Lausanne School

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The Lausanne School of economics, sometimes referred to as the Mathematical School, refers to the neoclassical economics school of thought surrounding Léon Walras and Vilfredo Pareto. It is named after the University of Lausanne, at which both Walras and Pareto held professorships. The central feature of the Lausanne School was its development of general equilibrium theory. Polish economist Leon Winiarski is also said to have been a member of the Lausanne School.[1]

References

  1. ^ Garrouste, Pierre and Ioannides, Stavros. (2001). Evolution and Path Dependence in Economic Ideas (Lausanne school: Winiarski a member, pg. 184). Edward Elgar Publishing.

Further reading

  • Gherity, James A. (1965). Economic Thought: a Historical Anthology (article: The Lausanne School, pg. 352-). Ransom House.

External links

  • The Lausanne School ("Walrasians")


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