List of Hot Country Singles number ones of 1972

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A bearded man wearing dark glasses and a cap, playing a guitar
Hank Williams, Jr. (pictured in 2006) achieved his second number one in 1972 with "Eleven Roses", although he had not yet developed the country rock style with which he would find his greatest success.[1]

Hot Country Songs is a chart that ranks the top-performing country music songs in the United States, published by Billboard magazine. In 1972, 27 different singles topped the chart, then published under the title Hot Country Singles, in 53 issues of the magazine, based on playlists submitted by country music radio stations and sales reports submitted by stores.[2]

At the start of the year, the number one single was "Kiss an Angel Good Mornin'" by Charley Pride, which had been in the top spot since the issue of Billboard dated December 4, 1971,[3] and held the position for one further week in 1972. Freddie Hart spent the most weeks at number one in 1972, totalling 11 weeks in the top spot with "My Hang-Up Is You", "Bless Your Heart" and "Got the All Overs for You (All Over Me)". "My Hang-Up Is You" had the longest unbroken run at number one, spending six weeks at the top of the chart in the spring, twice as long as any other song spent at number one in 1972. Hart had been an active recording artist since the early 1950s and had his first Hot Country hit in 1959, but had never reached the top 10 until 1971, when "Easy Loving" went to number one and began a run of top 10 hits which lasted until 1975, when his chart performance began to decline again.[4][5] In addition to Hart, Charley Pride and Merle Haggard each achieved three number ones in 1972, spending seven and six weeks respectively at the top of the chart.

Three artists topped the chart for the first time in 1972. Donna Fargo spent three weeks at number one in June with her first ever hit, "The Happiest Girl in the Whole U.S.A.",[6] and went on to gain her second number one in the fall with "Funny Face". Jerry Wallace achieved the only country chart-topper of his career with "If You Leave Me Tonight I'll Cry", which spent two non-consecutive weeks at number one after being featured in an episode of the TV show Night Gallery.[7][8] Finally, Mel Tillis topped the chart for the first time with "I Ain't Never", more than a decade after he had first charted in Billboard.[9] Tillis co-wrote the song with Webb Pierce, whose version went to number 2 on the chart in 1959, but Tillis did not record the song until 1972, when he went one better than Pierce to gain his first number one.[10] The final number one of the year was "She's Got to Be a Saint" by another singer who had been charting since the 1950s, Ray Price.[11] Every number one in 1972 was by a solo artist; no bands topped the chart during the year.

Chart history

A dark-haired man in a tuxedo, smiling broadly
After more than a decade of hits without ever reaching the top 10, Freddie Hart had reached number one for the first time in 1971 and continued his run of success in 1972.
A woman with long brown curly hair, wearing a yellow top and blue pants, singing into a microphone
Donna Fargo began her chart career with a number one and quickly followed it up with a second.
A grey-haired man in a black jacket and white pants, singing into a microphone
Mel Tillis (pictured in 2007) achieved his first number one, more than a decade after he first entered the chart.
Issue date Title Artist(s) Ref.
January 1 "Kiss an Angel Good Mornin'" Charley Pride [12]
January 8 "Would You Take Another Chance on Me" / "Me and Bobby McGee"[a] Jerry Lee Lewis [13]
January 15 "Carolyn" Merle Haggard [14]
January 22 [15]
January 29 [16]
February 5 "One's on the Way" Loretta Lynn [17]
February 12 [18]
February 19 "It's Four in the Morning" Faron Young [19]
February 26 [20]
March 4 "Bedtime Story" Tammy Wynette [21]
March 11 "My Hang-Up Is You" Freddie Hart [22]
March 18 [23]
March 25 [24]
April 1 [25]
April 8 [26]
April 15 [27]
April 22 "Chantilly Lace" Jerry Lee Lewis [28]
April 29 [29]
May 6 [30]
May 13 "Grandma Harp" Merle Haggard [31]
May 20 [32]
May 27 "(Lost Her Love) On Our Last Date" Conway Twitty [33]
June 3 "The Happiest Girl in the Whole U.S.A." Donna Fargo [34]
June 10 [35]
June 17 [36]
June 24 "That's Why I Love You Like I Do" Sonny James [37]
July 1 "Eleven Roses" Hank Williams, Jr. [38]
July 8 [39]
July 15 "Made in Japan" Buck Owens [40]
July 22 "It's Gonna Take a Little Bit Longer" Charley Pride [41]
July 29 [42]
August 5 [43]
August 12 "Bless Your Heart" Freddie Hart [44]
August 19 [45]
August 26 "If You Leave Me Tonight I'll Cry" Jerry Wallace [46]
September 2 "Woman (Sensuous Woman)" Don Gibson [47]
September 9 "If You Leave Me Tonight I'll Cry" Jerry Wallace [48]
September 16 "When the Snow Is on the Roses" Sonny James [49]
September 23 "I Can't Stop Loving You" Conway Twitty [50]
September 30 "I Ain't Never" Mel Tillis [51]
October 7 [52]
October 14 "Funny Face" Donna Fargo [53]
October 21 [54]
October 28 [55]
November 4 "It's Not Love (But It's Not Bad)" Merle Haggard [56]
November 11 "My Man (Understands)" Tammy Wynette [57]
November 18 "She's Too Good to Be True" Charley Pride [58]
November 25 [59]
December 2 [60]
December 9 "Got the All Overs for You (All Over Me)" Freddie Hart [61]
December 16 [62]
December 23 [63]
December 30 "She's Got to Be a Saint" Ray Price [64]

a. ^ Double A-sided single

See also

References

  1. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Hank Williams , Jr. Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2005). Joel Whitburn's Top Country Songs: 1944-2005. Record Research. p. ix. ISBN 9780898201659.
  3. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 4, 1971". Billboard. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  4. ^ Adams, Greg. "Freddie Hart Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  5. ^ "Freddie Hart Chart History". Billboard. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  6. ^ McCall, Michael; Rumble, John; Kingsbury, Paul (2012). The Encyclopedia of Country Music. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199920839.
  7. ^ Ankeny, Jason. "Jerry Wallace Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  8. ^ "Jerry Wallace Chart History". Billboard. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  9. ^ "Mel Tillis Chart History". Billboard. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  10. ^ Freeman, Jon; Betts, Stephen L. (November 20, 2017). "10 Great Songs You Didn't Know Mel Tillis Wrote". Rolling Stone. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  11. ^ Cooper, Dan. "Ray Price Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  12. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for January 1, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  13. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for January 8, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  14. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for January 15, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  15. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for January 22, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  16. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for January 29, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  17. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for February 5, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  18. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for February 12, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  19. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for February 19, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  20. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for February 26, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  21. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for March 4, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  22. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for March 11, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  23. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for March 18, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  24. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for March 25, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  25. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for April 1, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  26. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for April 8, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  27. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for April 15, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  28. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for April 22, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  29. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for April 29, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  30. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for May 6, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  31. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for May 13, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  32. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for May 20, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  33. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for May 27, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  34. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for June 3, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  35. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for June 10, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  36. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for June 17, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  37. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for June 24, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  38. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for July 1, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  39. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for July 8, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  40. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for July 15, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  41. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for July 22, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  42. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for July 29, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  43. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for August 5, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  44. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for August 12, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  45. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for August 19, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  46. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for August 26, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  47. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for September 2, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  48. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for September 9, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  49. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for September 16, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  50. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for September 23, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  51. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for September 30, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  52. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for October 7, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  53. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for October 14, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  54. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for October 21, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  55. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for October 28, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  56. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for November 4, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  57. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for November 11, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  58. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for November 18, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  59. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for November 25, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  60. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 2, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  61. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 9, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  62. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 16, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  63. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 23, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
  64. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 30, 1972". Billboard. Retrieved October 4, 2010.
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