Kiama railway station

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Kiama
NSW TrainLink intercity train station
Kiama Station
Location Railway Parade, Kiama
New South Wales
Australia
Coordinates 34°40′20″S 150°51′17″E / 34.6723°S 150.8548°E / -34.6723; 150.8548Coordinates: 34°40′20″S 150°51′17″E / 34.6723°S 150.8548°E / -34.6723; 150.8548
Owned by RailCorp
Operated by NSW TrainLink
Line(s) South Coast
Distance 119.160 km from Central[1]
Platforms 2 (island), 194 and 196 metres[1]
Train operators NSW TrainLink
Bus operators
Construction
Structure type At-grade
Parking 40 spaces[2]
Bicycle facilities Yes
Disabled access Easy Access
Other information
Website Transport for NSW
History
Opened 2 June 1893[3]
Electrified 17 November 2001
Traffic
Passengers (2013) 500 (daily)[4] (Sydney Trains, NSW TrainLink)
Rank 187
Services
Preceding station   NSW TrainLink   Following station
South Coast Line
towards Bomaderry

Kiama is an intercity train station located in Kiama, New South Wales, Australia, on the South Coast railway line. The station serves NSW TrainLink diesel multiple unit trains travelling south to Bomaderry and electric multiple unit trains north to Wollongong and Sydney. Early morning and late night services to and from stations to the south are provided by train replacement bus services.[5] It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.[6][7]

History

As a seaside town, Kiama was initially reliant on coastal shipping for its links to Wollongong and Sydney. The railway first arrived in the Kiama district in November 1887, with the opening of a new station at North Kiama (since renamed Bombo), on the town's northern outskirts.[8] The terminus was only a temporary arrangement, however: the NSW Government Railways had already signed contracts to further extend the railway south the previous year. Kiama was the northernmost station on that extension, built by firm of W. Monie & J. Angus between 1886 and 1893.[9] The new station opened in June 1893.[7]

Kiama was built as a passenger station and combined signal box on an island platform in the centre of the town. The goods yard was also opened and a locomotive sub-depot south of the station. From the timber footbridge, an elaborate landing and covered stair led down to the platform and the brick station was the first example of its type, the design of which was used at many stations built over the next 30 years. The design of the footbridge and stairs (plans dated 1892) were signed by Henry Deane. The line remains a single track with a crossing loop at the station.[6]

The Kiama Railway Station yard was originally huge, extending from Terralong Street at the north end to Barney Street to the south. NSW Railways plans dated 1925 for "Station Arrangements" show (from north to south): a cottage south of Terralong Street; platform extensions and removal of a lamp room from the platform; retaining walls; a cream loading platform on the east side of the yard, east of the platform; tanks under the Bong Bong Street overbridge and a rest house southeast of the overbridge; a cattle yards and weighbridge southeast of the overbridge; and further south, stock yards and an engine shed and turntable (west of rail lines); a goods shed with platform and loading stage, and east of these, another rest house. At the far southern end of the yard, on the south-eastern side, was the Station Master's residence and the Dairy Farmers Co-operative Milk Company building (just north of the Barney Street overbridge).[6]

Structures that have since disappeared include the footbridge and stairs, the Station Master's residence, the Bong Bong Street overbridge, the goods shed and the engine shed. A Dairy Farmers Co-Op siding and a N.S.W. Produce Company siding opened in 1947 are also no longer used. Ash pits are shown in the 1925 plan of the station arrangements, north of the turntable: one within the (no longer extant) engine shed and one north of the engine shed.[6]

Electric trains began operating on the line from Dapto to Kiama in November 2001,[10] but the line to the south has remained as non-electrified single track. Since 2001, northbound trains from Bomaderry terminate at Kiama, requiring passengers to change to electric multiple unit services heading north. In 2005, the then Minister for Transport, John Watkins, announced that electrification would be extended to the terminus at Bomaderry at an unspecified future date, but the proposal did not progress.[11]

Kiama Station was upgraded to be wheelchair-accessible in 2005, with a lift to the platform completed with a concrete footbridge link to Eddy Street and concrete stairs.[7][6] In 2014, electronic ticketing in the form of the Opal smart card became available at the station.[12]

Platforms & services

Kiama has one island platform with two faces. It is serviced by NSW TrainLink South Coast line electric services from Sydney and diesel multiple unit services from Bomaderry.[5]

Platform Line Stopping pattern Notes
1 services to Sydney Central & Bondi Junction [5]
2 services to Bomaderry occasional services to Sydney Central & Bondi Junction[5]

Transport links

Premier Illawarra operates one route via Kiama station:

Kiama Coaches operate two routes via Kiama Station:

Description

The station complex includes the platform building and island platform (1893), turntable (1897), Bong Bong Street overbridge (c. 1990}} and footbridge (2005).[6]

Platform building (1893)

This is a single storey painted brick building (painted in heritage colours: brick colour for walls; drab for stucco reveals to windows and doors; manilla for window frames and doors) with a gabled corrugated steel roof with timber tongue & grooved boarding to gable ends. The building has timber framed double hung windows with 9 paned top sashes with coloured glass panes to top sashes and frosted glass to bottom sashes. The majority of doors are timber panelled, and there are some timber panelled double doors, all with multipaned fanlights (some fanlights covered over). Door and window openings have elaborate sandstone reveals and triangular pediments. The awnings on both sides of the building have corrugated steel skillion roofs and elaborate decorative steel awning brackets, mounted on sandstone wall brackets.[6]

There is a small weatherboard addition to the south end of the main platform building which has 4 early stop chamfered timber posts at each corner, indicating that this is a weatherboard infill structure within an originally open awning structure. There are modern security screens to windows, and some modern timber flush doors. There is a brick screen wall to the north end of building to screen the entry to men's toilets.[6]

Internally, the waiting area has modern floor tiling, and modern ticket windows, timber panelled double doors both sides with frosted glass 8 paned fanlights, a later ceiling with timber battens, and later timber veneer panelling to around 2m height internally to the waiting room. Offices also have later ceilings and later timber veneer panelling to around 2m height (indicating possible presence of rising damp).[6]

Platform (1893)

The island platform generally has a concrete face but its face is open at the northern end. The platform surface is asphalt.[6]

Turntable (1897) and ash pits

A 60 foot turntable located southeast of the southern end of Eddy Street. The turntable is a sunken circular brick edged structure with a single rail on timber sleepers running around the inside, and a cast iron turntable machine in the centre of the circle marked "William Sellers & Co. Philadelphia No. 1327". The brick edging of the turntable has a soldier course capping, but is otherwise in stretcher bond.[6]

Two rectangular ash pits were reportedly located to the north of the turntable, one of which was formerly within the now no longer extant engine shed. These were described in an earlier study and on historic plans, but were not confirmed to be extant at the time of the station's heritage listing.[6]

Footbridge (2005)

A modern concrete, steel and glass structure with lift and stairs to platform, also modern canopy connecting platform building to the footbridge.[6]

Bong Bong Street Overbridge (c. 2005)

A modern concrete road overbridge with concrete piers, located south of the footbridge. Excluded from listing.[6]

Landscape/natural features

There are views from the Station footbridge and platform to the southeast to the ocean and Norfolk Island pine plantings along the Kiama ocean frontage respectively.[6]

Condition

The platform building and island platform were in good condition at the time of the heritage listing, with the modern footbridge and overbridge in very good condition. The condition of the turntable was unknown, and it was unclear if the ash pits were still extant.[6]

The platform and platform building are intact except for minor additions (modern platform canopies). The yard structures at Kiama (with the exception of the turntable and possibly the ash pits) have been removed.[6]

Heritage listing

Kiama Railway Station group - including the platform, platform building, turntable and ash pits - are of State heritage significance. Kiama Railway Station is of historical significance as the first railway station on this section of the Illawarra line completed in 1893 from Bombo to Bomaderry, and for its role as a transport hub for the town of Kiama since 1893. The turntable and ash pits are remnant structures from a once substantial yard layout which served the dairying and pastoral industries. The Kiama Railway Station 1893 platform building is of aesthetic significance as the first example of an island platform building that became the model for the standard plans for this building type, known as A8-A10, issued by the NSW Railways in 1899. The building has particularly fine detailing to platform facades and awnings. The Kiama turntable is rare (one of only 3 turntables now extant on the Illawarra line - Bomaderry, Waterfall and Kiama) and of technical significance.[6]

Kiama railway station was listed on the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999 having satisfied the following criteria.[6]

The place is important in demonstrating the course, or pattern, of cultural or natural history in New South Wales.

Kiama Railway Station is of historical significance as the first railway station on this section of the Illawarra line completed in 1893 from Bombo to Bomaderry, and for its role as a transport hub for the town of Kiama since 1893. The yard remains are remnant structures from a once substantial yard layout which served the dairying and pastoral industries.[6]

The place is important in demonstrating aesthetic characteristics and/or a high degree of creative or technical achievement in New South Wales.

The Kiama Railway Station's 1893 platform building is of aesthetic significance as the first example of an island platform building that became the model for the standard A8-A10 plans issued in 1899. The building has particularly fine detailing to platform facades and awnings. The turntable is of technical significance as evidence of late 19th century railway technology.[6]

The place has strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group in New South Wales for social, cultural or spiritual reasons.

The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place, and can provide a connection to the local community's past.[6]

The place possesses uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of the cultural or natural history of New South Wales.

The Kiama turntable is rare (one of only 3 turntables now extant on the Illawarra line - Bomaderry, Waterfall and Kiama).[6]

The place is important in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a class of cultural or natural places/environments in New South Wales.

The Kiama Railway Station platform building is considered a fine representative platform building of the design later known as A8-A10, predating the issue of the standard designs in 1899, and forming a model for platform buildings of this design.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b Asset Standards Authority (30 April 2015). "Train Operating Conditions (TOC) Manual – Track Diagrams (version 3.0)" (PDF). 
  2. ^ Transport for New South Wales (21 June 2014). "New Kiama Commuter Car Park and Shell Cove Station reach next stage". 
  3. ^ Bozier, Rolfe. "NSWrail.net: Kiama Station". 
  4. ^ Bureau of Transport Statistics. "Train Statistics 2014" (PDF). Transport NSW. Retrieved 13 July 2018. 
  5. ^ a b c d "South Coast line timetable". Transport for NSW. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x "Kiama Railway Station Group and Turntable, New South Wales State Heritage Register (NSW SHR) Number H01176". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  7. ^ a b c Office of Environment & Heritage (17 February 2010). "Kiama Railway Station Group and Turntable". 
  8. ^ Office of Environment & Heritage (5 July 2009). "Bombo Railway Station Group". 
  9. ^ Office of Environment & Heritage (7 December 2009). "NSW heritage register: Bomaderry railway station and yard group". Retrieved 16 August 2015. 
  10. ^ "Electrifying news". South Coast Register. 20 November 2001. 
  11. ^ "Govt announces Kiama-Bomaderry rail electrification". ABC News. 1 July 2005. 
  12. ^ Opal card available on all Sydney trains by next Friday Sydney Morning Herald 20 March 2014
  13. ^ "Premier Illawarra route 71". Transport for NSW. 
  14. ^ "Kiama Coaches route 701". Transport for NSW. 
  15. ^ "Kiama Coaches route 702". Transport for NSW. 

Attribution

CC-BY-icon-80x15.png This Wikipedia article contains material from Kiama Railway Station Group and Turntable, entry number 01176 in the New South Wales State Heritage Register published by the State of New South Wales and Office of Environment and Heritage 2018 under CC-BY 4.0 licence, accessed on 2 June 2018.

External links

  • Media related to Kiama railway station at Wikimedia Commons
  • Kiama station details Transport for New South Wales
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