July 1948

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
01 02 03
04 05 06 07 08 09 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31

The following events occurred in July 1948:

July 1, 1948 (Thursday)

  • Soviet representatives withdrew from the Allied Kommandatura in Berlin, ending the last vetige of co-operation between the four powers in Germany.[1]
  • US President Harry S. Truman signed a Republican-sponsored housing bill, but criticized it as "slipshod" for failing to provide any public housing or slum clearance.[2]
  • Idlewild International Airport (known today as John F. Kennedy International Airport) opened in Queens, New York.[3]
  • A law banning pinball machines and other "gaming devices" went into effect in New York City, one day after Mayor William O'Dwyer signed the measure to prohibit them after a brief public hearing. The machines had been associated with gambling and organized crime, despite some on the council maintaining that they were merely harmless amusements. The ban would remain in effect until 1976.[4][5]
  • Born: Ever Hugo Almeida, footballer, in Salto, Uruguay; John Ford, singer-songwriter, in Fulham, London, England; Michael McGimpsey, politician, in Donaghadee, Ireland
  • Died: Charles Herrold, 62, American inventor and pioneer radio broadcaster

July 2, 1948 (Friday)

July 3, 1948 (Saturday)

July 4, 1948 (Sunday)

July 5, 1948 (Monday)

July 6, 1948 (Tuesday)

July 7, 1948 (Wednesday)

July 8, 1948 (Thursday)

  • Israeli forces in the north of Palestine commenced Operation Dekel with the objective of capturing Nazareth and the Lower Galilee, while the Givati Brigade launched Operation An-Far with the goal of gaining control of approaches in southern Judea and blocking the advance of the Egyptian army.
  • American, British and French authorities in Berlin drastically cut electric power to save coal.[12]
  • Born: Raffi, children's musician, as Raffi Cavoukian in Cairo, Egypt

July 9, 1948 (Friday)

July 10, 1948 (Saturday)

July 11, 1948 (Sunday)

  • Florida Senator Claude Pepper announced he was challenging President Truman for the Democratic nomination for president, claiming he had the support of twenty-two states in a "stop Truman" movement.[17]
  • Born: Martin Rushent, record producer, in Enfield, Middlesex, England (d. 2011)
  • Died: King Baggot, 68, American silent movie actor, director and screenwriter; Franz Weidenreich, 75, German anatomist and physical anthropologist

July 12, 1948 (Monday)

July 13, 1948 (Tuesday)

July 14, 1948 (Wednesday)

  • Riots broke out all over Italy after Italian Communist leader Palmiro Togliatti was shot three times outside the Chamber of Deputies by a university student. Communists called for a general strike to start the next day to pressure the Alcide De Gasperi government to resign.[20]
  • 35 Alabama and Mississippi delegates walked out of the Democratic National Convention in protest against Truman's new mandate and the party's civil rights platform.[21]
  • Born: Goodwill Zwelithini kaBhekuzulu, King of the Zulu nation, in Nongoma, South Africa
  • Died: Harry Brearley, 77, English metallurgist credited with the invention of stainless steel

July 15, 1948 (Thursday)

July 16, 1948 (Friday)

July 17, 1948 (Saturday)

July 18, 1948 (Sunday)

July 19, 1948 (Monday)

July 20, 1948 (Tuesday)

July 21, 1948 (Wednesday)

July 22, 1948 (Thursday)

July 23, 1948 (Friday)

July 24, 1948 (Saturday)

July 25, 1948 (Sunday)

July 26, 1948 (Monday)

July 27, 1948 (Tuesday)

  • President Truman addressed a special session of Congress urging immediate enactment of anti-inflation and public housing legislation, as well as adoption of his civil rights program. "We cannot afford to wait for the next Congress to act," Truman declared, adding that the eight months before the 81st Congress could get to work "would be much too long."[45]
  • Israeli forces launched Operation GYS with the objective of creating an Israeli enclave in the northern Negev desert, but had to retreat after heavy resistance.
  • Born: Peggy Fleming, figure skater, in San Jose, California; Greg Gagne, professional wrestler, in Robbinsdale, Minnesota
  • Died: Joe Tinker, 68, American baseball player

July 28, 1948 (Wednesday)

July 29, 1948 (Thursday)

July 30, 1948 (Friday)

July 31, 1948 (Saturday)

References

  1. ^ Middleton, Drew (July 2, 1948). "Soviet Withdraws from Allied Body Governing Berlin". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  2. ^ "President Signs, Hits Housing Bill". The New York Times: p. 8. July 2, 1948. 
  3. ^ The Encyclopedia of New York State. Syracuse University Press. 2005. p. 1574. ISBN 9780815608080. 
  4. ^ "Pinball Ban Here Is In Effect Today". The New York Times: p. 18. July 1, 1948. 
  5. ^ Meares, Hadley (August 15, 2016). "A menace to society: the war on pinball in America". Aeon. Retrieved May 20, 2018. 
  6. ^ "Hollywood Youth Topples Bromwich". The New York Times: p. 11. July 3, 1948. 
  7. ^ Matthews, Herbert L. (July 4, 1948). "Miss Brough Wins Three Net Crowns in English Event". The New York Times: p. S1. 
  8. ^ Middleton, Drew (July 5, 1948). "3,000 Tons of Food Flown To West Berlin in 22 Hours". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  9. ^ Daniel, Clifton (July 6, 1948). "Britain Socializes Wide Health Field". The New York Times: p. 5. 
  10. ^ a b Leonard, Thomas M. (1977). Day By Day: The Forties. New York: Facts On File, Inc. p. 805. ISBN 0-87196-375-2. 
  11. ^ "Satchel Paige". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 20, 2018. 
  12. ^ Middleton, Drew (July 9, 1948). "Electricity Is Cut In Western Berlin to Conserve Coal". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  13. ^ Currivan, Gene (July 10, 1948). "Arab-Israeli War Gains Momentum; Tel Aviv Is Bombed". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  14. ^ "Rival Forces Gird". The New York Times: p. 1. July 9, 1948. 
  15. ^ "Reno 'Stockade' Ruled Legal". San Bernardino Sun: p. 1. July 10, 1948. 
  16. ^ "Turkey Gets New Election Law". The New York Times: p. 26. July 11, 1948. 
  17. ^ Lawrence, W. H. (July 12, 1948). "Pepper Comes Out As A Truman Rival". The New York Times: p. 4. 
  18. ^ "Books Published Today". The New York Times: p. 17. July 12, 1948. 
  19. ^ White, William S. (July 14, 1948). "Mississippi Bolters Seated After Fight". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  20. ^ "Riots Sweep Italy After an Assassin Wounds Togliatti". The New York Times: p. 1, 18. July 15, 1948. 
  21. ^ White, William S. (July 15, 1948). "Truman Is Shunned In Votes of South". The New York Times: p. 1, 9. 
  22. ^ Lawrence, W. H. (July 15, 1948). "Victory Sweeping". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  23. ^ "Truman's Democratic Convention Acceptance Speech". PBS. Retrieved May 20, 2018. 
  24. ^ Hamilton, Thomas J. (July 16, 1948). "U. N. Council Orders Truce In Palestine Within 3 Days On Penalty Of Sanctions". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  25. ^ "Both Sides Accept Jerusalem Peace; Israel Backs Truce". The New York Times: p. 1. July 17, 1948. 
  26. ^ Cortesi, Arnoldo (July 16, 1948). "Reds to End Strike Today In Italy as Government Wins". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  27. ^ Drebinger, John (July 17, 1948). "Durocher to Manage Giants; Ott Quits; Shotton to Dodgers". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  28. ^ "Key Largo". American Film Institute. Retrieved May 20, 2018. 
  29. ^ Popham, John N. (July 18, 1948). "Southerners Name Thurmond to Lead Anti-Truman Fight". The New York Times: p. 1, 3. 
  30. ^ "Prague Seizes 71 As Agents for U. S.". The New York Times: p. 1, 17. July 18, 1948. 
  31. ^ "New Palestine Truce Begun; Time Limit Asked By Arabs; Major U. N. Victory Is Seen". The New York Times: p. 1. July 19, 1948. 
  32. ^ Hornbaker, Tim (2007). National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Pro Wrestling. ECW Press. pp. 8–9. ISBN 9781554902743. 
  33. ^ Walz, Jay (July 20, 1948). "U. S., Belgrade Sign Debt Agreements". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  34. ^ "300,000 Stand Silent in Rain As Pershing Is Borne to Rest". The New York Times: p. 1. July 20, 1948. 
  35. ^ Berger, Meyer (July 21, 1948). "12 U. S. Communists Indicted In Anti-Government Plot; Foster, Davis, Other Sized". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  36. ^ Handler, M. S. (July 22, 1948). "Tito, Defiant, Says Cominform Sought to Stir Civil War". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  37. ^ Middleton, Drew (July 24, 1948). "2,811 Tons of Supplies Flown In by West in Day — Soviet to Revise Currency — Statements by Soklovsky Denied". The New York Times: p. 4. 
  38. ^ Daniel, Clifton (July 24, 1948). "Malaya Outlaws Four Red Groups". The New York Times: p. 4. 
  39. ^ Lawrence, W. H. (July 25, 1948). "Wallace Accepts, Calling on Allies to Give Up Berlin". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  40. ^ Lawrence, W. H. (July 26, 1948). "New Party Blocks Ban on Endorsing Red Foreign Policy". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  41. ^ "Text of the Platform as Approved for Adoption Today by the Progressive Party". The New York Times: p. 29–32. July 25, 1948. 
  42. ^ "Nazi Who Freed Mussolini Flees From German Camp". The New York Times: p. 10. July 28, 1948. 
  43. ^ Morrow, Edward A. (July 27, 1948). "U.S., Britain Bar Rail Traffic With Russian German Zone; Soviet's Police Chief Ousted". The New York Times: p. 1. 
  44. ^ Briley, Ron (2011). The Baseball Film in Postwar America: A Critical Study, 1948–1962. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company. p. 31. ISBN 9780786484799. 
  45. ^ Leviero, Anthony (July 28, 1948). "11-Point Plan Set". The New York Times: p. 1, 3. 
  46. ^ Thill, Scott (July 28, 2010). "July 28, 1948: IG Farben Explosion Punctuates Nuremberg Trial". Wired. Retrieved May 20, 2018. 
  47. ^ Trussell, C. P. (July 31, 1948). "Woman Links Spies to U.S. War Offices and White House". The New York Times: p. 1, 4. 
  48. ^ Loftus, Joseph A. (August 1, 1948). "Currie Accused of Helping Spies; A Roosevelt Aides". The New York Times: p. 1. 
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=July_1948&oldid=842672585"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/July_1948
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "July 1948"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA