List of Local Nature Reserves in Hertfordshire

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hertfordshire is a county in eastern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire to the north, Cambridgeshire to the north-east, Essex to the east, Buckinghamshire to the west and Greater London to the south. The county town is Hertford. As of June 2014, the county has a population of 1,154,800[1] in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2).[2]

Local Nature Reserves (LNRs) are designated by local authorities under the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949. The local authority must have a legal control over the site, by owning or leasing it or having an agreement with the owner. LNRs are sites which have a special local interest either biologically or geologically, and local authorities have a duty to care for them. They can apply local bye-laws to manage and protect LNRs.[3][4]

As of July 2015, forty-two LNRs in Hertfordshire have been notified to Natural England.[5] The largest site is Therfield Heath with 147.3 hectares (364 acres). It has some of the richest chalk grassland in England, and it is also a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).[6] The smallest is Oxleys Wood in Hatfield, which has an area of only 1.2 hectares (3.0 acres). This wood often floods, and it provides a habitat for a wide range of insects and birds.[7] Several other sites are also SSSIs, such as Croxley Common Moor[8] and Sherrardspark Wood.[9] The oldest LNR in Hertfordshire listed by Natural England is Hilfield Park Reservoir, declared in 1969,[10] and the newest Weston Hills in 2012.[11]

Key

Other classifications

Sites

Site Photograph Area[a] Location[b] Map[c] Details[d] Other classifications Description
Albans Wood Albans Wood 2.JPG 4.1 hectares (10 acres) Watford
51°41′39″N 0°23′54″W / 51.6941°N 0.3983°W / 51.6941; -0.3983 (Albans Wood)
TL 108 007
Map Details The site is ancient semi-natural woodland. It is mainly oak with other trees such as beech, horse chestnut and sweet chestnut. Mammals include muntjac deer and noctule bats.[13]
Batford Springs River Lea Waterfall at Batford Springs 3.5 hectares (8.6 acres) St Albans
51°49′22″N 0°20′19″W / 51.8228°N 0.3386°W / 51.8228; -0.3386 (Batford Springs)
TL 146 151
Map Details The main feature of the reserve is a number of small springs which are the source of chalk streams and ponds. The River Lea runs through the site, and there is grassland and a small wood.[14]
Cassiobury Park Daffodils in Cassiobury Park 25.1 hectares (62 acres) Watford
51°39′34″N 0°25′32″W / 51.6594°N 0.4256°W / 51.6594; -0.4256 (Cassiobury Park)
TQ 090 968
Map Details HMWT[15] This large park in Watford has a variety of habitats, including streams, ponds, watercress beds, wet grassland and wet woodland. The Grand Union Canal and River Gade run through the site.[16]
Cheshunt Park[e] Cheshunt Park 11.JPG 40.0 hectares (99 acres) Broxbourne
51°43′00″N 0°02′45″W / 51.7167°N 0.04575°W / 51.7167; -0.04575 (Cheshunt Park)
TL 351 038
Map Details The history of the park goes back to Roman times. It is grass and woodland which has ancient hedgerows, wildflower meadows, a pond and an orchard which is cropped by traditional cattle breeds.[17][18]
Chorleywood Common Chorleywood Common 75.6 hectares (187 acres) Three Rivers
51°39′15″N 0°30′40″W / 51.6542°N 0.5110°W / 51.6542; -0.5110 (Chorleywood Common)
TQ 031 961
Map Details CAONB[19] Some 300 fungi, 70 plant species and fifty birds have been recorded on the common, which has habitats including acid heathland, neutral grassland, chalk meadows and secondary woodland.[20]
Chorleywood House Estate Chorleywood House Estate 64.3 hectares (159 acres) Three Rivers
51°39′47″N 0°30′08″W / 51.6631°N 0.5021°W / 51.6631; -0.5021 (Chorleywood House Estate)
TQ 037 971
Map Details The River Chess runs through the estate, which has formal parkland surrounding a 200-year-old manor house, meadows and mature woodland.[21]
Colney Heath River Colne in Colney Heath 22.5 hectares (56 acres) St Albans
51°44′17″N 0°15′38″W / 51.7380°N 0.2606°W / 51.7380; -0.2606 (Colney Heath)
TL 202 058
Map Details The site is acid grassland, which is unusual in Hertfordshire, and the River Colne runs through it. The heath is managed to maintain the grassland and the diversity of plant species along the river.[22]
The CommonsThe Commons The Commons, Welwyn Garden City 2.JPG 13.2 hectares (33 acres) Welwyn Hatfield
51°47′01″N 0°10′34″W / 51.7835°N 0.1762°W / 51.7835; -0.1762 (The Commons, Welwyn Garden City)
TL 259 110
Map Details The site has a variety of habitats including oak woodland, flower-rich meadows, wet fens, ditches and ponds. The meadows are grazed by livestock.[23]
Croxley Common Moor River Gade in Croxley Common Moor 41.2 hectares (102 acres) Three Rivers
51°38′30″N 0°26′11″W / 51.6416°N 0.4363°W / 51.6416; -0.4363 (Croxley Common Moor)
TQ 083 948
Map Details SSSI[8] The site is mainly grass heathland with some ancient woodland and hazel coppice. Over 250 species of plants have been recorded.[8][24]
Danesbury Park Danesbury Park 6.JPG 24.5 hectares (61 acres) Welwyn Hatfield
51°50′14″N 0°13′03″W / 51.8372°N 0.2176°W / 51.8372; -0.2176 (Danesbury Park)
TL 229 169
Map Details The site was formerly the park of Danesbury House, and it still has some large mature trees which are important to wildlife. Grassland areas, which are grazed by rare-breed cattle, have many varieties of flowering plants.[25]
Fisher's Field Fisher's Field 2.JPG 1.8 hectares (4.4 acres) Hertsmere
51°39′28″N 0°22′56″W / 51.6579°N 0.3823°W / 51.6579; -0.3823 (Fisher's Field)
TQ 120 967
Map Details The area was allotments during the Second World War. There are areas of woodland, with trees including oak, rowan and wild cherry, and a wildflower meadow and scrub with bramble, raspberry and willow herb. Animals include green woodpeckers, shrews and bees.[26]
Furzefield Wood and Lower Halfpenny Pigeon in Furzefield Wood 7.4 hectares (18 acres) Hertsmere
51°42′21″N 0°12′14″W / 51.7057°N 0.2040°W / 51.7057; -0.2040 (Furzefield Wood and Lower Halfpenny)
TL 242 023
Map Details The wood has been managed for coppicing for over 300 years. It now provides a habitat for birds, and fallen branches are important for invertebrates. Lower Halfpenny is a meadow which was once the route of an old drovers' track.[27]
Garston Park Garston Park Local Nature Reserve 9.JPG 6.4 hectares (16 acres) Watford
51°41′28″N 0°22′47″W / 51.6912°N 0.3796°W / 51.6912; -0.3796 (Garston Park)
TL 121 004
Map Details The nature reserve has woodland which is mainly oak, ash and sycamore, and there are also areas of grassland and wetland. Mammals include muntjac deer and pipistrelle bats.[28]
Harebreaks Wood Harebreaks Wood 6.JPG 5.1 hectares (13 acres) Watford
51°40′51″N 0°24′32″W / 51.6808°N 0.4089°W / 51.6808; -0.4089 (Harebreaks Wood)
TQ 101 992
Map Details The site is semi-natural woodland of oak, ash and cherry, which goes back to at least 1600. Birds include treecreeper and nuthatch, and there mammals such as muntjac deer and pipistrelle bats.[29][30]
Hilfield Park Reservoir[f] Hilfield Park Reservoir 23.JPG 74.7 hectares (185 acres) Hertsmere
51°38′57″N 0°19′39″W / 51.6491°N 0.3276°W / 51.6491; -0.3276 (Hilfield Park Reservoir)
TQ 158 958
Map Details HMWT[31] This large reservoir is of national importance for pochards, tufted ducks and common tern. The margins have marshy areas with many breeding birds and marsh plants, such as reedmace and reed canarygrass.[32][33]
Howe Dell Howe Dell 9.JPG 4.0 hectares (9.9 acres) Welwyn Hatfield
51°45′26″N 0°13′20″W / 51.7572°N 0.2222°W / 51.7572; -0.2222 (Howe Dell)
TL 228 080
Map Details The site is woodland which runs along both sides of a stream with steep sides. The main trees are hornbeam, oak and beech.[34]
Howe Grove Wood Howe Grove Wood 9.JPG 8.5 hectares (21 acres) Dacorum
51°45′58″N 0°28′00″W / 51.7661°N 0.4668°W / 51.7661; -0.4668 (Howe Grove Wood)
TL 059 086
Map Details This site is dense woodland next to the A4147 road in Hemel Hempstead.[35]
Ivel Springs Spring at Radwell feeding the Ivel 15.4 hectares (38 acres) North Hertfordshire
51°59′39″N 0°11′38″W / 51.9942°N 0.1939°W / 51.9942; -0.1939 (Ivel Springs)
TL 241 344
Map Details The site, which was a rubbish dump until the 1950s, has habitats including woodland, wetland and pasture. Its springs are the source of the River Ivel, and they have a wide variety of wildlife.[36]
Lairage Land, TheThe Lairage Land The Lairage Land 1.JPG 4.4 hectares (11 acres) Watford
51°38′41″N 0°24′21″W / 51.6448°N 0.4059°W / 51.6448; -0.4059 (The Lairage Land)
TQ 104 952
Map Details The site is mainly rough grassland, with some woodland and scrub. The River Colne runs along its southern boundary, with stream water crowfoot and yellow water lily growing in the water. A notable insect is Roesel's bush-crickets.[37]
Mardley Heath Mardley Heath 41.1 hectares (102 acres) Welwyn Hatfield
51°50′58″N 0°11′33″W / 51.8494°N 0.1925°W / 51.8494; -0.1925 (Mardley Heath)
TL 246 183
Map Details In the middle of the twentieth century the heath was used for gravel extraction, and it is now regenerating naturally. Oak and hornbeam woodland around the perimeter remains, and it is managed to enhance biodiversity.[38]
Marshalls Heath Marshalls Heath 7.JPG 4.0 hectares (9.9 acres) St Albans
51°49′15″N 0°19′01″W / 51.8207°N 0.3169°W / 51.8207; -0.3169 (Marshalls Heath)
TL 161 149
Map Details The site is secondary woodland and scrub on acid heathland, but the many species recorded include forty on national lists of threatened species. It is one of the key Hertfordshire sites for butterflies and moths.[39]
Northaw Great Wood Country Park Pond, Northaw Great Wood - geograph.org.uk - 448401.jpg 120.7 hectares (298 acres) Welwyn Hatfield
51°43′22″N 0°08′28″W / 51.7227°N 0.14105304°W / 51.7227; -0.14105304 (Northaw Great Wood Country Park)
TL 285 043
Map Details SSSI[40] The park has one of the county's most extensive areas of ancient hornbeam woodland, with other trees including oak and silver birch. Glades, streams and springs add to the biodiversity.[40]
Norton Common Trees on a snowy Norton Common 25.7 hectares (64 acres) North Hertfordshire
51°59′05″N 0°13′40″W / 51.9848°N 0.2278°W / 51.9848; -0.2278 (Norton Common)
TL 218 333
Map Details Woodland on this site has diverse wildlife including black squirrels, muntjac deer, and birds such as chiff chaffs and blackcaps. There are also meadows with wild flowers, and the Pix Brook, which is fed by mineral-rich springs.[41][42]
Oughtonhead Common River Oughton at Oughtonhead Common 17.4 hectares (43 acres) North Hertfordshire
51°57′39″N 0°18′05″W / 51.9607°N 0.3015°W / 51.9607; -0.3015 (Oughtonhead Commo)
TL 168 305
Map Details The common is part of the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.[43] It has a wide variety of habitats, and the River Oughton flows along the edge. English Longhorn cattle graze pasture areas.[44]
Oxhey Woods Oxhey Woods 100.2 hectares (248 acres) Three Rivers
51°37′27″N 0°24′29″W / 51.6241°N 0.4080°W / 51.6241; -0.4080 (Oxhey Woods)
TQ 103 929
Map Details The site is mainly semi-natural woodland, and some areas date back to the end of the last Ice Age, the Younger Dryas, 11,500 years ago.[45] Plants include bluebells, anemones and violets and the rare wild service tree.[46]
Oxleys Wood Oxleys Wood 6.JPG 1.2 hectares (3.0 acres) Welwyn Hatfield
51°45′03″N 0°13′24″W / 51.7509°N 0.2232°W / 51.7509; -0.2232 (Oxleys Wood)
TL 227 073
Map Details The wood floods in wet weather, particularly the northern part, which has a pond. Tree species include oak, ash, elm and willow, and they provide a habitat for insects which provide food for birds.[47]
Prestwick Road Meadows Prestwick Road Meadows 6.JPG 2.8 hectares (6.9 acres) Three Rivers
51°37′03″N 0°23′17″W / 51.6176°N 0.3880°W / 51.6176; -0.3880 (Prestwick Road Meadows)
TQ 117 922
Map Details This site was formerly farm meadows. It has many insects and flowers include purple knapweed, yellow birdsfoot-trefoil and red clover. Old hedgerows still survive, and there is also a seasonal pond where frogs breed in the spring.[48]
Purwell Meadows River Purwell in Purwell Meadows 5.JPG 8.6 hectares (21 acres) North Hertfordshire
51°57′14″N 0°15′19″W / 51.9538°N 0.2552°W / 51.9538; -0.2552 (Purwell Meadows)
TL 200 298
Map Details The River Purwell runs through the meadows. Wildlife includes kingfishers, which are native to the area, and water voles.[49]
Rickmansworth Aquadrome Rickmansworth Aquadrome 41.0 hectares (101 acres) Three Rivers
51°37′59″N 0°28′43″W / 51.6331°N 0.4785°W / 51.6331; -0.4785 (Rickmansworth Aquadrome)
TQ 054 938
Map Details There are two lakes and a diverse range of wildlife habitats.[50] The site has trees such as oaks and willows, birds including herons and moorhens, and small copper and gatekeeper butterflies.[51]
Sherrardspark Wood Sherrardspark Wood 73.2 hectares (181 acres) Welwyn Hatfield
51°48′37″N 0°13′02″W / 51.8102°N 0.2172°W / 51.8102; -0.2172 (Sherrardspark Wood)
TL 230 139
Map Details SSSI[9] Much of this site is sessile oak woodland. Some trees are 250 years old, and diverse flora includes violet and broad-leaved helleborine, both of which are rare.[9]
Shrubhill Common Shrubhill Common 5.JPG 9.8 hectares (24 acres) Dacorum
51°45′14″N 0°30′07″W / 51.7539°N 0.5020°W / 51.7539; -0.5020 (Shrubhill Common)
TL 035 072
Map Details CAONB[52] The common is woodland and scrub, together with two fields which are chalk grassland. There are over 100 species of wild flowers, and herbs such as marjoram and basil.[53]
Singlers Marsh River Mimram in Singlers Marsh 4.JPG 6.3 hectares (16 acres) Welwyn Hatfield
51°50′07″N 0°13′14″W / 51.8354°N 0.2206°W / 51.8354; -0.2206 (Singlers Marsh)
TL 227 167
Map Details The River Mimram runs along the edge of this site. It has grassland, which is managed by cattle grazing and cutting, and areas of willow scrub with some more mature trees.[54]
Stanborough Reedmarsh Stanborough Reedmarsh and River Lea 3.JPG 3.3 hectares (8.2 acres) Welwyn Hatfield
51°48′37″N 0°13′02″W / 51.8102°N 0.2172°W / 51.8102; -0.2172 (Stanborough Reedmarsh)
TL 230 139
Map Details HMWT[55] The site is wet willow woodland on the bank of the River Lea. It is important for water voles and birds such as reed and sedge warblers.[56] Water figwort, common meadow rue and water chickweed grow along the river bank.[55]
Stocker's Lake Stockers Lake 37.9 hectares (94 acres) Three Rivers
51°37′47″N 0°29′19″W / 51.6297°N 0.4887°W / 51.6297; -0.4887 (Stockers Lake)
TQ 047 934
Map Details HMWT[57] This is an old flooded gravel pit which has over sixty species of breeding birds, including shoveler and goldeneye ducks in nationally important numbers.[58]
Therfield Heath Pulsatilla Vulgaris On Therfield Heath 147.3 hectares (364 acres) North Hertfordshire
52°02′32″N 0°03′18″W / 52.0423°N 0.05491°W / 52.0423; -0.05491 (Therfield Heath)
TL 335 400
Map Details SSSI[6] This is unimproved pasture and has some of the richest chalk grassland in England. Plants include the rare pasque flower, and there are insects such as the chalkhill blue butterfly.[6]
Top Field and Cozens Grove Top Field 2.JPG 6.1 hectares (15 acres) Broxbourne
51°44′30″N 0°01′54″W / 51.7416°N 0.03164°W / 51.7416; -0.03164 (Top Field and Cozens Grove)
TL 360 066
Map Details Top Field is a wildflower meadow which is mown to provide a habitat for small mammals, birds and insects. Cozens Grove is an ancient wood which has coppiced hornbeam and a medieval sunken ditch.[59][60]
Watercress Wildlife Site Watercress Wildlife Site 4.JPG 1.2 hectares (3.0 acres) St Albans
51°44′37″N 0°19′58″W / 51.7436°N 0.3328°W / 51.7436; -0.3328 (Watercress Wildlife Site)
TL 152 063
Map Details The site was formerly one of the many commercial watercress beds in the area.[61] It has a wide variety of wildlife, including water rails, kingfishers, little grebes and muntjac deer.[62]
Waterford Heath Waterford Heath 35.2 hectares (87 acres) East Hertfordshire
51°49′05″N 0°05′32″W / 51.8181°N 0.09215°W / 51.8181; -0.09215 (Waterford Heath)
TL 316 150
Map Details HMWT[63] The site is mainly grassland, with areas of scrub, wood plantation and semi-natural woodland. Breeding birds include skylarks and willow warblers, and there are reptiles such as slow worms and grass snakes.[64]
Weston Hills Weston Hills 3.JPG 17.0 hectares (42 acres) North Hertfordshire
51°48′15″N 0°10′55″W / 51.8042°N 0.18189°W / 51.8042; -0.18189 (Weston Hills)
TL 250 326
Map Details Chalk grassland is its most important ecological feature and one of the best examples in Hertfordshire; plants are very diverse because the harsh conditions do not allow vigorous species to become dominant.[65]
Wheathampstead Wheathampstead LNR 4.JPG 5.9 hectares (15 acres) St Albans
51°48′15″N 0°10′55″W / 51.8042°N 0.18188°W / 51.8042; -0.18188 (Wheathampstead)
TL 177 131
Map Details This L shaped site has ash woodland, thorn scrub, mature hedgerows, and rough grassland. There are plants such as grass vetchling and bee orchid, birds including yellowhammer and whitethroat, and many butterflies.[66]
The WickThe Wick The Wick LNR 4.JPG 3.4 hectares (8.4 acres) St Albans
51°45′43″N 0°18′39″W / 51.7619°N 0.3108°W / 51.7619; -0.3108 (The Wick, St Albans)
TL 166 083
Map Details This is ancient woodland which is semi-natural, and the main trees are oak and hornbeam. Other features are a seasonal pond and historic field boundaries of bank and ditch.[67]
Withey Beds, TheThe Withey Beds The Withey Beds 7.JPG 7.5 hectares (19 acres) Three Rivers
51°38′04″N 0°26′38″W / 51.6345°N 0.4438°W / 51.6345; -0.4438 (The Withey Beds)
TQ 078 940
Map Details The site borders the River Colne, and it has a variety of habitats including dry grassland, wet woodland, marsh and ditches. A World War II pillbox has been turned into a bat roost.[68]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The area is taken from the Natural England map of each site. (Click on the identify icon (i) in the "Feature Tools" and then click on the site.)[12]
  2. ^ The location is taken from the Natural England details page for the site.
  3. ^ The maps are on the Natural England database of Local Nature Reserves.
  4. ^ Details are on the pages on each site in the Natural England database of Local Nature Reserves.[12]
  5. ^ This site is wrongly named Chestnut Park on the details page and correctly Cheshunt Park on the map
  6. ^ Access to Hilfield Park Reservoir is restricted to members of the Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust.[10] It is the only LNR in Hertfordshire which is not open to the public.

Coordinates: 51°54′N 0°12′W / 51.9°N 0.2°W / 51.9; -0.2

References

  1. ^ "Resident Population". Hertfordshire Local Information System. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  2. ^ "Area Measurements". Hertfordshire Local Information System. Retrieved 10 February 2015. 
  3. ^ "Protected or designated areas". Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and Natural England. 9 April 2013. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  4. ^ "Local nature reserves: setting up and management". Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and Natural England. 2 October 2014. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  5. ^ "Local Nature Reserves: Search Results for Hertfordshire". Nature England. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c "Therfield Heath citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 9 February 2015. 
  7. ^ "Oxleys Wood". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 10 February 2015. 
  8. ^ a b c "Croxley Common Moor citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 10 December 2014. 
  9. ^ a b c "Sherrardspark Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 8 February 2015. 
  10. ^ a b "Hilfield Park Reservoir". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 10 February 2015. 
  11. ^ "Weston Hills". North Hertfordshire District Council. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  12. ^ a b "Local Nature Reserves: Search Results for Hertfordshire". Natural England. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 
  13. ^ "Albans Wood". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 13 March 2013. Retrieved 1 April 2015. 
  14. ^ "Batford Springs". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 13 March 2013. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  15. ^ "Cassiobury Park LNR". Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 12 July 2016. 
  16. ^ "Cassiobury Park". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 6 October 2014. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  17. ^ "Cheshunt Park". Hertfordshire Countryside Management Service. Retrieved 18 February 2015. 
  18. ^ "Cheshunt Park leaflet" (PDF). Borough of Broxbourne. Retrieved 18 February 2015. 
  19. ^ "Chorleywood Common". Chilterns Conservation Board. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  20. ^ "Chorleywood Common". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 13 March 2013. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  21. ^ "Chorleywood House Estate". Three Rivers District Council. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  22. ^ "Colney Heath". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 13 March 2013. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  23. ^ "The Commons". Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council. Retrieved 22 March 2015. 
  24. ^ "Croxley Common Moor". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 13 March 2013. Retrieved 10 December 2014. 
  25. ^ "Danesbury". Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council. Retrieved 22 March 2015. 
  26. ^ "Fisher's Field nature reserve" (PDF). Hertsmere Borough Council. Retrieved 2 April 2015. 
  27. ^ "Furzefield Wood" (PDF). Hertfordshire County Council. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  28. ^ "Garston Park". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 6 October 2014. Retrieved 1 April 2015. 
  29. ^ "Harebreaks Wood". Watford Borough Council. Retrieved 2 April 2015. 
  30. ^ "Home page". Friends of Harebreaks Wood. Retrieved 2 April 2015. 
  31. ^ "Hilfield Park Reservoir". Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  32. ^ "Hilfield Park Reservoir". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  33. ^ "Hilfield Park Reservoir Wildlife Report 2013" (PDF). Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust and Affinity Water. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  34. ^ "Howe Dell". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 17 March 2013. Retrieved 16 February 2015. 
  35. ^ "Howe Grove Wood". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 26 February 2015. 
  36. ^ "Ivel Springs". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  37. ^ "The Lairage Land". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  38. ^ "Mardley Heath". Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  39. ^ "Marshalls Heath". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 16 July 2015. 
  40. ^ a b "Northaw Great Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 23 December 2014. 
  41. ^ "Norton Common". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  42. ^ "Welcome to Norton Common" (PDF). North Hertfordshire District Council. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  43. ^ "Oughtonhead Common". Chilterns Conservation Board. Retrieved 8 February 2015. 
  44. ^ "Oughtonhead Common". North Hertfordshire District Council. Retrieved 8 February 2015. 
  45. ^ "Local Nature Reserves". Three Rivers District Council. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  46. ^ "Oxhey Woods". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  47. ^ "Oxleys Wood". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 16 February 2015. 
  48. ^ "Prestwick Road Meadows" (PDF). Three Rivers District Council. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  49. ^ "Purwell Meadows". North Hertfordshire District Council. Retrieved 7 March 2015. 
  50. ^ "Rickmansworth Aquadrome". Three Rivers District Council. Retrieved 8 February 2015. 
  51. ^ "Rickmansworth Aquadrome leaflet" (PDF). Three Rivers District Council. Retrieved 8 February 2015. 
  52. ^ "Shrub Hill Common". Chilterns Conservation Board. Retrieved 26 February 2015. 
  53. ^ "Shrubhill Common Nature Reserve". Dacorum Environmental Forum - Members Pages. 3 February 2015. 
  54. ^ "Singlers Marsh". Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council. Retrieved 22 March 2015. 
  55. ^ a b "Stanborough Reedmarsh". Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 16 February 2015. 
  56. ^ "Stanborough Reedmarsh". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 16 February 2015. 
  57. ^ "Stocker's Lake". Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust. 
  58. ^ "Stockers Lake". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 8 February 2015. 
  59. ^ "Top Field and Cozens Grove". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 15 March 2013. Retrieved 16 February 2015. 
  60. ^ "Top Field Cozens Grove". Broxbourne Borough Council. Retrieved 16 February 2015. 
  61. ^ "History". Watercress Wildlife Association. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  62. ^ "Watercress Wildlife Site". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 16 March 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  63. ^ "Waterford Heath". Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 4 February 2015. 
  64. ^ "Waterford Heath". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 16 March 2013. Retrieved 4 February 2015. 
  65. ^ "Newsletter" (PDF). Hertfordshire Wildlife Trusts Partnership. March 2013. Retrieved 29 April 2015. 
  66. ^ "Wheathampstead". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 16 March 2013. Retrieved 17 July 2015. 
  67. ^ "The Wick". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 23 July 2015. 
  68. ^ "The Withey Beds". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 14 March 2013. Retrieved 25 April 2015. 
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