Kenzo Yokoyama

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Kenzo Yokoyama
横山 謙三
Personal information
Full name Kenzo Yokoyama
Date of birth (1943-01-21) January 21, 1943 (age 75)
Place of birth Saitama, Saitama, Japan
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Playing position Goalkeeper
Youth career
1962–1965 Rikkyo University
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1966–1977 Mitsubishi Motors 136 (0)
Total 136 (0)
National team
1964–1974 Japan 49 (0)
Teams managed
1976–1983 Mitsubishi Motors
1988–1991 Japan
1994 Urawa Reds
2000 Urawa Reds
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Kenzo Yokoyama (横山 謙三, Yokoyama Kenzō, born January 21, 1943) is a former Japanese football player and manager. He played for Japan national team. He also managed Japan national team.

Club career

Yokoyama was born in Saitama on January 21, 1943. After graduating from Kawaguchi High School and Rikkyo University, he joined his local club Mitsubishi Motors in 1966. He played as regular goalkeeper from first season and played all matches in Japan Soccer League until 1974. In 1975, he was deprived of regular goalkeeper by Mitsuhisa Taguchi. The club won the league champions 2 times (1969 and 1973) and 2nd place 6 times. The club also won 1971 and 1973 Emperor's Cup. He retired in 1977. He played 136 games in the league. He was elected Best Eleven 7 times.

National team career

In October 1964, when Yokoyama was a Rikkyo University student, he was elected Japan national team for 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. At this competition, he debuted and played all matches on behalf of Tsukasa Hosaka fractured his hand just before Olympics. After that, Yokoyama became a regular goalkeeper at Japan national team. In 1968, he was elected Japan for 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. He played all matches and Japan won Bronze Medal.[1] He also played at 1966, 1970 and 1974 Asian Games. He played 49 games for Japan until 1974.[2]

Coaching career

In 1976, when Yokoyama played for Mitsubishi Motors (later Urawa Reds), he became a playing manager as Hiroshi Ninomiya successor. In 1978, the club won all three major titles in Japan; Japan Soccer League, JSL Cup and Emperor's Cup. It was first domestic treble for a Japanese club. The club also won 1980 Emperor's Cup, 1981 JSL Cup and 1982 Japan Soccer League. He resigned in 1984. In 1988, he became a manager for Japan national team as Yoshinobu Ishii successor. At 1990 World Cup qualification in 1989, Japan lost in First round. Although Yokoyama managed at 1990 Asian Games, he resigned in 1991. In 1994, he became a manager for Urawa Reds as Takaji Mori successor. However, the club finished at the bottom in J1 League and he resigned end of season. In 1995, he became a general manager. From October 2000, he managed the club. In 2002, he resigned as general manager.

In 2005, Yokoyama was elected Japan Football Hall of Fame.

Club statistics

Club performance League
Season Club League Apps Goals
Japan League
1966 Mitsubishi Motors JSL Division 1 14 0
1967 14 0
1968 14 0
1969 14 0
1970 14 0
1971 14 0
1972 14 0
1973 18 0
1974 18 0
1975 2 0
1976 0 0
1977 0 0
Country Japan 136 0
Total 136 0

National team statistics

[2]

Japan national team
Year Apps Goals
1964 1 0
1965 4 0
1966 6 0
1967 5 0
1968 3 0
1969 3 0
1970 12 0
1971 6 0
1972 3 0
1973 2 0
1974 4 0
Total 49 0

Managerial statistics

[3]

Team From To Record
G W D L Win %
Urawa Reds 1994 1994 44 14 0 30 031.82
Total 44 14 0 30 031.82

Awards

References

  1. ^ "Kenzo Yokoyama Biography and Statistics". Sports Reference. Retrieved 2009-05-08.
  2. ^ a b Japan National Football Team Database
  3. ^ J.League Data Site(in Japanese)

External links

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