Leo Buscaglia

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Leo Buscaglia
Born (1924-03-31)March 31, 1924
Los Angeles, California, United States
Died June 12, 1998(1998-06-12) (aged 74)
Glenbrook, Nevada, United States
Occupation Motivational speaker, writer, professor
Alma mater University of Southern California

Felice Leonardo "Leo" Buscaglia PhD (March 31, 1924 – June 12, 1998), also known as "Dr. Love," was an American author and motivational speaker, and a professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Southern California.[1][2]

Biography

Felice Leonardo Buscaglia was born in Los Angeles, California on March 31, 1924 into a family of Italian immigrants.[1] He spent his early childhood in Aosta, Italy, before going back to the United States for education.[1] He was a graduate of Theodore Roosevelt High School. Buscaglia served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Using G.I. Bill benefits, Buscaglia entered the University of Southern California, where he earned three degrees (BA 1950; MA 1954; PhD 1963) before eventually joining the faculty.[1] Upon retirement, Buscaglia was named Professor at Large, one of only two such designations on campus at that time.

A student's suicide

While teaching at USC, Buscaglia was moved by a student's suicide to contemplate human disconnectedness and the meaning of life, and began a non-credit class he called Love 1A.[1] This became the basis for his first book, titled simply Love. His dynamic speaking style was discovered by the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) and his televised lectures earned great popularity in the 1980s. At one point his talks, always shown during fund raising periods, were the top earners of all PBS programs. This national exposure, coupled with the heartfelt storytelling style of his books, helped make all of his titles national Best Sellers; five were once on the New York Times Best Sellers List simultaneously.[2]

Death

Buscaglia died of a heart attack on June 12, 1998 at his home in Glenbrook, Nevada, near Lake Tahoe, he was 74.[1]

Bibliography

  1. Love (1972)
  2. The Way of the Bull (1973)
  3. The Fall of Freddie the Leaf (1982)
  4. Living, Loving and Learning (1982)
  5. Loving Each Other (1984)
  6. Amar a los demás (1985)
  7. Personhood (1986)
  8. Bus 9 to Paradise (1987)
  9. Papa My Father (1989)
  10. Because I Am Human (1972)
  11. The Disabled and Their Parents: A Counseling Challenge (1983)
  12. Seven Stories of Christmas Love (1987)
  13. A Memory for Tino (1988)
  14. Born for Love (1992)

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Robert McG. Thomas Jr (June 13, 1998). "Leo Buscaglia, TV Advocate of Love's Power, Dies at 74". The New York Times. 
  2. ^ a b Burt A. Folkart (June 13, 1998). "Leo Buscaglia; Speaker and Writer on Love and Hugs". Los Angeles Times. 

External links

  • Leo Buscaglia and Felice Foundation official site
  • Selected Moments of the 20th Century: 1969 Leo Buscaglia teaches Love 1A at the University of Southern California
  • Buscaglia at The "My Hero" Project
  • Interview & "Love Quiz"
  • "Learn the Joy of the Moment" by Leo Buscaglia, PhD
  • "Loving Through Death" by Leo Buscaglia, PhD
  • Obituary at USC Alumni News
  • DVDs of Leo Buscaglia Public Television programs with Leo Buscaglia available
  • Gocomics.com A Peanuts comic strip reference to Leo Buscaglia's popularity in the 1980s
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