The following is a list of the all-time standings records for each of the 30 active National Hockey League (NHL) teams, beginning with the first NHL season (1917–18), and accurate as of the end of the 2015–16 NHL season.[1] Teams are sorted by the overall percentage of points accumulated out of points available (2 times the number of games played) throughout NHL history. In the NHL's standings system, a team is awarded 2 points for a win (regardless if earned in regulation or overtime), 1 point for a tie, 1 point for an overtime loss, and 0 points for a loss.[2]

The overtime loss statistic (abbreviated as OT or OTL) was introduced into the NHL's standings in the 1999–00 season.[3] The term for the point in standings awarded to a team for an overtime loss is the Bettman point,[4] named after Gary Bettman, the NHL Commissioner at the time of its introduction.[5] It is more commonly referred to as a loser point by media outlets and fans alike.[2][4]

As a result of the 2004–05 NHL lockout, which canceled the entire 2004–05 season, the league adopted a shootout featuring shots on goals, in order to determine the winner of a game which is still tied after an overtime period.[6] This adoption, introduced in the 2005–06 season, eliminated ties from the game.[7]

Regular season

Logo of the Montreal Canadiens, the NHL leader in terms of games (tied with Toronto Maple Leafs), wins, ties, points, and point percentage, as of the end of the 2016–17 season.
Dustin Byfuglien (pictured in 2013) of the Winnipeg Jets, the team with the lowest point percentage in NHL history, as of the end of the 2016–17 season.

As of the end of 2016–17 NHL season, the Montreal Canadiens and Toronto Maple Leafs are tied for the most games played in the NHL, with 6,496 games.[1] The Canadiens additionally lead all NHL franchises in wins (3,345), ties (837), points (7,661), and point percentage (.590).[1] The Maple Leafs additionally lead all NHL franchises in losses (2,736).[1] Being the most recently established teams in the NHL, the Columbus Blue Jackets and Minnesota Wild are tied for fewest games played among all NHL franchises (1,278).[1] The Blue Jackets also have the fewest number of wins (535), ties (33), and points (1,224). The Winnipeg Jets have the lowest point percentage in NHL history (.474).[1] The Minnesota Wild have the fewest number of total losses (494).[1] In terms of overtime losses, the Florida Panthers have recorded the most (173), while the Colorado Avalanche have recorded the least (107).[1]

Rank Team First NHL season GP Won Lost Tied OTL Points PTS% Ref.
1 Vegas Golden Knights 2017–18 34 23 9 0 2 48 .706 [8]
2 Montreal Canadiens 1917–18 6,496 3,345 2,180 837 134 7,661 .590 [9]
3 Philadelphia Flyers 1967–68 3,882 1,934 1,345 457 146 4,471 .576 [10]
4 Boston Bruins 1924–25 6,336 3,065 2,329 791 151 7,072 .558 [11]
5 Nashville Predators 1998–99 1,442 686 560 60 136 1,456 .544 [12]
6 Minnesota Wild 2000–01 1,278 607 494 55 122 1,391 .544 [13]
7 Anaheim Ducks[a] 1993–94 1,820 865 709 107 139 1,976 .543 [15]
8 Buffalo Sabres 1970–71 3,656 1,702 1,415 409 130 3,943 .539 [16]
9 Detroit Red Wings[b] 1926–27 6,270 2,891 2,419 815 145 6,742 .538 [20]
10 Calgary Flames[c] 1972–73 3,500 1,616 1,382 379 123 3,734 .533 [22]
11 San Jose Sharks 1991–92 1,984 929 802 121 132 2,111 .532 [23]
12 St. Louis Blues 1967–68 3,882 1,771 1,546 432 133 4,107 .529 [24]
13 Washington Capitals 1974–75 3,334 1,526 1,380 303 135 3,490 .522 [25]
14 Ottawa Senators 1992–93 1,904 866 788 115 135 1,982 .520 [26]
15 Edmonton Oilers[d] 1979–80 2,944 1,326 1,215 262 141 3,055 .519 [29]
16 Colorado Avalanche[e] 1979–80 2,994 1,342 1,234 261 107 3,052 .518 [31]
17 Dallas Stars[f] 1967–68 3,882 1,697 1,601 459 125 3,978 .513 [32]
18 New York Rangers 1926–27 6,270 2,753 2,590 808 119 6,433 .513 [33]
19 Pittsburgh Penguins 1967–68 3,882 1,735 1,640 383 124 3,977 .512 [34]
20 Toronto Maple Leafs[g] 1917–18 6,496 2,834 2,736 783 143 6,594 .508 [37]
21 New York Islanders 1972–73 3,500 1,538 1,483 347 132 3,555 .508 [38]
22 Chicago Blackhawks[h] 1926–27 6,270 2,687 2,633 814 136 6,324 .504 [40]
23 New Jersey Devils[i] 1974–75 3,334 1,412 1,473 328 131 3,283 .491 [42]
24 Florida Panthers 1993–94 1,820 737 768 142 173 1,789 .491 [43]
25 Los Angeles Kings 1967–68 3,882 1,628 1,695 424 135 3,815 .491 [44]
26 Vancouver Canucks 1970–71 3,656 1,524 1,614 391 127 3,566 .488 [45]
27 Tampa Bay Lightning 1992–93 1,904 790 870 112 132 1,824 .479 [46]
28 Columbus Blue Jackets 2000–01 1,278 535 589 33 121 1,224 .479 [47]
29 Arizona Coyotes[j] 1979–80 2,994 1,210 1,337 266 131 2,817 .478 [51]
30 Carolina Hurricanes[k] 1979–80 2,994 1,205 1,333 263 143 2,816 .478 [53]
31 Winnipeg Jets[l][j] 1999–00 1,360 558 628 45 129 1,290 .474 [55]

Playoffs

Statue of Wayne Gretzky of the Edmonton Oilers, who have the highest playoff winning percentage in NHL history.
Blake Wheeler of the Winnipeg Jets, who have the lowest playoff winning percentage in NHL history.

The Stanley Cup Playoffs predate the National Hockey League's founding, and thus for the purpose of this listing, playoffs win–loss records prior to the 1918 Stanley Cup playoffs, which ended the 1917–18 NHL season, are not accounted for. As of the end of the 2017 Stanley Cup playoffs, which ended the 2016–17 NHL season, the Montreal Canadiens lead all active NHL teams in playoffs appearances, having appeared in 83 of their 99 seasons played in the NHL,[1] and playoff games played, with 729.[9] The Canadiens additionally lead all NHL teams in wins (422).[9] The Edmonton Oilers lead all NHL teams, in terms of playoff winning percentage, as their 159–105 (.602) record is the highest.[29] The Winnipeg Jets, being one of the more recently established NHL teams, have the fewest number of playoff games played (8).[55] The Jets also have the lowest playoff winning percentage, having lost all 8 of their playoff games, registering a .000 record.[55] Additionally, the Boston Bruins lead all NHL franchises in playoff losses (308).[11]

Rank Team Last playoffs
appearance
GP Won Lost Win% Ref.
1 Edmonton Oilers[d] 2016–17 264 159 105 .602 [29]
2 Montreal Canadiens 2016–17 729 422 307 .579 [9]
3 Anaheim Ducks[a] 2016–17 158 89 69 .563 [15]
4 Pittsburgh Penguins 2016–17 365 200 165 .548 [34]
5 New York Islanders 2015–16 264 144 120 .545 [38]
6 New Jersey Devils[i] 2011–12 254 136 118 .535 [42]
7 Tampa Bay Lightning 2015–16 116 62 54 .534 [46]
8 Colorado Avalanche[e] 2013–14 256 135 121 .527 [31]
9 Detroit Red Wings[b] 2015–16 621 325 296 .523 [20]
10 Philadelphia Flyers 2015–16 427 219 208 .513 [10]
11 Dallas Stars[f] 2015–16 326 163 163 .500 [32]
12 Chicago Blackhawks[h] 2016–17 534 264 270 .494 [40]
13 Boston Bruins 2016–17 609 301 308 .494 [11]
14 San Jose Sharks 2016–17 211 103 108 .488 [23]
15 Buffalo Sabres 2010–11 256 124 132 .484 [16]
16 New York Rangers 2016–17 507 244 263 .481 [33]
17 Toronto Maple Leafs[g] 2016–17 523 250 273 .478 [37]
18 Ottawa Senators 2016–17 151 72 79 .477 [26]
19 Carolina Hurricanes[k] 2008–09 127 59 68 .465 [53]
20 Washington Capitals 2016–17 251 116 135 .462 [25]
21 Nashville Predators 2016–17 92 42 50 .457 [12]
22 St. Louis Blues 2016–17 365 164 201 .449 [24]
23 Calgary Flames[c] 2016–17 223 99 124 .444 [22]
24 Vancouver Canucks 2014–15 229 101 128 .441 [45]
25 Los Angeles Kings 2015–16 251 111 149 .427 [44]
26 Florida Panthers 2015–16 44 18 26 .409 [43]
27 Minnesota Wild 2016–17 68 25 43 .368 [13]
28 Arizona Coyotes[j] 2011–12 119 41 78 .345 [51]
29 Columbus Blue Jackets 2016–17 15 3 12 .200 [47]
30 Winnipeg Jets[l][j] 2014–15 8 0 8 .000 [55]

Notes

  1. ^ a b The Anaheim Ducks first played as the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim from 1993–94 to 2005–06, before adopting the Anaheim Ducks name in 2006–07.[14]
  2. ^ a b The Detroit Red Wings first played as the Detroit Cougars from 1926–27 to 1929–30,[17] and as the Detroit Falcons from 1930–31 to 1931–32, before adopting the Red Wings name in 1932–33.[18][19]
  3. ^ a b The Calgary Flames first played as the Atlanta Flames from 1972–73 to 1979–80, before adopting the Calgary Flames name in 1980–81, upon their relocation to Calgary.[21]
  4. ^ a b The Edmonton Oilers first played in 1972–73 as the Alberta Oilers in the World Hockey Association (WHA).[27] The team adopted the Edmonton Oilers name in 1973–74.[27] Their WHA records accumulated prior to the 1979 NHL–WHA merger are not officially accounted for by the NHL.[28] After the merger, the team has kept playing with this name.[27]
  5. ^ a b The Colorado Avalanche first played in 1972–73 as the Quebec Nordiques in the World Hockey Association (WHA).[30] Their WHA records accumulated prior to the 1979 NHL–WHA merger are not officially accounted for by the NHL.[28] After the merger, the team would continue playing as the Quebec Nordiques from 1979–80 to 1994–95. The team has played as the Colorado Avalanche since their relocation to Colorado prior to the 1995–96 season.[30]
  6. ^ a b The Dallas Stars first played as the Minnesota North Stars from 1967–68 to 1992–93.[27] They have played as the Dallas Stars since their relocation to Dallas prior to the 1993–94 season.[27]
  7. ^ a b The Toronto Maple Leafs first played without an official nickname and were referred to as the Toronto Hockey Club during the 1917–18 season, before being formally dubbed the Toronto Arenas, a name the team would play under during the 1918–19 season.[35] The team then played as the Toronto St. Patricks from 1919–20 to 1926–27.[36] Since the 1927–28 season, the team has played with the Maple Leafs name.[27]
  8. ^ a b The Chicago Blackhawks' team name was spelled as "Black Hawks" from 1926–27 to 1985–86, and prior to the 1986–87 season, the name was officially changed to the compound "Blackhawks" spelling.[39]
  9. ^ a b The New Jersey Devils first played as the Kansas City Scouts from 1974–75 to 1975–76.[41] The team then relocated to Denver and played as the Colorado Rockies from 1976–77 to 1981–82.[41] After relocating from Denver to New Jersey, the team has played as the New Jersey Devils since the 1982–83 season.[36]
  10. ^ a b c d The Arizona Coyotes first played as the Winnipeg Jets in 1972–73, as part of the World Hockey Association (WHA).[48] Although WHA records are not officially accounted for by the NHL,[28] the Coyotes retain the records from their 1979–80 season, after the NHL–WHA merger, until the original Jets' final season (1995–96) in Winnipeg.[49] After their relocation to Arizona, the team played as the Phoenix Coyotes from 1996–97 to 2013–14, before adopting the Arizona Coyotes name in 2014–15.[50]
  11. ^ a b The Carolina Hurricanes first played in 1972–73 as the New England Whalers in the World Hockey Association (WHA).[52] They relocated to Hartford in 1974, but kept the New England Whalers name.[52] Their WHA records are not officially accounted for by the NHL.[28] When the NHL and WHA merged in 1979, the team was renamed as the Hartford Whalers, which they would play as from 1979–80 to 1996–97.[52] The team has played as the Carolina Hurricanes since their relocation to North Carolina prior to the 1997–98 season.[52]
  12. ^ a b The Winnipeg Jets first played as the Atlanta Thrashers from 1999–00 to 2010–11.[54] The team has played as the Winnipeg Jets since their relocation to Winnipeg prior to the 2011–12 season.[54] This Winnipeg franchise retains the franchise history of the Thrashers as their own, while the Arizona Coyotes retain the history of the original Winnipeg Jets.[49]

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