List of James Bond films

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This article is about the Bond films themselves. For the production background of the films, see James Bond in film. For the various portrayals of the character, see James Bond filmography.

James Bond is a fictional character created by novelist Ian Fleming in 1953, whose works were adapted into many spy films. Bond is a British secret agent working for MI6 who also answers by his codename, 007. He has been portrayed in twenty-six films by actors Sean Connery, David Niven, George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan and Daniel Craig. Only two films were not made by Eon Productions. Eon now holds the full adaptation rights to all of Fleming's Bond novels.[1][2]

In 1961 producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman joined forces to purchase the filming rights to Fleming's novels.[3] They founded the production company Eon Productions and, with financial backing by United Artists, began working on Dr. No, which was directed by Terence Young and featured Connery as Bond.[4] Following Dr. No's release in 1962, Broccoli and Saltzman created the holding company Danjaq to ensure future productions in the James Bond film series.[5] The series currently encompasses twenty-four films, with the most recent, Spectre, released in October 2015. With a combined gross of nearly $7 billion to date, the films produced by Eon constitute the Fourth -highest-grossing film series, behind Star Wars, Harry Potter and the Marvel Cinematic Universe films.[6] Accounting for the effects of inflation the Bond films have amassed over $14 billion at current prices.[a] The films have won five Academy Awards: for Sound Effects (now Sound Editing) in Goldfinger (at the 37th Awards), to John Stears for Visual Effects in Thunderball (at the 38th Awards), to Per Hallberg and Karen Baker Landers for Sound Editing, and to Adele and Paul Epworth for Original Song in Skyfall (at the 85th Awards), and to Sam Smith and Jimmy Napes for Original Song in Spectre (at the 88th Awards). Additionally, several of the songs produced for the films have been nominated for Academy Awards for Original Song, including Paul McCartney's "Live and Let Die", Carly Simon's "Nobody Does It Better" and Sheena Easton's "For Your Eyes Only". In 1982, Albert R. Broccoli received the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award.[8]

When Broccoli and Saltzman bought the rights to existing and future Fleming titles, it did not include Casino Royale, which had already been sold to producer Gregory Ratoff, with the story having been adapted for television in 1954. After Ratoff's death, the rights were passed on to Charles K. Feldman,[9] who subsequently produced the satirical Bond spoof Casino Royale in 1967.[10] A legal case ensured that the film rights to the novel Thunderball were held by Kevin McClory as he, Fleming and scriptwriter Jack Whittingham had written a film script upon which the novel was based.[1] Although Eon Productions and McClory joined forces to produce Thunderball, McClory still retained the rights to the story and adapted Thunderball into 1983's Never Say Never Again.[11] The current distribution rights to both of those films are held by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, the studio which distributes Eon's regular series.[12][13]

Eon Productions films

1960s

Sean Connery was the original James Bond.

In 1961, producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman joined forces to adapt Ian Fleming's James Bond novels.[3] They founded the production company Eon Productions and signed a deal with United Artists for 100 per cent financial backing and distribution of seven films,[14] with financing of $1 million for the first feature, Dr. No.[15] Released in 1962, it starred Sean Connery, who after being cast as Bond, signed to do six films. Saltzman and Broccoli followed Dr. No with From Russia with Love in 1963 and Goldfinger the following year. Afterwards, Eon Productions joined forces with Kevin McClory to produce Thunderball (1965), as McClory gained the legal rights to that novel following a lawsuit.[11] Connery was renegotiating his contract by then, and got released from it during the production of his fifth film, 1967's You Only Live Twice.[16] George Lazenby became the second actor to play agent 007 in an Eon Productions film in On Her Majesty's Secret Service, which was released in 1969 and turned out to be Lazenby's only appearance in the series, as his agent convinced him to not follow through with a seven picture deal.[17]

Film Year Director Screenwriter(s) James Bond actor Plot
Dr. No 1962 Terence Young Richard Maibaum, Johanna Harwood, Berkely Mather Sean Connery James Bond traces a mysterious murder to a Chinese scientist living on a small Jamaican island who, working for SPECTRE, plans to disrupt American rocket launches.
From Russia with Love 1963 Richard Maibaum SPECTRE hires a seductive young female Soviet agent to act as a fake defector in a plot to assassinate Bond; in turn 007 uses her to get a Soviet decoding machine.
Goldfinger 1964 Guy Hamilton Richard Maibaum, Paul Dehn Bond battles gold magnate Auric Goldfinger, who plans to irradiate the gold supply of Fort Knox, making it worthless and increasing the value of his own supply.
Thunderball 1965 Terence Young Richard Maibaum & John Hopkins (screenplay)
Kevin McClory, Jack Whittingham & Ian Fleming (story)
Bond is sent to the Bahamas to stop Emilio Largo, playboy billionaire and deputy head of SPECTRE, from attacking a major U.S. city with nuclear weapons.
You Only Live Twice 1967 Lewis Gilbert Roald Dahl After faking his own death, Bond goes to Japan to investigate the hijacking of American and Soviet manned spacecraft from orbit, which turns out to be a plan by Ernst Stavro Blofeld, the megalomaniacal head of SPECTRE, to start World War III.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service 1969 Peter R. Hunt Richard Maibaum George Lazenby In pursuit of Blofeld, Bond discovers SPECTRE's plan for biochemical terror. Meanwhile, Bond falls in love with and marries a crime lord's suicidal daughter, who is murdered on their wedding day.

1970s

Roger Moore is tied with Sean Connery for playing "James Bond" the most times, in seven films.

Saltzman and Broccoli tested other actors for James Bond, but studio United Artists wanted Sean Connery back, paying a then-record $1.25 million salary for him to return in Diamonds Are Forever, released in 1971.[18] Connery refused to play the role further, and his eventual replacement was Roger Moore, who made his debut as 007 in 1973 with Live and Let Die.[19] Follow-up The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) was the last film co-produced by Harry Saltzman, who sold his 50% stake in Eon Productions' parent company, Danjaq, to United Artists to alleviate his financial problems, and the resulting legalities over the Bond property delayed production of the next Bond film, The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).[20] Having filled his original deal, Moore started to negotiate contracts on a film-by-film basis, signing to do a fourth Bond film, 1979's Moonraker.[21]


Film Year Director Screenwriter(s) James Bond actor Plot
Diamonds Are Forever 1971 Guy Hamilton Richard Maibaum, Tom Mankiewicz Sean Connery Bond traces a diamond smuggling operation first to Holland and Las Vegas and then to a SPECTRE plot to build a satellite with laser beams capable of destroying weapons on the ground.
Live and Let Die 1973 Tom Mankiewicz Roger Moore Bond fights voodoo priests, heroin smugglers and a ruthless dictator in New York, New Orleans and San Monique in a film imitating the conventions of "blaxploitation" movies of the era.
The Man with the Golden Gun 1974 Richard Maibaum, Tom Mankiewicz While trying to locate a missing solar expert, Bond ends up in an intense game of cat-and-mouse with the world's top assassin, Francisco Scaramanga.
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 Lewis Gilbert Christopher Wood, Richard Maibaum Bond teams up with a female Russian agent to locate two missing nuclear submarines; he winds up dealing with a man whose dream is an undersea empire.
Moonraker 1979 Christopher Wood Bond investigates the mid-air hijacking of one of the Moonraker space shuttles. The shuttle's maker, Hugo Drax, is using his shuttle fleet as part of a scheme to wipe out humanity using a toxic nerve gas and re-populating the Earth with a super race.

1980s

Timothy Dalton replaced Roger Moore as James Bond.

For Your Eyes Only retained Roger Moore, but marked a change in the production crew: John Glen was promoted from his duties as a film editor to director, a position he would occupy for the next four films.[22] Follow-up Octopussy was the first distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, who purchased United Artists in 1981,[23] and A View to a Kill marked Moore's departure from the series. Timothy Dalton took over the role, starring in The Living Daylights and Licence to Kill.[24]


Film Year Director Screenwriter(s) James Bond actor Plot
For Your Eyes Only 1981 John Glen Richard Maibaum, Michael G. Wilson Roger Moore Bond's investigation of the murder of a marine archaeologist working for the British Secret Service leads him to a race against the Soviets for a submarine attack computer in a sunken ship.
Octopussy 1983 George MacDonald Fraser, Richard Maibaum, Michael G. Wilson The murder of Agent 009 and a forgery of a Fabergé egg lead Bond to India, where he allies with cult leader Octopussy against Kamal Khan, a playboy Afghan prince, who with Russian General Orlov is plotting to "accidentally" detonate a nuclear device on a US air base in West Germany, hoping NATO will disarm and the Soviets can take over Europe in record time.
A View to a Kill 1985 Richard Maibaum, Michael G. Wilson Bond investigates a high-tech firm headed up by former KGB Agent and industrialist Max Zorin, and uncovers a plot to corner the market on microchips by manufacturing an earthquake that would drown Silicon Valley (and all of Zorin's competition).
The Living Daylights 1987 Timothy Dalton Bond teams up with a female cellist to investigate the fake defector for whom she was allegedly working, General Georgi Koskov, leading them to a weapons-for-drugs smuggling scheme headed up by powerful arms dealer Brad Whitaker.
Licence to Kill 1989 Bond resigns from the secret service to avenge the attempted murder of his CIA friend, Felix Leiter. His pursuit of the assailants leads him to powerful Colombian drug lord Franz Sanchez and a mysterious woman, Pam Bouvier, who has an agenda of her own in bringing down Sanchez and his empire.

1990s

Smiling man with short, tousled hair, wearing white shirt open at collar, and black jacket.
James Bond's return had him portrayed by Pierce Brosnan.

Pre-production work for the third James Bond film starring Timothy Dalton, fulfilling his three-film contract, began in May 1990.[25] The project eventually entered development hell caused by legal problems between Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, parent company of the series' distributor United Artists, and Danjaq, owners of the Bond film rights.[26] Dalton's contract had expired when the lawsuits were settled in 1992.[27] Pierce Brosnan was brought in to become the new Bond, and his 1995 debut, GoldenEye, also marked the first film in the series not produced by Albert R. Broccoli: his deteriorating health (Broccoli died seven months after the release of GoldenEye) led daughter Barbara Broccoli and stepson Michael G. Wilson to take over the series.[28][29] Brosnan had two more films that decade, Tomorrow Never Dies in 1997 and The World Is Not Enough in 1999.[30]

Film Year Director Screenwriter(s) James Bond actor Plot
GoldenEye 1995 Martin Campbell Bruce Feirstein, Jeffrey Caine, Michael France Pierce Brosnan Bond fights to prevent a syndicate of techno-terrorists from causing a global financial meltdown through usage of the GoldenEye satellite weapon against London.
Tomorrow Never Dies 1997 Roger Spottiswoode Bruce Feirstein Bond investigates media mogul Elliot Carver, who aims to start a war between the UK and China so he can be guaranteed exclusive coverage for his new cable news channel.
The World Is Not Enough 1999 Michael Apted Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, Bruce Feirstein Bond is asked to play bodyguard to oil heiress Elektra King whose father was murdered in MI6 headquarters, and discovers she still has a connection and a plan to the terrorist who once kidnapped her, Renard.

2000s

Daniel Craig has been the most recent actor to play James Bond.

Pierce Brosnan had signed a deal for four films when he was cast in the role of James Bond. This was fulfilled with the production of Die Another Day in 2002.[31] Afterwards Eon decided to reboot the series with a younger actor. Daniel Craig was eventually cast as Bond in Casino Royale (an adaptation of the first James Bond novel), released in 2006. It was followed by Quantum of Solace in 2008.[32]

Film Year Director Screenwriter(s) James Bond actor Plot
Die Another Day 2002 Lee Tamahori Neal Purvis and Robert Wade Pierce Brosnan After Bond is released from one year in North Korean captivity for killing General Moon, he tries to discover who betrayed him, teaming up with a female American agent. Eventually he finds out Moon's henchmen have ties to a mysterious diamond dealer, Gustav Graves.
Casino Royale 2006 Martin Campbell Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, Paul Haggis Daniel Craig Bond attempts to frustrate the schemes of terrorist financier Le Chiffre by defeating him at a high-stakes game of Texas hold 'em poker at Casino Royale in Montenegro. In the meantime he falls in love with treasury employee Vesper Lynd, who turns out to have an agenda of her own.
Quantum of Solace 2008 Marc Forster Bond pursues Quantum, the organisation he believes responsible for the death of Vesper Lynd. Along with Camille Montes, a young woman seeking revenge, he goes after corrupt General Medrano, who plans with Quantum to stage a military coup in Bolivia and hijack "one of the world's most precious natural resources".

2010s

Sam Mendes was attached to work on the twenty-third James Bond film in 2008, but production was halted until 2011 as MGM faced financial troubles. Skyfall was released on the fiftieth anniversary of the series in 2012,[33] and became the highest-grossing film in the franchise.[34] Mendes was brought back to do follow-up Spectre, released in 2015.[35][36][37]

Film Year Director Screenwriter(s) James Bond actor Plot
Skyfall 2012 Sam Mendes Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, John Logan Daniel Craig Events in M's past bring into question 007's loyalty to her; with MI6 coming under attack, Bond must find and destroy the source of the trouble, whatever the cost.
Spectre 2015 Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, John Logan, Jez Butterworth As Gareth Mallory, the newly appointed M, continues fighting political pressures that threaten the future of MI6, Bond follows a trail that leads to the sinister organisation known as SPECTRE and an enemy from his past.

Non-Eon films

David Niven starred in the 1967 spoof Casino Royale.

Two James Bond films were produced without the involvement of Eon Productions, done by producers who held adaptation rights to individual Ian Fleming novels. Charles K. Feldman, who had acquired the film rights to Casino Royale in 1960, failed to come to terms with Eon for a joint production. Believing that he could not compete with the Eon series, Feldman resolved to produce the film as a satire. Released in 1967 by Columbia Pictures, Casino Royale starred David Niven as a James Bond who comes out of retirement to investigate the deaths of international spies. With the aid of Bond impersonators he battles the mysterious Dr. Noah and SMERSH.[9] Years later, Kevin McClory used his rights to Thunderball and joined forces with producer Jack Schwartzman and studio Warner Bros. to adapt the novel into 1983's Never Say Never Again. Sean Connery played the role of James Bond for the seventh time, marking his return to the character 12 years after Diamonds Are Forever.[11] The current distribution rights to both of those films are held by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.[12][13]

Title Year Director Producer Writer Bond actor
Casino Royale 1967 Ken Hughes
John Huston
Joseph McGrath
Robert Parrish
Val Guest
Richard Talmadge
Charles K. Feldman, Jerry Bresler Wolf Mankowitz, John Law, Michael Sayers David Niven
Never Say Never Again 1983 Irvin Kershner Jack Schwartzman
Kevin McClory (executive producer)
Lorenzo Semple Jr. Sean Connery

Box office and budget

The Eon-produced films have a combined gross of nearly $7 billion, and constitute the fourth-highest-grossing film series, behind Star Wars, Harry Potter films and the Marvel Cinematic Universe.[6]

Title Year Bond actor Director Box office Budget Salary of Bond actor Box office Budget Salary of Bond actor
Actual $ (millions)[38][39][40] Adjusted 2005 $ (millions)[39]
Dr. No 1962 Connery, SeanSean Connery Young, TerenceTerence Young 59.5 1.1 0.1[b] 448.8 7.0 0.6
From Russia with Love 1963 Connery, SeanSean Connery Young, TerenceTerence Young 78.9 2.0 0.3 543.8 12.6 1.6
Goldfinger 1964 Connery, SeanSean Connery Hamilton, GuyGuy Hamilton 124.9 3.0 0.5 820.4 18.6 3.2
Thunderball 1965 Connery, SeanSean Connery Young, TerenceTerence Young 141.2 6.8 0.8 848.1 41.9 4.7
Casino Royale[N] 1967 Niven, DavidDavid Niven 44.4[34] 12[34] n/a 260[41] 70[41] n/a
You Only Live Twice 1967 Connery, SeanSean Connery Gilbert, LewisLewis Gilbert 101.0 10.3 0.8 + 25% net merch royalty 514.2 59.9 4.4 excluding profit participation
On Her Majesty's Secret Service 1969 Lazenby, GeorgeGeorge Lazenby Hunt, Peter R.Peter R. Hunt 64.6 7.0 0.1 291.5 37.3 0.6
Diamonds Are Forever 1971 Connery, SeanSean Connery Hamilton, GuyGuy Hamilton 116.0 7.2 1.2 + 12.5% of gross (14.5) [c] 442.5 34.7 5.8 excluding profit participation
Live and Let Die 1973 Moore, RogerRoger Moore Hamilton, GuyGuy Hamilton 126.4 7.0 0.18 460.3 30.8 0.7
The Man with the Golden Gun 1974 Moore, RogerRoger Moore Hamilton, GuyGuy Hamilton 98.5 7.0 0.24 + 2.5% 334.0 27.7 0..8 excluding profit participation
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 Moore, RogerRoger Moore Gilbert, LewisLewis Gilbert 185.4 14.0 0.3 + 3.75% 533.0 45.1 0..9 excluding profit participation
Moonraker 1979 Moore, RogerRoger Moore Gilbert, LewisLewis Gilbert 210.3 34.0 n/a 535.0 91.5 n/a
For Your Eyes Only 1981 Moore, RogerRoger Moore Glen, JohnJohn Glen 194.9 28.0 n/a 449.4 60.2 n/a
Octopussy 1983 Moore, RogerRoger Moore Glen, JohnJohn Glen 183.7 27.5 4.0 373.8 53.9 7.8
Never Say Never Again[N] 1983 Connery, SeanSean Connery Kershner, IrvinIrvin Kershner 160[34] 36[34] n/a 314[41] 71[41] n/a
A View to a Kill 1985 Moore, RogerRoger Moore Glen, JohnJohn Glen 152.4 30.0 5.0 275.2 54.5 9.1
The Living Daylights 1987 Dalton, TimothyTimothy Dalton Glen, JohnJohn Glen 191.2 40.0 3.0 313.5 68.8 5.2
Licence to Kill 1989 Dalton, TimothyTimothy Dalton Glen, JohnJohn Glen 156.2 36.0 5.0 250.9 56.7 7.9
GoldenEye 1995 Brosnan, PiercePierce Brosnan Campbell, MartinMartin Campbell 351.9 60.0 4.0 518.5 76.9 5.1
Tomorrow Never Dies 1997 Brosnan, PiercePierce Brosnan Spottiswoode, RogerRoger Spottiswoode 338.9 110.0 8.2 463.2 133.9 10.0
The World Is Not Enough 1999 Brosnan, PiercePierce Brosnan Apted, MichaelMichael Apted 361.8 135.0 12.4 439.5 158.3 13.5
Die Another Day 2002 Brosnan, PiercePierce Brosnan Tamahori, LeeLee Tamahori 431.9 142.0 16.5 465.4 154.2 17.9
Casino Royale 2006 Craig, DanielDaniel Craig Campbell, MartinMartin Campbell 594.2 150.0 3.4 581.5 145.3 3.3
Quantum of Solace 2008 Craig, DanielDaniel Craig Forster, MarcMarc Forster 576.0 200.0 8.9 514.2 181.4 8.1
Skyfall 2012 Craig, DanielDaniel Craig Mendes, SamSam Mendes 1108.6[42] 150.0[43][44]–200.0[42] 17.0[45] 943.5[41] 127.7–170.2[41] 14.5[41]
Spectre 2015 Craig, DanielDaniel Craig Mendes, SamSam Mendes 880.7[46] 245.0–250.0[d] 39[54] 725.5[41] 201.8–205.9[41] n/a
Total Eon-produced film series 6,829.1 1,4531,508 12,086 1,881–1,927
All films 7,033.5 1,5011,556 13,283 2,162–2,208
Note
  • 1 2 Films not produced by Eon

Reception and accolades

The Bond films have been nominated for a number of awards throughout their fifty-year history, with most films winning an award; these include successes at the British Academy Film Awards, Golden Globe Awards and Academy Awards. In addition, in 1982 Albert R. Broccoli received the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award.[55]

Film Year Actor Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic CinemaScore Awards
Dr. No 1962 Connery, SeanSean Connery 96% (51 reviews)[56] Winner, Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year – Actress at the 21st Golden Globe Awards[57]
From Russia with Love 1963 Connery, SeanSean Connery 96% (52 reviews)[58] Winner, BAFTA Award for British Cinematography: Colour at the 17th British Academy Film Awards[59]
Nominated, Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song at the 22nd Golden Globe Awards[60]
Goldfinger 1964 Connery, SeanSean Connery 96% (57 reviews)[61] Winner, Academy Award for Best Sound Effects at the 37th Academy Awards[62]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best British Art Direction: Colour at the 18th British Academy Film Awards[63]
Thunderball 1965 Connery, SeanSean Connery 86% (43 reviews)[64] Winner, Academy Award for Best Visual Effects at the 38th Academy Awards[65]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best British Art Direction: Colour at the 19th British Academy Film Awards[66]
Casino Royale 1967 Niven, DavidDavid Niven 29% (34 reviews)[67]
You Only Live Twice 1967 Connery, SeanSean Connery 72% (43 reviews)[68] Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best British Art Direction: Colour at the 21st British Academy Film Awards[69]
On Her Majesty's Secret Service 1969 Lazenby, GeorgeGeorge Lazenby 82% (45 reviews)[70] Nominated, Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year – Actor at the 27th Golden Globe Awards[71]
Diamonds Are Forever 1971 Connery, SeanSean Connery 67% (43 reviews)[72] Nominated, Academy Award for Best Sound Mixing at the 44th Academy Awards[73]
Live and Let Die 1973 Moore, RogerRoger Moore 66% (44 reviews)[74] Nominated, Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 46th Academy Awards[75]
The Man with the Golden Gun 1974 Moore, RogerRoger Moore 45% (44 reviews)[76]
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 Moore, RogerRoger Moore 79% (47 reviews)[77] Nominated, Academy Awards for Best Original Score, Best Original Song and Best Production Design at the 50th Academy Awards[78]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Production Design at the 31st British Academy Film Awards[79]
Nominated, Anthony Asquith Award at the 31st British Academy Film Awards[79]
Nominated, Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song at the 35th Golden Globe Awards[80]
Nominated, Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score at the 35th Golden Globe Awards[80]
Moonraker 1979 Moore, RogerRoger Moore 60% (45 reviews)[81] Nominated, Academy Award for Best Visual Effects at the 52nd Academy Awards[82]
For Your Eyes Only 1981 Moore, RogerRoger Moore 74% (46 reviews)[83] Nominated, Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 54th Academy Awards[8]
Nominated, Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song at the 39th Golden Globe Awards[84]
Octopussy 1983 Moore, RogerRoger Moore 42% (43 reviews)[85]
Never Say Never Again 1983 Connery, SeanSean Connery 63% (46 reviews)[86]
A View to a Kill 1985 Moore, RogerRoger Moore 36% (55 reviews)[87] Nominated, Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song at the 43rd Golden Globe Awards[88]
The Living Daylights 1987 Dalton, TimothyTimothy Dalton 70% (50 reviews)[89]
Licence to Kill 1989 Dalton, TimothyTimothy Dalton 77% (52 reviews)[90] B+[91]
GoldenEye 1995 Brosnan, PiercePierce Brosnan 78% (72 reviews)[92] 65 (18 reviews)[93] A-[91] Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Sound at the 49th British Academy Film Awards[94]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Special Visual Effects at the 49th British Academy Film Awards[95]
Tomorrow Never Dies 1997 Brosnan, PiercePierce Brosnan 57% (82 reviews)[96] 52 (38 reviews)[97] A-[91] Nominated, Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song at the 55th Golden Globe Awards[98]
The World Is Not Enough 1999 Brosnan, PiercePierce Brosnan 51% (136 reviews)[99] 57 (38 reviews)[100]
Die Another Day 2002 Brosnan, PiercePierce Brosnan 58% (215 reviews)[101] 56 (43 reviews)[102] A-[91] Nominated, Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score at the 60th Golden Globe Awards[103]
Casino Royale 2006 Craig, DanielDaniel Craig 95% (246 reviews)[104] 80 (46 reviews)[105] A-[91] Nominated, Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film at the 60th British Academy Film Awards[106]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role at the 60th British Academy Film Awards[107]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Special Visual Effects at the 60th British Academy Film Awards[107]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Adapted Screenplay at the 60th British Academy Film Awards[107]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Production Design at the 60th British Academy Film Awards[107]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Sound at the 60th British Academy Film Awards[107]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Editing at the 60th British Academy Film Awards[108]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Cinematography at the 60th British Academy Film Awards[108]
Nominated, Anthony Asquith Award for achievement in Film Music at the 60th British Academy Film Awards[108]
Quantum of Solace 2008 Craig, DanielDaniel Craig 65% (280 reviews)[109] 58 (48 reviews)[110] B-[91] Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Sound at the 62nd British Academy Film Awards[111]
Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best Special Visual Effects at the 62nd British Academy Film Awards[111]
Skyfall 2012 Craig, DanielDaniel Craig 93% (347 reviews)[112] 81 (49 reviews)[113] A[91] Winner, Academy Award for Best Sound Editing at the 85th Academy Awards[114]
Winner, Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 85th Academy Awards[114]
Winner, Best Cinematography Award at the Los Angeles Film Critics Association awards[115]
Winner, Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song at the 70th Golden Globe Awards[116]
Winner, BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Film at the 66th British Academy Film Awards[117]
Winner, BAFTA Award for Best Film Music at the 66th British Academy Film Awards[117]
Nominated, Academy Award for Best Sound Mixing at the 85th Academy Awards[114]
Nominated, Academy Award for Best Cinematography at the 85th Academy Awards[114]
Nominated, Academy Award for Best Original Score at the 85th Academy Awards[114]
Spectre 2015 Craig, DanielDaniel Craig 64% (312 reviews)[118] 60 (48 reviews)[119] A-[120] Winner, Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 88th Academy Awards

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Prior to the release of Skyfall in 2012, the James Bond series had grossed approximately $12.5 billion at 2011 prices;[7] after factoring in earnings of almost $2 billion from Skyfall and Spectre, the series has earned at least $14 billion adjusted for inflation.
  2. ^ Balio (p. 260) sets Connery's compensation for Dr. No at $154,000: $54,000 as salary and $100,000 as a bonus.
  3. ^ Balio (p. 262) claims Connery was paid a straight 12.5% of the gross. Diamonds are Forever grossed $42 million so Connery received over $5 million from which he gave $1.25 million to the Scottish International Education Trust.
  4. ^ The official production budget for Spectre has been debated. Estimates range from $245—250[47][48][49][50] to as high as $300—350 million[51][52] The $350 million figure also incorporates the $100 million marketing budget.[53] $21.5 million was spent on television advertisements and a further $100 million was spent on promotion and advertising.[48]

References

  1. ^ a b Poliakoff, Keith (2000). "License to Copyright – The Ongoing Dispute Over the Ownership of James Bond". Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law Journal. Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. 18: 387–436. 
  2. ^ Shprintz, Janet (29 March 1999). "Big Bond-holder". Variety. Retrieved 4 November 2011. Judge Rafeedie ... found that McClory's rights in the "Thunderball" material had reverted to the estate of Fleming 
  3. ^ a b Chapman 2009, p. 5.
  4. ^ Chapman 2009, p. 43.
  5. ^ Judge M. Margaret McKeown (27 August 2001). "Danjaq et al. v. Sony Corporation et al" (PDF). United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 October 2006. Retrieved 27 November 2006. in 1962 ... Danjaq teamed up with United Artists to produce Bond films. 
  6. ^ a b "Movie Franchises". The Numbers. Nash Information Services. Retrieved 3 January 2013. 
  7. ^ The Economist online (11 July 2011). "Pottering on, and on". The Economist. Retrieved 4 January 2012. 
  8. ^ a b "The 54th Academy Awards (1982)". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Retrieved 27 October 2011. 
  9. ^ a b Balio 1987, p. 255.
  10. ^ "Casino Royale (1967)". Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Retrieved 8 September 2011. 
  11. ^ a b c "The Lost Bond". Total Film. Future Publishing. 27 February 2008. Retrieved 13 October 2011. 
  12. ^ a b "Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. announces acquisition of Never Say Never Again James Bond assets" (Press release). Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 4 December 1997. Archived from the original on 5 May 2008. Retrieved 16 March 2008. 
  13. ^ a b Sterngold, James (30 March 1999). "Sony Pictures, in an accord with MGM, drops its plan to produce new James Bond films". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 March 2008. 
  14. ^ Barnes & Hearn 2001, p. 8.
  15. ^ Cork & Stutz 2007, p. 270.
  16. ^ Field & Chowdhury 2015, pp. 187-8.
  17. ^ Inside On Her Majesty's Secret Service (DVD). OHMSS Ultimate Edition DVD: MGM Home Entertainment Inc. 2000. 
  18. ^ Feeney Callan, Michael (2002). Sean Connery. Virgin Books. p. 217. ISBN 1-85227-992-3. 
  19. ^ Inside Live and Let Die: Live and Let Die Ultimate Edition, Disc 2 (NTSC, Widescreen, Closed-captioned) (DVD). MGM/UA Home Video. 2000. ASIN: B000LY209E. 
  20. ^ Inside the Spy Who Loved Me. The Spy Who Loved Me Ultimate Edition DVD, Disk 2
  21. ^ Field & Chowdhury 2015, pp. 382.
  22. ^ Inside For Your Eyes Only (DVD). MGM Home Entertainment. 2000. 
  23. ^ Field & Chowdhury 2015, pp. 427.
  24. ^ Sothcott, Jonathan (20 May 2014). "In praise of Timothy Dalton". GQ. Retrieved 3 January 2016. 
  25. ^ "Hollywood mogul puts $US200m price on James Bond's head; Albert "Cubby" Broccoli". The Sunday Times. 12 August 1990. 
  26. ^ Blauvelt, Christian (1 November 2010). "Timothy Dalton talks 'Chuck,' 'The Tourist,' and, of course, Bond". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 12 August 2014. 
  27. ^ Cox, Dan (12 April 1994). "Dalton bails out as Bond". Variety. 
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Bibliography

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