List of Metroid media

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Boxes of the Metroid games, plus a Samus bobblehead figurine, and a T-shirt in its package.
Packaging for all Metroid games released prior to Metroid Prime 3: Corruption

Metroid is a video game series published by Nintendo and primarily produced by the company's first-party developers, though second-party Fuse Games and third-party Team Ninja have also developed for the series. It debuted in Japan with Metroid (メトロイド, Metoroido) on August 6, 1986, and was later released in North America (August 1987) and PAL regions (January 15, 1988). All Metroid video games have been developed exclusively for Nintendo video game consoles and handhelds, dating from the Nintendo Entertainment System to the current generation of video game consoles. The franchise consists of eleven video games, the latest of which is Metroid: Other M for the Wii. Comics and manga adaptations, and video game soundtracks released on audio CDs are also available and occasionally figurines.

The series revolves around Samus Aran, a bounty hunter who protects the galaxy from the Space Pirates and their attempts to harness the power of fictional organisms, especially the eponymous Metroids. The series' gameplay contains elements from shooter, platforming, and adventure games. It is known for its non-linear progression and solitary exploration.[1] The 2D Metroid games are side-scrollers, and the 3D Metroid Prime series gives the player a first-person perspective,[1] while Other M is a third-person shooter with the ability to switch to first-person view.[2] Metroid is one of Nintendo's most successful franchises, with over 17.44 million units sold by September 2012.[3] The games have received varying levels of critical acclaim,[1] while the most recent game Other M has met with polarizing reviews.[4] A side-story to the Metroid Prime trilogy, Metroid Prime: Federation Force, has been announced for a 3DS release in 2016, and is confirmed to be optimized for the New 3DS in a similar manner to The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask 3D and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS. Shinya Takahashi, the general manager of the Nintendo Software Planning & Development, previously stated that Nintendo has plans for 2D and 3D Metroid titles "in the near future".[5]

Video games

Metroid series

Title Details

Original release date(s):
Release years by system:
1986 – Famicom Disk System[6]
1987 – Nintendo Entertainment System[6]
2004 – Game Boy Advance[8]
2007 – Wii Virtual Console[9]
2012 – 3DS Virtual Console[10]
Notes:



Original release date(s):[13][14][15]
  • NA: November 1991
  • JP: January 21, 1992
  • PAL: May 21, 1992
Release years by system:
1991 – Game Boy[13]
2011 – 3DS Virtual Console[16]
Notes:
  • First handheld Metroid title
  • A special color palette used for the game was added to the Game Boy Color hardware[17]
  • Nintendo considered a remake for the Game Boy Advance[1]
  • See AM2R for fan-made remake.



Original release date(s):[18]
  • JP: March 19, 1994
  • NA: April 18, 1994
  • PAL: July 28, 1994
Release years by system:
1994 – Super Nintendo Entertainment System[18]
2007 – Wii Virtual Console[9]
2013 – Wii U Virtual Console[9]
2016 - 3DS Virtual Console (New Nintendo 3DS model only)
Notes:



Original release date(s):[20]
  • NA: November 17, 2002
  • PAL: November 22, 2002
  • JP: February 14, 2003
Release years by system:
2002 – Game Boy Advance[20]
2011 – 3DS Virtual Console[21][22]
2014 – Wii U Virtual Console[23]
Notes:
  • Japanese version had adjustable difficulty levels, international versions featured a single difficulty[24]
  • Released simultaneously with Metroid Prime in North America



Original release date(s):[25]
  • NA: February 9, 2004
  • PAL: April 8, 2004
  • JP: May 27, 2004
Release years by system:
2004 – Game Boy Advance[25]
Notes:
  • Remake of Metroid, with improved graphics, new gameplay features and areas to explore; also has the original game as an unlockable extra[26]



Original release date(s):[27]
  • NA: August 31, 2010
  • JP: September 2, 2010
  • PAL: September 3, 2010
Release years by system:
2010 – Wii[27]
Notes:



Original release date(s):[28][29]
  • NA: September 15, 2017
Release years by system:
2017 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Remake of Metroid II: Return of Samus


Metroid Prime series

Title Details

Original release date(s):[30]
  • NA: November 17, 2002
  • JP: February 28, 2003
  • PAL: March 21, 2003
Release years by system:
2002 – GameCube[30]
2009 – Wii[31]
Notes:



Original release date(s):[34]
  • NA: November 15, 2004
  • EU: November 26, 2004
  • AU: December 2, 2004
  • JP: May 26, 2005
Release years by system:
2004 – GameCube[34]
2009 – Wii[31]
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Metroid Prime 2: Dark Echoes (メトロイドプライム2: ダークエコーズ, Metoroido Puraimu Tsū: Dāku Ekōzu)[35][36]
  • First game in the series with a multiplayer mode[37]
  • The PAL version lacks the standard 50 Hz mode and offers 60 Hz only[38]
  • Re-released for the Wii in the New Play Control! series of GameCube remakes in Japan and as part of Metroid Prime: Trilogy internationally[33]



Original release date(s):[39]
  • NA: October 24, 2005
  • AU: December 1, 2005
  • JP: January 19, 2006
  • EU: June 22, 2007
Release years by system:
2005 – Nintendo DS[39]
Notes:



Original release date(s):[42]
  • NA: March 20, 2006
  • EU: May 5, 2006
  • AU: May 25, 2006
  • JP: June 1, 2006
Release years by system:
2006 – Nintendo DS[42]
Notes:
  • Preceded by Metroid Prime Hunters: First Hunt, a multiplayer demo included as a pack-in (now discontinued) with the DS launch in all regions except Japan[43]
  • First game in the series with online multiplayer[44]
  • First Nintendo DS game to allow voice chat between players over the internet[45]



Original release date(s):[46]
  • NA: August 27, 2007
  • PAL: October 26, 2007
  • AU: November 8, 2007
  • JP: March 6, 2008
Release years by system:
2007 – Wii[46]
Notes:
  • The first Metroid game for the Wii
  • First game in the series to include a preview accessible online via a console[47]



Original release date(s):[48]
  • NA: August 24, 2009
  • EU: September 4, 2009
  • AU: October 15, 2009
Release years by system:
2009 – Wii[49]
Notes:
  • Contains Metroid Prime, Metroid Prime 2 and Metroid Prime 3, all with Wii Remote controls.[50]



Original release date(s):
  • NA: August 19, 2016
  • JP: August 25, 2016
  • EU: September 2, 2016
  • AU: September 3, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 - Nintendo 3DS[51]
Notes:
  • The first Metroid game for the Nintendo 3DS
  • Contains a game titled Metroid Prime: Blast Ball, a soccer-themed multiplayer minigame.[52]


Metroid Prime 4

Original release date(s):
Release years by system:
- Nintendo Switch[53]
Notes:
  • The first Metroid game for the Nintendo Switch


Soundtracks

Title Release date Length Label
Super Metroid – Sound in Action June 22, 1994[54] 58:49 Sony Records
Notes:
Metroid Prime & Fusion Original Soundtracks June 18, 2003[57] 2:12:00 Scitron
Notes:

Printed media

Comic books

Game Company Publisher Release date
Metroid Valiant Comics Nintendo Comics System, Issue #2 July 1990[60]
Notes:
  • Consists of three short stories across one issue, themed after, but not directly adapting the game:[61]
    • The Coming of a Hero (2 pages), by George Caragonne, James Brock, Bob Layton, Jade, Kathryn Bolinger
    • Metroid (1 page), by George Caragonne, Mickey Ritter, Jan Harpes, Jade
    • Deceit Du Jour (10 pages), by Mark McClellan and Bill Vallely, Vince Mielcarek, Bob Layton, Jade, Joe Q and The Gradations
Super Metroid Nintendo Nintendo Power, Issues #57–61 February–May 1994[62]
Notes:
Metroid Prime Dreamwave Productions Nintendo Power, Issues #164–166 January–March 2003
Notes:
  • Two-part adaptation of game[64]
  • Written by Kato Li (script), Sigmund Torre (art, with one page by Pat Lee), Gary Yeung and Alan Wang (colors)

Manga

Game Publisher Release date
Metroid Wanpakku Comics 1986
Notes:
  • 195 page Manga/Strategy Guide, released only in Japan.[65]
Super Metroid Shounen Oh Game Comic, Issue #1 August 1994
Notes:
  • 18-page adaptation, consisting of comedic strips with four panels[66]
Metroid Magazine Z November 2003[67]–May 2004[68]
Notes:
  • Two-volume manga, tells the backstory of Samus Aran, written by Kouji Tazawa (script) and Kenji Ishikawa (art).[67][68]
  • The first two chapters of Volume 1 received an online version with color and sound effects.[69][70]
Metroid Prime 2: Echoes Comic Bom Bom July 2005–January 2006
Notes:
  • Adaptation of the game, written by Hisashi Matsumoto across seven issues of the magazine[71]
Samus and Joey Comic Bom Bom
Notes:
  • 5 part manga involving the adventures of Samus Aran and a boy called Joey from a frontier planet[72]

References

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  2. ^ Cabral, Matt (2010-02-24). "Metroid: Other M: A Change of Perspective". Kotaku. Retrieved 2014-05-04. 
  3. ^ Guinness World Records 2013: Gamer's Edition. Guinness World Records Ltd. 2012. p. 154. ISBN 9781904994954. 
  4. ^ Parish, Jeremy (2011-05-25). "Dial Other M for Murder: Is the Metroid Series Dead?". 1UP.com. News Corporation. Archived from the original on 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2014-05-04. 
  5. ^ Totilo, Stephen (2014-06-12). "Nintendo Is Planning A Future For Both 2D And 3D Metroid". Kotaku. Retrieved 2014-08-01. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Release Information for Metroid". MobyGames. Retrieved January 7, 2009. 
  7. ^ "Metroid Release Summary". GameSpot. Retrieved December 26, 2008. 
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  9. ^ a b c Casamassina, Matt (August 10, 2007). "Metroid Classics for Wii". IGN. Retrieved December 26, 2008. 
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  11. ^ Varanini, Giancarlo (October 25, 2002). "Metroid Prime, Fusion connection revealed". GameSpot. Retrieved April 10, 2007. 
  12. ^ "Metroid Zero Mission Game Guide: Secrets". IGN. Retrieved January 13, 2008. 
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  14. ^ Sora Ltd. (2008-03-09). Super Smash Bros. Brawl. Wii. Nintendo. Level/area: Nintendo Chronicle. Game Boy — 11/1991 Metroid II: Return of Samus 
  15. ^ "Game Boy (original) Games" (PDF). Nintendo of America. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2008-10-03. Retrieved 2012-10-18. 
  16. ^ "任天堂の3DSバーチャルコンソールサイト" (in Japanese). Nintendo Co., Ltd. Archived from the original on 2011-10-31. Retrieved 2011-11-02. 
  17. ^ TJ Rappel. "The MDb Interviews Dan Owsen". The Metroid Database. Retrieved June 29, 2006. Dan: Well, since R&D 1 was involved in the development of Game Boy color, I think they were able to put a special "Metroid palette" in the GBC hardware. This makes Metroid II look really, really nice on Game Boy Color. In fact, it looks a lot like the NES game on GBC 
  18. ^ a b c "Super Metroid release data". GameFAQs. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 2014-05-19. 
  19. ^ Sakurai, Masahiro (2008-01-25). "Masterpieces". Smash Bros. Dojo!!. Retrieved 2013-04-17. 
  20. ^ a b "Metroid Fusion Release Summary". GameSpot. Archived from the original on February 12, 2009. Retrieved December 26, 2008. 
  21. ^ Thomas, Lucas M. (2011-07-29). "Nintendo's 3DS Ambassador Program: Behold Your Rewards". IGN. Retrieved 2011-08-20. 
  22. ^ "Nintendo Power Vol. 271". Future. 2011-08-31. 
  23. ^ Hinkle, David. "Wii U Virtual Console gets first Game Boy Advance games in April". Joystiq. 
  24. ^ "Hints and Secrets - Metroid Fusion". GameSpy. Archived from the original on February 7, 2009. Retrieved January 27, 2009. 
  25. ^ a b "Metroid: Zero Mission Release Summary". GameSpot. Archived from the original on February 15, 2009. Retrieved December 26, 2008. 
  26. ^ Lee, Justin (February 2, 2004). "Metroid Creator Talks Zero Mission". GameSpy. Archived from the original on February 26, 2009. Retrieved February 16, 2009. 
  27. ^ a b c McElroy, Justin (2009-06-02). "Team Ninja collaborating with Nintendo on Metroid Other M". Joystiq. Retrieved 2009-06-02. 
  28. ^ Pereira, Chris (13 June 2017). "E3 2017: Metroid 2 Remake Samus Returns Announced For 3DS". GameSpot. Retrieved 13 June 2017. 
  29. ^ Byford, Sam (June 13, 2017). "Nintendo brings back 2D Metroid with Samus Returns for 3DS". The Verge. Retrieved June 13, 2017. 
  30. ^ a b "Metroid Prime Release Summary". GameSpot. Retrieved December 26, 2008. 
  31. ^ a b Tanaka, John (October 2, 2008). "First Look: Wii de Asobu Pikmin". IGN. Retrieved January 7, 2009. 
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  35. ^ メトロイド プライム2 ダークエコーズ オフィシャルサイト [METROID PRIME2 DARK ECHOES OFFICIAL SITE] (in Japanese). Nintendo. Retrieved 2013-03-01. 
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  39. ^ a b "Metroid Prime Pinball Release Summary". GameSpot. Retrieved December 26, 2008. 
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  46. ^ a b "Metroid Prime 3: Corruption Release Summary". GameSpot. Retrieved December 26, 2008. 
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  48. ^ "Metroid Prime Trilogy at Nintendo". Nintendo. Retrieved 2009-05-22. 
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  54. ^ "Super Metroid – Sound in Action". Play-Asia. Retrieved January 5, 2009. 
  55. ^ Nintendo R&D1 (August 6, 1986). Metroid. Nintendo Entertainment System. Nintendo. 
  56. ^ Nintendo R&D1 (March 19, 1994). Super Metroid. Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Nintendo. 
  57. ^ "Metroid Prime & Fusion Original Soundtracks". CD Japan. Retrieved February 28, 2009. 
  58. ^ Retro Studios (November 15, 2002). Metroid Prime. GameCube. Nintendo. 
  59. ^ Nintendo R&D1 (November 15, 2002). Metroid Fusion. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  60. ^ "Nintendo Comics System Comic Books". Valiant Comics. Retrieved February 17, 2009. 
  61. ^ "Metroid Checklist". Valiant Comics. Retrieved February 1, 2009. 
  62. ^ Itoh, Benimaru (February–May 2004). "Super Metroid". Nintendo Power (57–61). ISSN 1041-9551. Archived from the original on 2009-07-09. 
  63. ^ Oxford, Nadia (September 30, 2004). "Funny Pages: Games as Comics, Past and Present". 1UP.com. Retrieved January 25, 2009. 
  64. ^ "Metroid Prime". Nintendo Power. Dreamwave Productions (164–167). January–March 2003. ISSN 1041-9551. 
  65. ^ "Manga/Strategy Guide". Metroid (メトロイド). Wanpakku Comics. 1986. 
  66. ^ "Super Metroid (スーパーメトロイド)". Shounen Oh Game Comic. Shounen Oh Comics. Kobunsha. August 1994. Archived from the original on 2009-07-09. 
  67. ^ a b "Part 1" (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved February 4, 2009. 
  68. ^ a b "Part 2" (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved February 1, 2009. 
  69. ^ "Part 1" (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved February 4, 2009. [permanent dead link]
  70. ^ "Part 2" (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved December 23, 2008. [permanent dead link]
  71. ^ "Metroid Prime (メトロイド プライム)". Comic Bom Bom. Kodansha. July 2005 – January 2006. OCLC 38107748. 
  72. ^ "Comics & Manga Listing". Metroid Database. Archived from the original on 2016-02-15. Retrieved 2016-02-03. 

External links

  • Official Metroid website
  • Metroid Comics and Manga at the Metroid Database
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