Kyoto Institute of Technology

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Kyoto Institute of Technology
京都工芸繊維大学
Mark of Kyoto Institute of Technology.png
Type Public (national)
Established Founded 1949,
Chartered 1899
Location Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan
Nickname Kosen
Website www.kit.ac.jp

Kyoto Institute of Technology (京都工芸繊維大学, Kyōto Kōgei Sen'i Daigaku) in Kyoto, Japan is a Japanese national university established in 1949. The Institute's history extends back to two schools, Kyoto Craft High School (established in 1902 at Sakyo-ku, Yoshida) and Kyoto Sericulture Training School (established in 1899 at Kita-ku, Daishogun, under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce), which were forerunners of the Faculty of Engineering and Design and the Faculty of Textile Science, respectively. The former was moved to Sakyo-ku, Matsugasaki in 1930 and changed its name to Kyoto Industrial High School in 1944. The latter developed into Kyoto Sericulture High School, under supervision of the Ministry of Education in 1914, and changed its name to Kyoto Sericulture Technical High School in 1931 and then to Kyoto Technical High School of Sericulture in 1944. The two forerunners merged in 1949, due to educational system revisions, to establish the present School of Science and Technology. Together with Shinshu University and Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, the Institute is one of Japan's three historical centers of textile research.

Kyoto Institute of Technology has a campus at Matsugasaki in Sakyō-ku. Another campus is at Saga in Ukyō-ku. Its Japanese nickname is Kōsen (工繊). In English it is known as KIT.

Beginning in October 2007, graduate course instruction became available in English through the International Program for Science and Technology for specially selected students from the 50 institutions worldwide with KIT Exchange Agreements.

Statistics

2,968 undergraduates (23% women) and 1110 graduate students (23% women), 170 of whom are international students from 30 countries, comprised the student body as of May 1, 2011. From 2008 to 2009, 330 KIT researchers traveled abroad and 175 researchers came to KIT from abroad.[1]

Programs

Undergraduate programs

  • Applied Biology
  • Biomolecular Engineering
  • Macromolecular Science and Engineering
  • Chemistry and Materials Technology
  • Electronics
  • Information Science
  • Mechanical and System Engineering
  • Design Engineering and Management
  • Architecture and Design
  • Integrated Science and Technology (evening programs in Bioscience, Nanomaterial Science, Mechatronics Technology and Information Design Technology)

The university graduate school, established in 1988, awards master's and doctoral degrees in science and technology.

Master's programs

  • Applied Biology
  • Biomolecular Engineering
  • Macromolecular Science and Engineering
  • Chemistry and Materials Technology
  • Electronics
  • Information Science
  • Mechanical and Systems Engineering
  • Design Engineering and Management
  • Architecture and Design
  • Design
  • Architectural Engineering
  • Advanced Fibro-Science

Doctoral programs

  • Materials and Life Science
  • Engineering Design
  • Design Science
  • Advanced Fibro-Science
  • Biobased Materials Science

Centers and campus facilities

The Building No.3 built in 1930
Saga Campus (Center for Bioresource Field Science)
  • Cooperative Research Center
  • Drosophila Genetic Resource Center
  • Center for Instrumental Analysis
  • Center for Environmental Science
  • Center for Information Science
  • Radioisotope Laboratory
  • Venture Laboratory
  • Incubation Center
  • Center for Fiber and Textile Science
  • Center for Bioresource Field Science
  • Center for Manufacturing Technology
  • International Exchange Center
  • Health Care Service Center
  • Center Hall
  • University Library
  • Museum and Archives
  • Sustainable Design Education Research Center

In 2006, 28 patents were attributed to Kyoto Institute of Technology.

Notable KIT graduates and professors

  • Asai Chu (1856–1907) Artist[2][3][4]
  • Motono, Seigo 1882–1944 (architect, professor) [5]
  • Sei-ichi Shiraiphotos of work (1905–1983) Architect, KIT graduate[6][7]
  • Kimura, Kosuke [8] (professor emeritus, former president)
  • Nakamura, Masao [9] (professor emeritus, architect and researcher of tea houses and sukiya-style construction)
  • Takeda, Goichi [10] 1872–1938
  • Yoshitake, Touri [11] 1886–1945 (alumni and architect, designer of the Diet Yokohama Customs Buildings)
  • Matsukuma, Hiroshi [12] (History and Philosophy of Architecture, Public Space Planner)
  • Jinnai, Hiroshi (professor),[13][14]
  • Kishi, Waro [15] (born 1950) (professor emeritus, architect)
  • Kimura, Hiroaki [16] (born 1952)(professor, architect)
  • Kojima, Kazuhiro [17] (1958 – professor, architect)
  • Yoneda, Akira [18] (born 1959)(professor, architect)
  • Kidosaki, Nagisa [19] (born 1960)(professor, architect)
  • Nagasaka, Dai [20](born 1960)(professor, architect)
  • Sakamoto, Chikao (1911–1998) alumni and former director of Hokkaido and Okinawa Development Bureaux
  • Ono, Shinji (1947–1967)former governor of Wakayama Prefecture
  • Matsui, Takaji (1956) – alumni, Biologist at Kyoto Municipal Zoo, Japan Center for Amphibians and Reptiles
  • Sato, Sanpei [21]- (born 1929) Cartoonist and Political Satirist of Fujisan Taro (Asahi Shinbun, 1965) fame
  • Mishima, Hisanori [22](alumni, architect and urban planner)
  • Kita, Chikara [23](alumni and architect)
  • Itoh, Sekisui [24] (born 1914)(alumni, ceramic artist and living national treasure)
  • Kurosaki, Akira [25](born 1937) (alumni, woodblock artist)
  • Yama, Rokuro [26](1897–1982)

References

  1. ^ Facts and Figures (PDF), Kyoto Institute of Technology 
  2. ^ "TokyoArtBeat - 検索". tokyoartbeat.com. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  3. ^ "Asai Chu | biography - Japanese painter | Encyclopædia Britannica". britannica.com. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  4. ^ "Chu Asai Auction Results - Chu Asai on artnet". artnet.com. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  5. ^ http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/110004659876/en A STUDY ON WORKS, ACTIVITIES AND ARCHITECTURAL IDEAS OF SEIGO MOTONO IN 'THE INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURAL ASSOCIATION OF JAPAN' [in Japanese] Retrieved 2011-06-24.
  6. ^ http://eng.archinform.net/arch/15534.htm Retrieved 2011-06-30 (Noa Building in the Azabudai area of Tokyo, 1974, by Seiichi Shirai.
  7. ^ http://rempei.web.infoseek.co.jp/photo/kiji/011zensyoji.html Retrieved 2011-06-30.
  8. ^ "京都工芸繊維大学創立60周年記念館 | Ks Architects". ks-architects.com. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  9. ^ "「中村昌生」の検索結果 - Yahoo!検索(画像)". image.search.yahoo.co.jp. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  10. ^ "Goichi Takeda" (PDF). 15 February 2007. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  11. ^ Watanabe, H. (2001). The Architecture of Tokyo: An Architectural History in 571 Individual Presentations. Edition Axel Menges. p. 110. ISBN 9783930698936. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  12. ^ "The Japan Times - News on Japan, Business News, Opinion, Sports, Entertainment and More". search.japantimes.co.jp. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  13. ^ "DPI - Dutch Polymer Institute - Events archive". Archived from the original on 2011-10-03. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  14. ^ "Dear users of our former global web site | JEOL Ltd". jeol.com. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  15. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-26. Retrieved 2011-06-17. 
  16. ^ "Ks Architects". ks-architects.com. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  17. ^ "architectural grammar: Space Block Hanoi by Kazuhiro Kojima". architecturalgrammar.blogspot.com. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  18. ^ "Hojo House by Akira Yoneda / Architecton". infoteli.com. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  19. ^ "House in Yoyogi-Uehara - WHAT WE DO IS SECRET". whatwedoissecret.org. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  20. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-05-20. Retrieved 2011-06-17. 
  21. ^ "サトウサンペイの「ジーの思い出し笑い」". d.hatena.ne.jp. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  22. ^ "GK Report" (PDF). 13 June 2014. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  23. ^ "World Buildings Directory - Fukuyama City Central Library". Archived from the original on 2011-10-06. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  24. ^ "nihon-kogeikai.com". nihon-kogeikai.com. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  25. ^ "The Gilbert Luber Collection: Akira Kurosaki". lubergallery.typepad.com. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  26. ^ ":Rokuro Yama:". kasho.org. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 

External links

  • Official website (in English)
  • Centers and Campus Facilities

Coordinates: 35°01′27″N 135°43′29″E / 35.02417°N 135.72472°E / 35.02417; 135.72472

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