List of Arsenal F.C. seasons

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A black-and-white team photograph of the Arsenal squad in their third season of existence.
The Royal Arsenal squad of the 1888–89 season

Arsenal Football Club is an English professional association football club based in Holloway, London. The club was formed in Woolwich in 1886 as Dial Square before it was shortly renamed to Royal Arsenal, and then Woolwich Arsenal in 1893.[1] They became the first southern member[a] admitted into the Football League in 1893, having spent their first four seasons solely participating in cup tournaments and friendlies.[4] The club's name was shortened to Arsenal in 1914, a year after moving to Highbury.[5] In spite of finishing fifth in the Second Division in 1915, Arsenal rejoined the First Division at the expense of local rivals Tottenham Hotspur when football resumed after the First World War.[6] Since that time, they have not fallen below the first tier of the English football league system and hold the record for the longest uninterrupted time in the top flight.[7]

In the 1930s, Arsenal were the dominant side of England, winning five league championships and two FA Cups. Their fortunes waned, but the club soon enjoyed infrequent periods of success, including Inter-Cities Fairs Cup triumph and a first league and cup double in the 1970s. During the late 1980s, Arsenal had built a side that threatened Liverpool's league dominance, and performed greatly in cup competitions. The club played an active role in the formation of the Premier League in 1992, and two doubles followed in 1998 and 2002. Arsenal made league history in 2003–04 when they became the first team in a 38-game season to go unbeaten.[8] In the 2000s, Arsenal were finalists in both the UEFA Cup and UEFA Champions League,[9] and have since equalled Real Madrid's record for most consecutive seasons in the latter competition.[10]

As at the end of the 2015–16 season, the club's first team had spent 106 seasons in the top division of English football, and 13 in the second. Their worst league finish to date is 10th in the second tier, their placing at the end of the 1896–97 season. Arsenal's best-ever start to a Premier League season came in 2007–08, when they won 11 of their first 14 matches.[11] The club's longest period without a competitive honour is 31 years, between the 1889–90 and 1921–22 seasons. Ted Drake holds the record for most competitive goals in a single season for Arsenal; he scored 44 during the 1934–35 campaign. The table details the club's achievements in major competitions, and the top scorers for each season. Records of competitions such as the London Combination and the London War Cup are not included.

History

When Arsenal was founded in 1886 by munition workers' from Woolwich, the club resisted the lure of professionalism and remained an amateur side.[12] Success in local cup competitions soon followed, and a tie against Derby County in the FA Cup on 17 January 1891 led to the opposition approaching two of Arsenal's players, in view of offering them professional contracts.[12] Later that year the club resigned its membership of the Kent County and London Football Associations – both amateur governing bodies – and voted to turn professional, a move which attracted criticism from many southern clubs.[12][b] In 1893, the club received an invitation to join the Football League, which the board accepted.[12] Arsenal played in the Second Division for eleven seasons, while also participating in regional competitions, the Southern Combination and United League.[14] The club won promotion in 1904, and enjoyed strong FA Cup campaigns in the mid-1900s, but the increase of football clubs in the capital and falling attendances at the Manor Ground pushed Arsenal close to bankruptcy by 1910.[15] Sir Henry Norris and William Hall in that year took over Arsenal, and planned to relocate the team to Highbury in order to improve their financial standing.[15] Arsenal were relegated back to the Second Division in 1913, but the move to North London brought about larger attendances than ever before.[16]

A football pitch with "Highbury 1913–2006" emblazoned on the grass: Arsenal played home matches at Highbury between those years.
A valedictory campaign was held at Highbury during 2005–06, to mark Arsenal's final season at the ground.[17]

In 1919, Norris arranged for the club's promotion back to the First Division, in contentious circumstances.[18] With increased financial resources, the club established themselves as a permanent fixture in the division and was better able to spend money on new players.[19] In 1930, Arsenal beat Newcastle United to win its first major piece of silverware: the FA Cup.[20] Success continued right throughout the decade,[21] as they won five league championships and a further FA Cup in seven years.[22] Following the Second World War, Arsenal won two more championships and a FA Cup, but their fortunes gradually declined.[23] It was not until 1970 that the club won another trophy – the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup,[24] a European club competition designed to promote trade fairs.[25] A first league and cup double was completed a year later; by the end of the decade Arsenal added another FA Cup, beating Manchester United in the 1979 final.[26][27] 1980 saw Arsenal lose two finals in quick succession, defeated by West Ham United in the FA Cup final and then to Valencia in the Cup Winners' Cup on penalties.[28] The club won their first League Cup in 1987, but a year later failed to retain the trophy as outsiders Luton Town beat them in the final.[29] In 1989, Arsenal won their first league championship in 18 years, courtesy of Michael Thomas' last-minute goal against closest challengers Liverpool in the final game of the season.[30] The club did not build on their success, finishing fourth the following season, but regained the title in 1991.[31][32] As champions, Arsenal were eligible to play in the European Cup,[c] but their time in the competition ended abruptly as they were eliminated in the second round to Benfica.[35]

The growth of commercialism in English football during the late 1980s and early 1990s paved the way for Arsenal and other prominent clubs to seek the possibility of setting up a new top-flight division.[36] Unhappy with how income was distributed to the lower leagues and wanting to exploit television rights, Arsenal and 21 other First Division clubs handed a notice of resignation from the Football League by August 1991.[37] The breakway division, entitled the Premier League, was administered by The Football Association and received financial backing from Sky Television.[38][39] Arsenal finished 10th in the inaugural season;[40] the club did well in other competitions, winning a unique FA and League Cup double.[41] They were victorious in the 1994 Cup Winners' Cup Final,[42] and came close to defending the trophy in 1995, before losing to Real Zaragoza.[43]

Arsenal added more league and cup doubles in 1998 and 2002,[44] and in 2004 became the first club in Premier League history to win the title without a single defeat.[45] The side, nicknamed "The Invincibles" remained unbeaten for 49 games, before losing to Manchester United in October 2004.[46] In 2006, Arsenal reached their first UEFA Champions League final but Barcelona scored twice in the second half to win the competition.[47] Later that year, Arsenal moved to the Emirates Stadium which commenced a transitional period.[48] Though the club strengthened their position in the league's "top four" and frequently participated in the Champions League, they struggled to hold on to their best players.[49] In 2011–12, Arsenal made their worst start to a season for 58 years,[50] but a strong finish saw the club overtake rivals Tottenham Hotspur to third position.[51] After nine years without silverware, the club beat Hull City to win the 2014 FA Cup Final and retained the trophy with a dominant display against Aston Villa in 2015.[52][53]

Key

Key to league competitions:

Seasons

Results of league and cup competitions by season
Season Division P W D L F A Pts Pos FA Cup[55][d] League
Cup
[56]
Community
Shield
[56]
Competition Result Name Goals
League[57] Other / Europe[58][e] Top goalscorer[f]
1886–87 &
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
é
&
&
&
&
&
n/a &
1887–88 &
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
é
&
&
&
London Senior Cup R2 n/a &
1888–89 &
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
é
&
&
&
London Senior Cup

SF

R3
Beardsley, FredFred Beardsley 4
1889–90 &
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
é
QR4 &
&
London Senior Cup

RU

W

W
Robertson, HopeHope Robertson 15
1890–91 &
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
é
R1 &
&
London Senior Cup

W

SF
Barbour, HumphreyHumphrey Barbour 7
1891–92 &
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
é
R1 &
&
&
&
Davie, GeorgeGeorge Davie 1
1892–93 &
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
é
R1 &
&
&
&
Booth, CharlesCharles Booth
Henderson, JamesJames Henderson
5
1893–94 Div 2 28 12 4 12 52 55 28 9th R1 &
&
&
&
Henderson, JamesJames Henderson 19
1894–95 Div 2 30 14 6 10 75 58 34 8th R1 &
&
&
&
Mortimer, PeterPeter Mortimer 14
1895–96 Div 2 30 14 4 12 58 42 32 7th R1 &
&
&
&
Boyd, HenryHenry Boyd 13
1896–97 Div 2

United[g]
30

14
13

6
4

3
13

5
68

28
70

34
30

15
10th

3rd
QR5 &
&
&
&
O'Brien, PatrickPatrick O'Brien 20
1897–98 Div 2

United
30

16
16

8
5

5
9

3
69

35
49

24
37

21
5th

3rd
R1 &
&
&
&
Hunt, FergusFergus Hunt 16
1898–99 Div 2

United
34

20
18

10
5

4
11

6
72

40
41

30
31

24
7th

3rd
R1 &
&
&
&
Hunt, FergusFergus Hunt 26
1899–1900 Div 2

S Comb
34

16
16

8
4

1
14

7
61

27
43

22
36

17
8th

4th
QR3 &
&
&
&
Gaudie, RalphRalph Gaudie 17
1900–01 Div 2 34 15 6 13 39 35 36 7th R2 &
&
&
&
Gaudie, RalphRalph Gaudie 8
1901–02 Div 2

Lon Lge
34

16
18

2
6

2
10

4
50

9
26

13
42

6
4th

5th
R1 &
&
&
&
Briercliffe, TommyTommy Briercliffe 12
1902–03 Div 2

Lon Lge
34

10
20

6
8

0
6

4
66

14
30

10
48

12
3rd

3rd
R1 &
&
&
&
Coleman, TimTim Coleman 22
1903–04 Div 2 promoted

Lon Lge
34

12
21

6
7

2
6

4
91

24
22

19
49

14
2nd

3rd
R2 &
&
&
&
Shanks, TommyTommy Shanks 25
1904–05 Div 1 34 12 9 13 36 40 33 10th R1 &
&
&
&
Satterthwaite, CharlieCharlie Satterthwaite 11
1905–06 Div 1 38 15 7 16 62 64 37 12th SF &
&
&
&
Coleman, TimTim Coleman 15
1906–07 Div 1 38 20 4 14 66 59 44 7th SF &
&
&
&
Satterthwaite, CharlieCharlie Satterthwaite 19
1907–08 Div 1 38 12 12 14 51 63 36 14th[h] R1 &
&
&
&
Kyle, PeterPeter Kyle 9
1908–09 Div 1 38 14 10 14 52 49 38 6th R2 &
&
London Challenge Cup SF Fitchie, ThomasThomas Fitchie 10
1909–10 Div 1 38 11 9 18 37 67 31 18th R2 &
&
London Challenge Cup R2 Lewis, CharlesCharles Lewis 8
1910–11 Div 1 38 13 12 13 41 49 38 10th R2 &
&
London Challenge Cup R2 Chalmers, JackieJackie Chalmers 16
1911–12 Div 1 38 15 8 15 55 59 38 10th R1 &
&
London Challenge Cup R2 Common, AlfAlf Common 19
1912–13 Div 1 relegated 38 3 12 23 26 74 18 20th R2 &
&
London Challenge Cup R1 Charles Lewis 4
1913–14 Div 2 38 20 9 9 54 38 49 3rd R1 &
&
London Challenge Cup SF Flanagan, PatPat Flanagan 12
1914–15 Div 2 promoted[i] 38 19 5 14 69 41 43 5th[j] R2 &
&
London Challenge Cup RU King, HarryHarry King 33
1915–19[k] &
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
é
&
&
&
&
&
n/a &
1919–20 Div 1 42 15 12 15 56 58 42 10th R2 &
&
London Challenge Cup R2 White, HenryHenry White 15
1920–21 Div 1 42 15 14 13 59 63 44 9th R1 &
&
London Challenge Cup R3 Pagnam, FredFred Pagnam 18
1921–22 Div 1 42 15 7 20 47 56 37 7th QF &
&
London Challenge Cup W White, HenryHenry White 22
1922–23 Div 1 42 16 10 16 61 62 42 11th R1 &
&
London Challenge Cup R2 Turnbull, BobBob Turnbull 21
1923–24 Div 1 42 12 9 21 40 63 33 19th R2 &
&
London Challenge Cup W Woods, HarryHarry Woods 12
1924–25 Div 1 42 14 5 23 46 58 33 20th R1 &
&
London Challenge Cup R2 Brain, JimmyJimmy Brain 15
1925–26 Div 1 42 22 8 12 87 63 52 2nd QF &
&
London Challenge Cup RU Brain, JimmyJimmy Brain 43
1926–27 Div 1 42 17 9 16 77 86 43 11th RU &
&
London Challenge Cup R1 Brain, JimmyJimmy Brain 34
1927–28 Div 1 42 13 15 14 82 86 41 10th SF &
&
London Challenge Cup R1 Brain, JimmyJimmy Brain 29
1928–29 Div 1 42 16 13 13 77 72 45 9th QF &
&
London Challenge Cup R1 Jack, DavidDavid Jack 26
1929–30 Div 1 42 14 11 17 78 66 39 14th W &
&
London Challenge Cup R1 Lambert, JackJack Lambert 23
1930–31 Div 1 42 28 10 4 127 59 66 1st R4 &
W London Challenge Cup W Lambert, JackJack Lambert 39
1931–32 Div 1 42 22 10 10 90 48 54 2nd RU &
W London Challenge Cup R2 Lambert, JackJack Lambert 26
1932–33 Div 1 42 25 8 9 118 61 58 1st R3 &
&
London Challenge Cup SF Bastin, CliffCliff Bastin 33
1933–34 Div 1 42 25 9 8 75 47 59 1st QF &
W London Challenge Cup W Bastin, CliffCliff Bastin 15
1934–35 Div 1 42 23 12 7 115 46 58 1st QF &
W London Challenge Cup R2 Drake, TedTed Drake 44 ♦
1935–36 Div 1 42 15 15 12 78 48 45 6th W &
&
London Challenge Cup W Drake, TedTed Drake 27
1936–37 Div 1 42 18 16 8 80 49 52 3rd QF &
RU London Challenge Cup RU Drake, TedTed Drake 27
1937–38 Div 1 42 21 10 11 77 44 52 1st R5 &
&
London Challenge Cup SF Drake, TedTed Drake 18
1938–39 Div 1 42 19 9 14 55 41 47 5th R3 &
W London Challenge Cup SF Drake, TedTed Drake 16
1939–40 Div 1 3 2 1 0 8 4 5 3rd &
&
&
&
&
Drake, TedTed Drake 4
1939–45[l] &
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
é
&
&
&
&
&
n/a &
1945–46 &
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
é
R3[m] &
&
&
&
O'Flanagan, KevinKevin O'Flanagan 11
1946–47 Div 1 42 16 9 17 72 70 41 13th R3 &
&
London Challenge Cup R1 Lewis, RegReg Lewis 29
1947–48 Div 1 42 23 13 6 81 32 59 1st R3 &
&
London Challenge Cup R1 Rooke, RonnieRonnie Rooke 33 ♦
1948–49 Div 1 42 18 13 11 74 44 49 5th R4 &
W London Challenge Cup R2 Lewis, RegReg Lewis 18
1949–50 Div 1 42 19 11 12 79 55 49 6th W &
&
London Challenge Cup R1 Lewis, RegReg Lewis 24
1950–51 Div 1 42 19 9 14 73 56 47 5th R5 &
&

[n]

London Challenge Cup R1 Lishman, DougDoug Lishman 17
1951–52 Div 1 42 21 11 10 80 61 53 3rd RU &
&
London Challenge Cup R1 Lishman, DougDoug Lishman 29
1952–53 Div 1 42 21 12 9 97 64 54 1st QF &
&
London Challenge Cup R2 Lishman, DougDoug Lishman 25
1953–54 Div 1 42 15 13 14 75 73 43 12th R4 &
W London Challenge Cup W Lishman, DougDoug Lishman 20
1954–55 Div 1 42 17 9 16 69 63 43 9th R4 &
&
London Challenge Cup W Lishman, DougDoug Lishman 19
1955–56 Div 1 42 18 10 14 60 61 46 5th QF &
&
London Challenge Cup SF Tapscott, DerekDerek Tapscott 21
1956–57 Div 1 42 21 8 13 85 69 50 5th QF &
&
London Challenge Cup

SF

SF
Tapscott, DerekDerek Tapscott 32
1957–58 Div 1 42 16 7 19 73 85 39 12th R3 &
&
London Challenge Cup

W

R1
Herd, DavidDavid Herd 24
1958–59 Div 1 42 21 8 13 88 68 50 3rd R5 &
&
London Challenge Cup

SF

W
Herd, DavidDavid Herd 21
1959–60 Div 1 42 15 9 18 68 80 39 13th R3 &
&
London Challenge Cup

R2

SF
Herd, DavidDavid Herd 14
1960–61 Div 1 42 15 11 16 77 85 41 11th R3 DNE[o] &
London Challenge Cup RU Herd, DavidDavid Herd 30
1961–62 Div 1 42 16 11 15 71 72 43 10th R4 DNE &
London Challenge Cup W Skirton, AlanAlan Skirton 23
1962–63 Div 1 42 18 10 14 86 77 46 7th R5 DNE &
London Challenge Cup W Baker, JoeJoe Baker 31
1963–64 Div 1 42 17 11 14 90 82 45 8th R5 DNE &
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup

R2

R2
Strong, GeoffGeoff Strong 31
1964–65 Div 1 42 17 7 18 69 75 41 13th R4 DNE &
London Challenge Cup R1 Baker, JoeJoe Baker 25
1965–66 Div 1 42 12 13 17 62 75 37 14th R3 DNE &
London Challenge Cup RU Baker, JoeJoe Baker 13
1966–67 Div 1 42 16 14 12 58 47 46 7th R5 R3 &
London Challenge Cup R2 Graham, GeorgeGeorge Graham 12
1967–68 Div 1 42 17 10 15 60 56 44 9th R5 RU &
London Challenge Cup R1 Graham, GeorgeGeorge Graham 21
1968–69 Div 1 42 22 12 8 56 27 56 4th R5 RU &
London Challenge Cup R1 Radford, JohnJohn Radford 19
1969–70 Div 1 42 12 18 12 51 49 42 12th R3 R3 &
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup

W

R2
Radford, JohnJohn Radford 19
1970–71 Div 1 42 29 7 6 71 29 65 1st W R4 &
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup

QF

R2
Kennedy, RayRay Kennedy 16
1971–72 Div 1 42 22 8 12 58 40 52 5th RU R4 &

[p]

European Cup

QF

R2
Kennedy, RayRay Kennedy 19
1972–73 Div 1 42 23 11 8 57 43 57 2nd SF QF &
London Challenge Cup R1 Radford, JohnJohn Radford 19
1973–74 Div 1 42 14 14 14 49 51 42 10th R4 R2 &
London Challenge Cup SF Kennedy, RayRay Kennedy 13
1974–75 Div 1 42 13 11 18 47 49 37 16th QF R2 &
&
&
Kidd, BrianBrian Kidd 23
1975–76 Div 1 42 13 10 19 47 53 36 17th R3 R2 &
&
&
Kidd, BrianBrian Kidd 11
1976–77 Div 1 42 16 11 15 64 59 43 8th R5 QF &
&
&
Macdonald, MalcolmMalcolm Macdonald 29 ♦
1977–78 Div 1 42 21 10 11 60 37 52 5th RU SF &
&
&
Macdonald, MalcolmMalcolm Macdonald 26
1978–79 Div 1 42 17 14 11 61 48 48 7th W R2 &
UEFA Cup R3 Stapleton, FrankFrank Stapleton 28
1979–80 Div 1 42 18 16 8 52 36 52 4th RU QF RU Cup Winners' Cup RU Sunderland, AlanAlan Sunderland 29
1980–81 Div 1 42 19 15 8 61 45 53 3rd R3 R4 &
&
&
Stapleton, FrankFrank Stapleton 16
1981–82 Div 1[q] 42 20 11 11 48 37 71 4th R3 R4 &
UEFA Cup R2 Sunderland, AlanAlan Sunderland 12
1982–83 Div 1 42 16 10 16 58 56 58 10th SF SF &
UEFA Cup R1 Woodcock, TonyTony Woodcock 21
1983–84 Div 1 42 18 9 15 74 60 63 6th R3 R4 &
&
&
Woodcock, TonyTony Woodcock 23
1984–85 Div 1 42 19 9 14 61 49 66 7th R4 R3 &
&
&
Woodcock, TonyTony Woodcock 13
1985–86 Div 1 42 20 9 13 49 47 69 7th R5 QF &
&
&
Nicholas, CharlieCharlie Nicholas 18
1986–87 Div 1 42 20 10 12 58 35 70 4th QF W &
&
&
Hayes, MartinMartin Hayes 24
1987–88 Div 1 40 18 12 10 58 39 66 6th QF RU &
&
&
Smith, AlanAlan Smith 16
1988–89 Div 1 38 22 10 6 73 36 76 1st R3 R3 &
Mercantile Credit Centenary Trophy W Smith, AlanAlan Smith 25 ♦
1989–90 Div 1 38 18 8 12 54 38 62 4th R4 R4 RU &
&
Smith, AlanAlan Smith 13
1990–91 Div 1 38 24 13 1 74 18 83[r] 1st SF R4 &
&
&
Smith, AlanAlan Smith 27 ♦
1991–92 Div 1 42 19 15 8 81 46 72 4th R3 R3 W European Cup R2 Wright, IanIan Wright 26[s]
1992–93 Prem 42 15 11 16 40 38 56 10th W W &
&
&
Wright, IanIan Wright 30
1993–94 Prem 42 18 17 7 53 28 71 4th R4 R4 RU Cup Winners' Cup W Wright, IanIan Wright 35
1994–95 Prem 42 13 12 17 52 49 51 12th R3 QF &
Cup Winners' Cup

RU

Wright, IanIan Wright 30
1995–96 Prem 38 17 12 9 49 32 63 5th R3 SF &
&
&
Wright, IanIan Wright 22
1996–97 Prem 38 19 11 8 62 32 68 3rd R4 R4 &
UEFA Cup R1 Wright, IanIan Wright 30
1997–98 Prem 38 23 9 6 68 33 78 1st W SF &
UEFA Cup R1 Bergkamp, DennisDennis Bergkamp 22
1998–99 Prem 38 22 12 4 59 17 78 2nd SF R4 W Champions League Group Anelka, NicolasNicolas Anelka 19
1999–2000 Prem 38 22 7 9 73 43 73 2nd R4 R4 W Champions League

Group

RU
Henry, ThierryThierry Henry 26
2000–01 Prem 38 20 10 8 63 38 70 2nd RU R3 &
Champions League QF Henry, ThierryThierry Henry 22
2001–02 Prem 38 26 9 3 79 36 87 1st W QF &
Champions League GS2 Henry, ThierryThierry Henry 32 ♦
2002–03 Prem 38 23 9 6 85 42 78 2nd W R3 W Champions League GS2 Henry, ThierryThierry Henry 32
2003–04 Prem 38 26 12 0 73 26 90 1st SF SF RU Champions League QF Henry, ThierryThierry Henry 39[u]
2004–05 Prem 38 25 8 5 87 36 83 2nd W QF W Champions League R16 Henry, ThierryThierry Henry 30[v]
2005–06 Prem 38 20 7 11 68 31 67 4th R4 SF RU Champions League RU Henry, ThierryThierry Henry 33 ♦
2006–07 Prem 38 19 11 8 63 35 68 4th R5 RU &
Champions League R16 van Persie, RobinRobin van Persie 13
2007–08 Prem 38 24 11 3 74 31 83 3rd R5 SF &
Champions League QF Adebayor, EmmanuelEmmanuel Adebayor 30
2008–09 Prem 38 20 12 6 68 37 72 4th SF QF &
Champions League SF van Persie, RobinRobin van Persie 20
2009–10 Prem 38 23 6 9 83 41 75 3rd R4 QF &
Champions League QF Fàbregas, CescCesc Fàbregas 19
2010–11 Prem 38 19 11 8 72 43 68 4th QF RU &
Champions League R16 van Persie, RobinRobin van Persie 22
2011–12 Prem 38 21 7 10 74 49 70 3rd R5 QF &
Champions League R16 van Persie, RobinRobin van Persie 37 ♦
2012–13 Prem 38 21 10 7 72 37 73 4th R5 QF &
Champions League R16 Walcott, TheoTheo Walcott 21
2013–14 Prem 38 24 7 7 68 41 79 4th W R4 &
Champions League R16 Giroud, OlivierOlivier Giroud 22
2014–15 Prem 38 22 9 7 71 36 75 3rd W R3 W Champions League R16 Sánchez, AlexisAlexis Sánchez 25
2015–16 Prem 38 20 11 7 65 36 71 2nd QF R3 W Champions League R16 Giroud, OlivierOlivier Giroud 24

Footnotes

  1. ^ A club located in the southern counties of England. Initially these were amateur clubs, as professionalism in football was not as readily accepted in the south as in the north. In the 1893–94 season, Arsenal (under its former name Woolwich Arsenal) turned professional and became the first southern club admitted to the northern-oriented Football League. The following year saw the creation of the Southern Football League, which was composed of amateur and professional teams. By the 1920–21 season, the top division of the Southern Football League was absorbed by the Football League, to create its third division.[2][3]
  2. ^ Contrary to what was stated at the time, clubs from Southern England did not boycott Arsenal following their move to professional football, nor were the club expelled from the London or Kent FA.[13]
  3. ^ Despite their status as champions in 1989, Arsenal were barred from participating in the 1989–90 European Cup as UEFA's ban on English teams from playing in European club competitions was in effect.[33] The embargo which began in 1985 as a consequence of Liverpool's role in the Heysel tragedy, was not lifted until April 1990.[34]
  4. ^ The expansion of the FA Cup, from 15 clubs in its inaugural season to currently more than 700 has meant successive changes in the competition's structure. Teams in the top two divisions were made exempt from the qualifying stages and the first two rounds of the Cup in 1925–26. Because of this rounds were renamed; the fifth and sixth qualifying rounds became first and second round proper. Since 1914–15 there have been a total of 14 rounds, in comparison to five in 1871–72.
  5. ^ Other competitions refer to the London Senior Cup, Kent Senior Cup, London Challenge Cup, London Charity Cup and the Mercantile Credit Centenary Trophy. London Challenge Cup results are sourced to Kelly's first team line-ups (until the 1929–30 season) and Ollier (1995) thereafter. All other results, including the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup which was not administered by UEFA, are sourced to Kelly.
  6. ^ Includes goals scored in the Football League, Premier League, League Cup, FA Cup and Charity/Community Shield. The Inter-Cities Fairs Cup and European competitions organised by UEFA are also included, as are several now-defunct leagues and cup competitions: the United League, London League Premier Division, Southern District Combination, London Senior Cup, London Challenge Cup, Kent Senior Cup, London Charity Cup, Southern Floodlight Challenge Cup and commemorative Mercantile Credit Centenary Trophy. Goals scored are sourced from Ollier (1995) until the 1993–94 season, and Kelly's first team line-ups before and thereafter.
  7. ^ The club was a founding member of the United League in 1896. The league lasted for three seasons before it disbanded.[59]
  8. ^ Arsenal finished with exactly the same league record as Blackburn Rovers.[60]
  9. ^ Although they had finished outside the automatic promotion places in 1914–15, Arsenal were re-elected to the First Division after it expanded in 1919.[61] According to Bernard Joy, Arsenal secured eighteen votes to Tottenham Hotspur's eight.[6] However it has been alleged that Arsenal's promotion, on historical grounds rather than merit, was thanks to underhand actions by Norris, who was chairman of the club at the time; see History of Arsenal F.C. (1886–1966) for further details. These allegations range from political machinations to outright bribery; no firm proof of any wrongdoing has ever been found.
  10. ^ Arsenal were originally awarded sixth place due to an error calculating goal average, which was not corrected until 1975.[62]
  11. ^ No competitive football was played between 1915 and 1919 due to the First World War. Arsenal competed in the London Combination from 1915–16 to 1918–19.[63][64]
  12. ^ In September 1939 first-class football was suspended due to the Second World War, with the 1939–40 league table voided and regional competitions contested instead.[65]
  13. ^ The FA Cup resumed in 1945, but league football remained regionally structured until the start of the 1946–47 season.[66]
  14. ^ Arsenal were not invited to take part in the 1950 FA Charity Shield despite winning the FA Cup, as the match was held between the England national football team that competed in the 1950 FIFA World Cup and the FA squad that participated in an exhibition tour of Canada during the same summer.[67]
  15. ^ For the first six seasons of the Football League Cup, Arsenal declined to take part as its board preferred the London-centric Floodlit Cup (which became defunct once the new competition was introduced), and were against the League Cup acting as "an interim step towards league re-organisation."[68] Arsenal eventually joined in the 1966–67 season for reasons unspecified; by the 1971–72 season it became mandatory for all Football League clubs to participate.[69]
  16. ^ Arsenal did not participate in the 1971 FA Charity Shield due to a previously arranged pre-season tour that clashed with the event.[70] Leicester City were invited to take part, and beat Cup runners-up Liverpool.[71]
  17. ^ This season saw the introduction of three points for a win instead of two.[72]
  18. ^ Arsenal were deducted two points for their part in a brawl with Manchester United on 20 October 1990.[73]
  19. ^ Ian Wright scored 29 goals in the First Division, five of which for Crystal Palace before his move to Arsenal in September 1991.[74]
  20. ^ Arsenal originally entered the 1999–2000 UEFA Champions League, but only came third in the group stage and were knocked out; however, they were granted a consolatory place in the UEFA Cup under the rules of the tournament at the time.[75]
  21. ^ Thierry Henry was the division's top goalscorer with 30 goals, winning the European Golden Shoe in the process.[76]
  22. ^ Joint holder of the European Golden Shoe with Diego Forlán, both of whom scored 25 goals.[77]

References

General

  • Dobson, Stephen; Goddard, Jeff (2001). The Economics of Football. London: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-51714-1. 
  • Harris, Jeff & Hogg, Tony (ed.) (1995). Arsenal Who's Who. London: Independent UK Sports. ISBN 1-899429-03-4. 
  • Joy, Bernard (1952). Forward, Arsenal!. London: GCR Books Limited. ISBN 0-9559211-1-2. 
  • Kelly, Andrew. "Arsenal first team line-ups". The Arsenal History. Retrieved 26 September 2016. 
  • King, Anthony (2002). The end of the terraces: the transformation of English football in the 1990s. London: Continuum International Publishing Group. ISBN 0-7185-0259-0. 
  • Motson, John (2005). Motson's FA Cup Odyssey: The World's Greatest Knockout Competition. London: Robson. ISBN 1-86105-903-5. 
  • Ollier, Fred (1995). Arsenal: A Complete Record. London: Breedon Books. ISBN 1-85983-011-0. 
  • Palmer, Myles (2007). The Professor: Arsène Wenger. London: Virgin Books. ISBN 0-7535-1097-9. 
  • Rundle, Richard. "Arsenal". Football Club History Database. Retrieved 27 February 2006. 
  • Scott, Les (2008). End to End Stuff. London: Random House. ISBN 0-593-06068-7. 
  • Soar, Phil; Tyler, Martin (1986). Arsenal 1886–1986: The Official Centenary History of Arsenal Football Club. Hamlyn. ISBN 0-600-35871-2. 
  • Soar, Phil; Tyler, Martin (2005). The Official Illustrated History of Arsenal. London: Hamlyn. ISBN 0-600-61344-5. 
  • Soar, Phil; Tyler, Martin (2011). Arsenal 125 Years in the Making: The Official Illustrated History 1886–2011. Hamlyn. ISBN 978-0-600-62353-3. 

Specific

  1. ^ Soar & Tyler (2011), p. 24.
  2. ^ Tomlinson, Alan (2010). A Dictionary of Sports Studies. Oxford University Press. p. 196. ISBN 0-19-921381-X. 
  3. ^ Freeman, Nicholas (2011). 1895: Drama, Disaster and Disgrace in Late Victorian Britain. Edinburgh University Press. p. 39. ISBN 0-7486-4056-8. 
  4. ^ Joy (1952), p. 9.
  5. ^ Joy (1952), p. 32.
  6. ^ a b Joy (1952), p. 28.
  7. ^ Ross, James; Heneghan, Michael; Orford, Stuart; Culliton, Eoin (23 June 2016). "English Clubs Divisional Movements 1888-2016". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 5 August 2016. Retrieved 5 August 2016. 
  8. ^ "Match Pack: Arsenal v Villa". Aston Villa F.C. 26 December 2009. Retrieved 25 July 2016. 
  9. ^ "Arsenal – Complete cup finals". Statto Organisation. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  10. ^ Sanghera, Mandeep (16 September 2015). "Dinamo Zagreb 2–1 Arsenal". BBC Sport. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  11. ^ Ley, John (5 December 2007). "Wenger calls for reality check at Arsenal". The Daily Telegraph. London. Retrieved 25 July 2016. 
  12. ^ a b c d "125 years of Arsenal history – 1891–1896". Arsenal F.C. 5 December 2011. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  13. ^ Kelly, Andy. "What really happened when Arsenal turned professional". The Arsenal History. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  14. ^ Atwood, Tony (20 February 2014). "Arsenal's great pre-Highbury rivals". Arsenal F.C. Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  15. ^ a b Soar & Tyler (2005), p. 33.
  16. ^ "125 years of Arsenal history – 1911–16". Arsenal F.C. 25 October 2011. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  17. ^ "Arsenal Annual Report 2004/2005" (PDF). Arsenal F.C. 2005. Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  18. ^ "Norris negotiates top-flight return". Arsenal F.C. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  19. ^ Soar & Tyler (2005), p. 45.
  20. ^ "GGM 36: Arsenal win their first major trophy". Arsenal F.C. 8 August 2007. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  21. ^ "Herbert Chapman – Overview". Arsenal F.C. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  22. ^ Wallace, Sam (18 September 2011). "In football's long, cyclical game Arsenal's present lack of success is scarcely a drop in the ocean". The Independent. London. Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  23. ^ "The managers". Arsenal F.C. 30 June 2008. Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  24. ^ "Arsenal win the Fairs Cup in 1970". Arsenal F.C. 14 July 2007. Retrieved 25 July 2016. 
  25. ^ "From Fairs Cup via UEFA Cup to UEFA Europa League". UEFA. 6 June 2011. Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  26. ^ "125 years of Arsenal history – 1970–1971". Arsenal F.C. 16 February 2012. Retrieved 25 July 2016. 
  27. ^ "'The Five Minute Final' stuns Manchester Utd". Arsenal F.C. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 25 July 2016. 
  28. ^ "125 years of Arsenal history – 1976–1980". Arsenal F.C. 1 October 2012. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  29. ^ "Arsenal's League Cup Finals – A history". Arsenal F.C. 26 January 2011. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  30. ^ "Thomas strike seals title at Anfield". Arsenal F.C. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  31. ^ "125 years of Arsenal history – 1986–1990". Arsenal F.C. 21 March 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  32. ^ "Graham's Gunners clinch league title". Arsenal F.C. 8 July 2007. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  33. ^ Delaney, Miguel (21 June 2013). "What if ... England hadn't been banned from Europe". ESPN FC. Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  34. ^ Ball, Peter (20 April 1990). "Liverpool receive lift for Europe return". The Times. p. 44. 
  35. ^ Jones, Stuart (7 November 1991). "Arsenal outclassed in extra time". The Times. p. 40. 
  36. ^ Conn, David (12 September 2007). "How Dein's 'dead money' helped kill off a football ideal". theguardian.com. Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  37. ^ Ball, Peter (17 August 1991). "First division clubs pull out of the Football League". The Times. p. 1. 
  38. ^ "The history of the FA". The Football Association. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  39. ^ Langford, Adrian; Hunt, Richard (14 December 1992). "How Sky scored an own goal". The Guardian. London. p. A13. 
  40. ^ "Arsenal – 1992–93". Statto Organisation. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  41. ^ "Gunners clinch FA and League Cup double". Arsenal F.C. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 20 July 2016. 
  42. ^ "GGM 20: Gunners stun Parma in Copenhagen". Arsenal F.C. 23 August 2007. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  43. ^ "1994–95: Nayim's bolt from the blue sinks Arsenal". UEFA. 1 June 1995. Archived from the original on 22 August 2010. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  44. ^ "Double top Gunners". BBC Sport. 9 July 2002. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  45. ^ "Arsenal's 'Invincibles' voted greatest Premier League team". BBC Sport. 15 May 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  46. ^ "'The Invincibles' go 49 games unbeaten". Arsenal F.C. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  47. ^ "Arsenal play in European Cup Final". Arsenal F.C. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  48. ^ Fynn, Alex; Whitcher, Kevin (31 August 2008). "Young guns". The Observer. London. Retrieved 3 January 2016. 
  49. ^ Ornstein, David (20 February 2012). "Arsene Wenger at lowest point as Arsenal boss – Emmanuel Petit". BBC Sport. Retrieved 25 July 2016. 
  50. ^ Wilson, Bill (21 September 2011). "Arsenal aim to be financial role models". BBC News. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 
  51. ^ Ronay, Barney (13 May 2012). "Arsenal secure Champions League place with victory at West Brom". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 25 July 2016. 
  52. ^ "Arsene Wenger: Keep FA Cup replays, says Arsenal manager". BBC Sport. 19 February 2016. Retrieved 25 July 2016. 
  53. ^ Northcroft, Jonathan (31 May 2015). "Arsenal 4 Aston Villa 0: Gunners' star quality leaves Villa flailing". The Sunday Times. Retrieved 25 July 2016.  (subscription required)
  54. ^ Ross, James M.; Ross (9 June 2016). "English League Leading Goalscorers". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 2 October 2016. 
  55. ^ "The FA Cup Past Results". The Football Association. Retrieved 2 September 2016.  Individual seasons accessed via dropdown menu.
  56. ^ a b All results are sourced to Kelly's first team line-ups.
  57. ^ For Arsenal results and final league tables in the Football League, Premier League, United League, Southern District Combination, London League Premier Division, and the abandoned 1939–40 season please refer to Kelly's first team line-ups website, listed in the general section.
  58. ^ "Arsenal". UEFA. 2 September 2016. 
  59. ^ Attwood, Tony (7 September 2013). "Arsenal in the United League, and the unsavoury end to the southern District Combination". The History of Arsenal (AISA Arsenal History Society). Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  60. ^ Scott (2008), p. 223.
  61. ^ Kelly, Andy; Andrews, Mark (7 January 2015). "Arsenal elected to the First Division – 10 March 1919". The Arsenal History. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  62. ^ Soar & Tyler (1986), p. 42.
  63. ^ "125 years of Arsenal history – 1911–1916". Arsenal F.C. 25 October 2011. Retrieved 7 November 2011. 
  64. ^ "125 years of Arsenal history – 1915–1920". Arsenal F.C. 25 October 2011. Retrieved 7 November 2011. 
  65. ^ "Arsenal at War". Arsenal F.C. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 15 November 2011. 
  66. ^ Scott (2008), p. 226.
  67. ^ "Ask Albert – Number 39". BBC Sport. 2 November 2001. Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  68. ^ Attwood, Tony (6 April 2015). "Arsenal in the Southern Floodlight Challenge Cup (Southern Professional Floodlit Cup)". The History of Arsenal (AISA Arsenal History Society). Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  69. ^ Dobson & Goddard (2001), p. 142.
  70. ^ "FA in search of substitute". The Times. 25 May 1971. p. 8. 
  71. ^ Moore, Brian (9 August 1971). "Leicester's win suggests season of achievement". The Times. p. 8. 
  72. ^ Murray, Scott; Ingle, Sean (21 February 2001). "Whatever happened to Third Lanark?". theguardian.com. Retrieved 31 July 2016. 
  73. ^ Taylor, Louise (23 October 1990). "FA charges clubs after the brawl at Old Trafford". The Times. p. 48. 
  74. ^ Silver, Neil (17 March 1996). "I'm all Wright". Sunday Mirror. London. Retrieved 15 November 2011. He had scored 29 goals in total, 24 of them counting for Arsenal after his move from Crystal Palace. 
  75. ^ Palmer (2007), p. 194.
  76. ^ "Henry ready to celebrate". UEFA. 24 May 2004. Retrieved 8 November 2011. 
  77. ^ "Henry and Forlan win Golden Shoe". BBC Sport. 30 May 2005. Retrieved 8 November 2011. 

External links

  • The History of Arsenal Football Club – 1886 to 1992 at Arseweb.com
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