List of DFB-Pokal winning managers

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Niko Kovač is the reigning DFB-Pokal winning manager.

The list of DFB-Pokal winning managers contains all the managers who have led their respective team to success in the DFB-Pokal.[1] The DFB-Pokal has been played since 1952, although the Tschammerpokal, its predecessor, took place from 1935 to 1943. Since then, 52 coaches have won a Cup victory. Of these, 37 are German, 4 Yugoslav and Austrian, 3 Dutch, and an Italian, Hungarian, Spaniard and Croatian.

Six coaches have won the trophy three times. Hennes Weisweiler was the first to do so in 1978. The other three-time winners are Karl-Heinz Feldkamp (with three different teams), Ottmar Hitzfeld, Udo Lattek, Otto Rehhagel, and Thomas Schaaf. The most successful foreign coaches are Zlatko Čajkovski, Pep Guardiola, and Huub Stevens with two titles. Richard Michalke won the first cup competition in 1935 with 1. FC Nürnberg. The Austrian Leopold Nitsch won in 1938, making him the first foreign manager to win. In 1941, Georg Köhler became the first manager to successfully defend the title. In 2005, Felix Magath became the first coach to complete consecutive league and cup doubles. Hans Meyer is the only manager to win both the DFB-Pokal and the FDGB-Pokal, the cup competition of East Germany.

A total of five people have won the cup as both player and manager. Ludwig Janda won as a player in 1942 with 1860 Munich and as a manager in 1956 with Karlsruher SC. Alfred Schmidt also did so while playing for Borussia Dortmund in 1965 and managing Kickers Offenbach in 1970.[note 1] Thomas Schaaf won the DFB-Pokal with the same club, after winning as a player for Werder Bremen in 1991 and 1994, and as manager in 1999, 2004, and 2009. He is also the only person to have won the cup as both player and manager with multiple titles during his playing career. Jupp Heynckes won as a player with Borussia Mönchengladbach in 1973 and as a manager with Bayern Munich in 2013. Niko Kovač is the most recent manager to have achieved the feat, winning in 2003 as a player with Bayern and in 2018 and 2019 as manager of Eintracht Frankfurt and Bayern Munich, respectively.[3] Schaaf and Kovač are the only managers to have won titles as a player and manager with the same club, having done so for Werder Bremen and Bayern Munich, respectively. They are also the only people to have won the cup as both player and manager with multiple titles during their managerial career

Winning managers

Zlatko Čajkovski (right) is the most successful foreign manager along with Huub Stevens and Pep Guardiola.
Hennes Weisweiler was the first to win the trophy three times.
Udo Lattek won the trophy thrice with Bayern Munich.
Otto Rehhagel also won the DFB-Pokal three times.
Ottmar Hitzfeld was also a three-time cup winner with Bayern Munich.
Thomas Schaaf won the cup three times with Werder Bremen
Hans Meyer became the first manager to win both the FDGB-Pokal and the DFB-Pokal.

Tschammerpokal

Year Manager Club
1935 Germany Richard Michalke[4] 1. FC Nürnberg
1936 Germany Heinrich Pfaff[5] VfB Leipzig
1937 Germany Hans Schmidt[6] Schalke 04
1938 Germany Leopold Nitsch[7][note 2] Rapid Wien
1939 Germany Alwin Riemke[8] 1. FC Nürnberg
1940 Germany Georg Köhler[9] Dresdner SC
1941 Germany Georg Köhler[9] Dresdner SC
1942 Germany Max Schäfer[10] 1860 Munich
1943 Germany Fritz Gschweidl[9][note 2] First Vienna

DFB-Pokal

Season Manager Club
1952–53 West Germany Karl Hohmann[11] Rot-Weiss Essen
1953–54 West Germany Georg Wurzer VfB Stuttgart
1954–55 Austria Adolf Patek Karlsruher SC
1955–56 West Germany Ludwig Janda Karlsruher SC
1956–57 West Germany Willibald Hahn[12] Bayern Munich
1957–58 West Germany Georg Wurzer VfB Stuttgart
1958–59 West Germany Hans Wendlandt Schwarz-Weiß Essen
1959–60 West Germany Bernd Oles[13] Borussia München Gladbach
1960–61 West Germany Georg Knöpfle[14] Werder Bremen
1961–62 West Germany Herbert Widmayer 1. FC Nürnberg
1962–63 West Germany Martin Wilke[15] Hamburger SV
1963–64 Austria Max Merkel[16] 1860 Munich
1964–65 West Germany Hermann Eppenhoff[17] Borussia Dortmund
1965–66 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Zlatko Čajkovski[12] Bayern Munich
1966–67 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Zlatko Čajkovski[12] Bayern Munich
1967–68 West Germany Willi Multhaup[18] 1. FC Köln
1968–69 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Branko Zebec[12] Bayern Munich
1969–70 West Germany Kurt Schreiner[note 1] Kickers Offenbach
1970–71 West Germany Udo Lattek[12] Bayern Munich
1971–72 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Ivica Horvat[19] Schalke 04
1972–73 West Germany Hennes Weisweiler[13] Borussia Mönchengladbach
1973–74 West Germany Dietrich Weise[20] Eintracht Frankfurt
1974–75 West Germany Dietrich Weise[20] Eintracht Frankfurt
1975–76 West Germany Kuno Klötzer[15] Hamburger SV
1976–77 West Germany Hennes Weisweiler[18] 1. FC Köln
1977–78 West Germany Hennes Weisweiler[18] 1. FC Köln
1978–79 West Germany Hans-Dieter Tippenhauer[21] Fortuna Düsseldorf
1979–80 West Germany Otto Rehhagel[21] Fortuna Düsseldorf
1980–81 West Germany Lothar Buchmann[20] Eintracht Frankfurt
1981–82 Hungary Pál Csernai[12] Bayern Munich
1982–83 Netherlands Rinus Michels[18] 1. FC Köln
1983–84 West Germany Udo Lattek[12] Bayern Munich
1984–85 West Germany Karl-Heinz Feldkamp[22] Bayer Uerdingen
1985–86 West Germany Udo Lattek[12] Bayern Munich
1986–87 Austria Ernst Happel[15] Hamburger SV
1987–88 West Germany Karl-Heinz Feldkamp[20] Eintracht Frankfurt
1988–89 West Germany Horst Köppel[17] Borussia Dortmund
1989–90 West Germany Karl-Heinz Feldkamp[23] 1. FC Kaiserslautern
1990–91 Germany Otto Rehhagel[24] Werder Bremen
1991–92 Germany Michael Lorkowski[25] Hannover 96
1992–93 Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Dragoslav Stepanović[26] Bayer Leverkusen
1993–94 Germany Otto Rehhagel[24] Werder Bremen
1994–95 Germany Bernd Krauss[13] Borussia Mönchengladbach
1995–96 Germany Eckhard Krautzun[27] 1. FC Kaiserslautern
1996–97 Germany Joachim Löw VfB Stuttgart
1997–98 Italy Giovanni Trapattoni[12] Bayern Munich
1998–99 Germany Thomas Schaaf[24] Werder Bremen
1999–2000 Germany Ottmar Hitzfeld[12] Bayern Munich
2000–01 Netherlands Huub Stevens[28] Schalke 04
2001–02 Netherlands Huub Stevens[28] Schalke 04
2002–03 Germany Ottmar Hitzfeld[12] Bayern Munich
2003–04 Germany Thomas Schaaf[24] Werder Bremen
2004–05 Germany Felix Magath[12] Bayern Munich
2005–06 Germany Felix Magath[12] Bayern Munich
2006–07 Germany Hans Meyer[29] 1. FC Nürnberg
2007–08 Germany Ottmar Hitzfeld[12] Bayern Munich
2008–09 Germany Thomas Schaaf[30] Werder Bremen
2009–10 Netherlands Louis van Gaal[12] Bayern Munich
2010–11 Germany Ralf Rangnick Schalke 04
2011–12 Germany Jürgen Klopp[31] Borussia Dortmund
2012–13 Germany Jupp Heynckes Bayern Munich
2013–14 Spain Pep Guardiola Bayern Munich
2014–15 Germany Dieter Hecking VfL Wolfsburg
2015–16 Spain Pep Guardiola Bayern Munich
2016–17 Germany Thomas Tuchel Borussia Dortmund
2017–18 Croatia Niko Kovač Eintracht Frankfurt
2018–19 Croatia Niko Kovač Bayern Munich

Ranking

By individual

Rank Name Titles Years
1 West Germany Karl-Heinz Feldkamp 3 1985, 1988, 1990
Germany Ottmar Hitzfeld 3 2000, 2003, 2008
West Germany Udo Lattek 3 1971, 1984, 1986
Germany Otto Rehhagel 3 1980, 1991, 1994
Germany Thomas Schaaf 3 1999, 2004, 2009
West Germany Hennes Weisweiler 3 1973, 1977, 1978
7 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Zlatko Čajkovski 2 1966, 1967
Spain Pep Guardiola 2 2014, 2016
Germany Georg Köhler 2 1940, 1941
Croatia Niko Kovač 2 2018, 2019
Germany Felix Magath 2 2005, 2006
Netherlands Huub Stevens 2 2001, 2002
West Germany Dietrich Weise 2 1974, 1975
West Germany Georg Wurzer 2 1954, 1958

By nationality

Rank Country Titles
1 Germany /  Germany 58
2  Yugoslavia /  FR Yugoslavia 5
3  Netherlands 4
 Austria 4
5  Croatia 2
 Spain 2
7  Italy 1
 Hungary 1

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Though Alfred Schmidt was manager of Kickers Offenbach at the time of the 1970 DFB-Pokal Final, he was not on the bench following a car accident, and was instead represented by Kurt Schreiner.[2]
  2. ^ a b As a result of the annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany on 13 March 1938, both managers had become German citizens.

References

  1. ^ "Alle DFB-Pokalsieger". dfb.de (in German). Deutscher Fußball-Bund. Retrieved 3 September 2014.
  2. ^ "Heynckes schreibt Geschichte" [Heynckes writes history] (in German). Focus. 2 June 2013. Retrieved 24 April 2019.
  3. ^ "Volkswagen Data Service – Postmatch Finale: Bayern München 1–3 Eintracht Frankfurt (DFB-Pokal 2017/18)" [Volkswagen Data Service – Final post-match: Bayern Munich 1–3 Eintracht Frankfurt (2017–18 DFB-Pokal)] (PDF). DFB.de (in German). German Football Association. 19 May 2018. Retrieved 21 May 2018.
  4. ^ Libero Spezial Deutsch; No. D14, 1996, Seite 20
  5. ^ Libero Spezial Deutsch; No. D14, 1996, Seite 37
  6. ^ 100-schalker-jahre.de: "15. August 2004: Vor 71 Jahren trat Schalkes erster Meistertrainer „Bumbas" Schmidt sein Amt an". Archived from the original on 3 September 2004. Retrieved 25 July 2011.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  7. ^ "Trainer". rapidarchiv.at (in German). SK Rapid Wien. Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  8. ^ "1939/40: 1. FCN – Waldhof Mannheim". fcn.de (in German). 1. FC Nürnberg. Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Hardy Grüne (1996), Vom Kronprinzen bis zur Bundesliga. 1890 bis 1963. Enzyklopädie des deutschen Ligafußballs – Band 1 (in German), Kassel: Agon-Sportverlag, pp. 90, 240, ISBN 3-928562-85-1
  10. ^ "Max Schäfer". weltfussball.de (in German). Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  11. ^ revierkick.de: Der „erste“ Pott geht ins Revier
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o südkurve.com: Die Trainer
  13. ^ a b c borussia.de: Die bisherigen Borussia-Trainer ab 1946:
  14. ^ werder.de: "Pokalsieger 1961 – keiner wartete auf Werder". Archived from the original on 23 December 2005. Retrieved 3 August 2016.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  15. ^ a b c hsv-hshnordbankarena.de: "Erfolge – DFB-Pokal". Archived from the original on 16 April 2009. Retrieved 3 August 2016.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  16. ^ Claudius Mayer, TSV München von 1860 (Hrsg.): Geschichte eines Traditionsvereins – TSV München von 1860 (erweiterte 3. Auflage). Gotteswinter Verlag, München 2007, ISBN 3-00-002204-X, S. 72 ff
  17. ^ a b bvb.de: Trainer des BVB
  18. ^ a b c d fc-koeln.de: Die FC-Trainer
  19. ^ revierkick.de: FC Schalke 04 Vize-Meister und Pokalsieger 1972
  20. ^ a b c d eintracht.de: Trainer der Bundesliga-Mannschaft Archived 11 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  21. ^ a b fortuna-düsseldorf.de: Chronologie Trainer Archived 25 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  22. ^ fussballdaten.de: Karl-Heinz Feldkamp
  23. ^ swr.de: Hölle oder Paradies? – Die Geschichte des FCK
  24. ^ a b c d Arnd Zeigler (2003), Das W auf dem Trikot – 40 Jahre Werder Bremen in der Bundesliga (in German), Bremen: Edition Temmen, p. 573, ISBN 3-86108-695-6
  25. ^ hannover96.de "Historie". Archived from the original on 26 April 2009. Retrieved 25 January 2009.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  26. ^ bayer04.de: „Feier mit den Fans war das schönste am Pokalsieg“ Archived 26 January 2017 at the Wayback Machine
  27. ^ der-betze-brennt.de: Die Erfolge des 1. FC Kaiserslautern
  28. ^ a b schalke04.de: "Die Jahrhundertelf". Archived from the original on 4 June 2009. Retrieved 3 August 2016.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  29. ^ fcn.de: Traum wird wahr – Club holt den Cup!
  30. ^ werder.de: 1:0 – Werder bejubelt historischen DFB-Pokalsieg
  31. ^ kicker.de: Lewandowski macht das Double perfekt
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