List of Nobel laureates affiliated with Princeton University

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Sixty-three Nobel laureates have been affiliated with Princeton University. The building pictured is Nassau Hall.

This list of Nobel laureates affiliated with Princeton University comprehensively shows the Princeton-affiliated individual winners of the Nobel Prize and the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences since 1901. The Nobel Prizes are awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the Karolinska Institute, and the Norwegian Nobel Committee to individuals who make outstanding contributions in the fields of chemistry, physics, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine.[1] They were established by the 1895 will of Alfred Nobel, which dictates that the awards should be administered by the Nobel Foundation. Another prize, the "Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel" (commonly known as the Nobel Economics Prize), was established in 1968 (first awarded in 1969) by the Sveriges Riksbank, the central bank of Sweden, for contributors to the field of economics.[2]

As of March 2018, 63 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with Princeton University, and 42 of them are officially listed as "Princeton's Nobel Laureates" by Princeton University for being alumni or having "performed their award-winning work at Princeton, were employed by Princeton when they received their award, or are currently working at the University".[3] Among the laureates, 18 are Princeton alumni (graduates and attendees), and 25 have been long-term academic members of the Princeton faculty. Subject-wise, 26 laureates have won the Nobel Prize in Physics, more than any other subject. In addition, Woodrow Wilson, the former president of Princeton, was the first Princeton-affiliated laureate, winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 1919.[4] Four Nobel Prizes (same subject in the same year) were shared by Princeton laureates: James Cronin and Val Logsdon Fitch won the 1980 Nobel Prize in Physics,[5] Russell Alan Hulse and Joseph Hooton Taylor, Jr. won the 1993 Nobel Prize in Physics,[6] David Gross and Frank Wilczek won the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics,[7] and Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims won the 2011 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics.[8]

The university affiliations in this list are all official academic affiliations such as official academic employment and degree programs. Non-academic positions (e.g., advisory committee, administrative staff, etc) are generally excluded. The official academic affiliations fall into three categories: 1) Graduate and Attendee, 2) Long-term Academic Staff, and 3) Short-term Academic Staff. Graduates are defined as those who hold Bachelor's, Master's, PhD, or equivalent degrees from Princeton, while attendees are those who formally enrolled in a degree program at Princeton but did not complete the program (thus, honorary degrees, posthumous degrees, summer attendees, exchange students, and auditing students are generally excluded). The category of "Long-term Academic Staff" consists of tenure/tenure-track and equivalent academic positions, while that of "Short-term Academic Staff" consists of lecturers (without tenure), postdoctoral researchers (postdocs), visiting professors/scholars (visitors), and equivalent academic positions. At Princeton, the specific academic title solely determines the type of affiliation, regardless of the actual time the position was held by a laureate.

Further explanations on "visitors" under "Short-term Academic Staff" are presented as follows. 1) All informal/personal visits are excluded from the list; 2) all employment-based visiting positions, which carry teaching/research duties, are included as affiliations in the list; 3) as for award/honor-based visiting positions, this list takes a conservative view and includes the positions as affiliations only if the laureates were required to assume employment-level duty (teaching/research) or the laureates specifically classified the visiting positions as "affiliation/appointment/work" in their Curriculum Vita or reliable websites. To be specific, some award/honor-based visiting positions such as the "Belknap Visitor" program at Princeton University are awards/honors/recognition without employment-level duty.[9] For example, Nadine Gordimer (Nobel Prize in Literature 1991), being a Belknap Visitor in 1969, is thus excluded from the list.[10] In particular, attending meetings and giving public lectures, talks or non-curricular seminars at Princeton University is not a form of employment-level duty. Finally, summer visitors are generally excluded from the list unless summer work yielded significant end products such as research publications and components of Nobel-winning work, since summer terms are not part of formal academic years.

Princeton Nobel Laureates

Year Image Laureate Relation Category Rationale
1919 President Woodrow Wilson portrait December 2 1912.jpg Woodrow Wilson Class of 1879; member of the faculty and president emeritus of the University Peace 28th President of the United States; founder of the League of Nations.[4]
1927 Arthur Holly Compton.gif Arthur Compton
(shared with Charles Thomson Rees Wilson)
Ph.D., 1916 Physics "for his discovery of the effect named after him"[11]
1936 Eugene O'Neill 1936.jpg Eugene O'Neill Class of 1910 Literature "for the power, honesty and deep-felt emotions of his dramatic works, which embody an original concept of tragedy"[12]
1937 Clinton Davisson.jpg Clinton Davisson
(shared with George Paget Thomson)
Ph.D., 1911 Physics "for their experimental discovery of the diffraction of electrons by crystals"[13]
1945 Pauli.jpg Wolfgang Pauli
Professor at Institute for Advanced Study Physics "for the discovery of the Exclusion Principle, also called the Pauli Principle"[14]
1951 Edwin McMillan
(shared with Glenn T. Seaborg)
Ph.D., 1933 Chemistry "for their discoveries in the chemistry of transuranium elements"[15]
1956 Bardeen.jpg John Bardeen
(shared with William Shockley and Walter Houser Brattain)
Ph.D., 1936 Physics "for their researches on semiconductors and their discovery of the transistor effect"[16]
1961 Robert Hofstadter.jpg Robert Hofstadter
(shared with Rudolf Mössbauer)
Ph.D., 1938 Physics "for his pioneering studies of electron scattering in atomic nuclei and for his thereby achieved discoveries concerning the structure of the nucleons"[17]
1963 Wigner.jpg Eugene Wigner Jones Professor of Mathematical Physics Physics "for his contributions to the theory of the atomic nucleus and the elementary particles, particularly through the discovery and application of fundamental symmetry principles"[18]
1965 RichardFeynman-PaineMansionWoods1984 copyrightTamikoThiel bw.jpg Richard Feynman
(shared with Sin-Itiro Tomonaga and Julian Schwinger)
Ph.D., 1942 Physics "for their fundamental work in quantum electrodynamics, with deep-ploughing consequences for the physics of elementary particles"[19]
1977 Andersonphoto.jpg Philip Warren Anderson
(shared with Nevill Francis Mott and John Hasbrouck Van Vleck)
Joseph Henry Professor of Physics Physics "for their fundamental theoretical investigations of the electronic structure of magnetic and disordered systems"[20]
1978 Arno Penzias.jpg Arno Allan Penzias
(shared with Pyotr Kapitsa and Robert Woodrow Wilson)
Visiting lecturer with rank of professor Physics "for their discovery of cosmic microwave background radiation"[21]
1979 Arthur Lewis
(shared with Theodore Schultz)
James Madison Professor of Political Economy Economics "for their pioneering research into economic development research with particular consideration of the problems of developing countries."[22]
1979 Steven-weinberg.jpg Steven Weinberg
(shared with Sheldon Lee Glashow and Abdus Salam)
Ph.D., 1957 Physics "for their contributions to the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interaction between elementary particles, including, inter alia, the prediction of the weak neutral current"[23]
1980 James Watson Cronin 2006.jpg James Cronin
(shared with Val Logsdon Fitch)
Professor of physics Physics "for the discovery of violations of fundamental symmetry principles in the decay of neutral K-mesons"[5]
1980 Val Logsdon Fitch
(shared with James Cronin)
Fogg Brackett Professor of Physics Physics "for the discovery of violations of fundamental symmetry principles in the decay of neutral K-mesons"[5]
1992 GaryBecker-May24-2008.jpg Gary Becker Class of 1951 Economics "for having extended the domain of microeconomic analysis to a wide range of human behaviour and interaction, including non-market behaviour."[24]
1993 Toni Morrison 2008-2.jpg Toni Morrison Robert F. Goheen Professor in the Humanities Literature "who in novels characterized by visionary force and poetic import, gives life to an essential aspect of American reality"[25]
1993 Russell Alan Hulse.jpg Russell Alan Hulse
(shared with Joseph Hooton Taylor, Jr.)
Principal research physicist, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Physics "for the discovery of a new type of pulsar, a discovery that has opened up new possibilities for the study of gravitation"[6]
1993 2008JosephTaylor.jpg Joseph Hooton Taylor, Jr.
(shared with Russell Alan Hulse)
James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Physics Physics "for the discovery of a new type of pulsar, a discovery that has opened up new possibilities for the study of gravitation"[6]
1994 John f nash 20061102 3.jpg John Forbes Nash
(shared with John Harsanyi and Reinhard Selten)
Ph.D., 1950, senior research mathematician Economics "for their pioneering analysis of equilibria in the theory of non-cooperative games."[26]
1995 Eric F. Wieschaus.jpg Eric F. Wieschaus
(shared with Edward B. Lewis and Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard)
Squibb Professor in Molecular Biology Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the genetic control of early embryonic development"[27]
1996 Richard Smalley.jpg Richard Smalley
(shared with Robert Curl and Harold Kroto)
Ph.D., 1974 Chemistry "for their discovery of fullerenes"[28]
1998 Daniel Chee Tsui
(shared with Robert B. Laughlin and Horst Ludwig Störmer)
Arthur Legrand Doty Professor of Electrical Engineering Physics "for their discovery of a new form of quantum fluid with fractionally charged excitations"[29]
2000 James Heckman.jpg James Heckman
(shared with Daniel McFadden)
M.A., 1968, Ph.D., 1971 Economics "for his development of theory and methods for analyzing selective samples."[30]
2001 A Michael Spence.jpg Michael Spence
(shared with George Akerlof and Joseph Stiglitz)
Class of 1966 Economics "for their analyses of markets with asymmetric information."[31]
2002 Daniel KAHNEMAN.jpg Daniel Kahneman
(shared with Vernon L. Smith)
Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology and professor of public affairs Economics "for having integrated insights from psychological research into economic science, especially concerning human judgment and decision-making under uncertainty."[32]
2004 David Gross cropped.JPG David Gross
(shared with H. David Politzer and Frank Wilczek)
Thomas Jones Professor of Mathematical Physics Emeritus Physics "for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction"[7]
2004 FrankStockholm2004.jpg Frank Wilczek
(shared with David Gross and H. David Politzer)
Ph.D., 1975 Physics "for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction"[7]
2007 Eric Maskin at UCI.jpg Eric Maskin
(shared with Leonid Hurwicz and Roger Myerson)
Visiting lecturer with the rank of professor of economics Economics "for having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory."[33]
2008 Osamu Shimomura-press conference Dec 06th, 2008-2.jpg Osamu Shimomura
(shared with Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien)
Research associate in biology Chemistry "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP"[34]
2008 Paul Krugman at the German National Library in Frankfurt.jpg Paul Krugman Professor of economics and international affairs Economics "for his analysis of trade patterns and location of economic activity."[35]
2010 Mario Vargas Llosa (2010).jpg Mario Vargas Llosa Visiting professor of Latin American Studies Literature "for his cartography of structures of power and his trenchant images of the individual's resistance, revolt, and defeat"[36]
2011 Nobel Prize 2011-Press Conference KVA-DSC 7770.jpg Thomas Sargent
(shared with Christopher Sims)
Visiting professor of economics Economics "for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy"[8]
2011 Nobel Prize 2011-Press Conference KVA-DSC 7720.jpg Christopher Sims
(shared with Thomas Sargent)
Harold B. Helms Professor of Economics Economics "for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy"[8]
2012 Lloyd Shapley 2 2012.jpg Lloyd Shapley
(shared with Alvin E. Roth)
Ph.D., 1953 Economics "for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design"[37]
2013 James Rothman
(shared with Randy Schekman and Thomas C. Südhof)
Squibb Professor in Molecular Biology[38] Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells"[39]
2015 Arthur B. McDonald 5193-2015.jpg Arthur B. McDonald
(shared with Takaaki Kajita)
Professor of Physics Physics "for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass"[40]
2015 Tomas Lindahl
(shared with Paul L. Modrich and Aziz Sancar)
Postdoctoral researcher Chemistry "for mechanistic studies of DNA repair"[41]
2015 Angus Deaton 5289-2015.jpg Angus Deaton Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of Economics and International Affairs Economics "for his analysis of consumption, poverty, and welfare"[42]
2016 Duncan Haldane
(shared with David Thouless and J. Michael Kosterlitz)
Eugene Higgins Professor of Physics Physics "for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter"[43]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Alfred Nobel – The Man Behind the Nobel Prize". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  2. ^ "The Nobel Prize". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  3. ^ "Honors & Awards". Princeton University. Retrieved 2018-04-06. 
  4. ^ a b "Nobel Peace Prize 1919". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  5. ^ a b c "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1980". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  6. ^ a b c "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1993". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  7. ^ a b c "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2004". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  8. ^ a b c "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2011". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2011-11-18. 
  9. ^ "William Kentridge Lecture". Lewis Center for the Arts. Retrieved 2018-04-06. 
  10. ^ "Nadine Gordimer Biography". biography.jrank.org. Retrieved 2018-04-06. 
  11. ^ "Nobel Prize in Physics 1927". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  12. ^ "Nobel Prize in Literature 1936". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  13. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1937". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  14. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1945". Nobel Foundation. 
  15. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1951". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  16. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1956". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  17. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1961". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  18. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1963". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  19. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1965". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  20. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1977". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  21. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1978". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  22. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1979". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  23. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1979". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  24. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1992". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  25. ^ "Nobel Prize in Literature 1993". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  26. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1994". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  27. ^ "Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1995". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  28. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1996". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  29. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1998". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  30. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2000". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  31. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2001". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  32. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2002". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  33. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2007". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  34. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2008". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  35. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2008". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-14. 
  36. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Literature 2010". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2011-11-18. 
  37. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2012". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2011-11-18. 
  38. ^ James Rothman profile, Yale School of Medicine. Accessed 2013–11–23.
  39. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2011-11-18. 
  40. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2015". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2015-10-05. 
  41. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2015". Nobelprize.org. Retrieved 2016-01-10. 
  42. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2015". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2016-01-10. 
  43. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2016". Nobelprize.org. Retrieved 2016-10-07. 

External links

  • Official website of Princeton University
  • Official website of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
  • Official website of the Nobel Foundation

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