Jukō-in

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Entrance to Jukō-in, a sub-temple of Daitoku-ji
Miyoshi Nagayoshi, painting on silk (1566); an Important Cultural Property

Jukō-in (聚光院) is a sub-temple of Daitoku-ji, Kyoto, Japan. Founded in 1566 as the mortuary temple of Miyoshi Nagayoshi, in 1589 Sen no Rikyū designated it as the mortuary temple for his family.[1] The Hondō (1583) and chashitsu (1739) are Important Cultural Properties and the gardens have been designated a Place of Scenic Beauty.[2][3][4] A painting of Miyoshi Nagayoshi (1566) has also been designated an Important Cultural Property.[5] The temple also contains a great number of fusuma paintings done by Kanō Eitoku.

See also

References

  1. ^ Levine, Gregory P.A. (2005). Daitokuji: The Visual Cultures of a Zen Monastery. University of Washington Press. p. 107. ISBN 0-295-98540-2. 
  2. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  3. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  4. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  5. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 

Further reading

Levine, Gregory (1997). Jukōin: Art, Architecture, and Mortuary Culture at a Japanese Zen Buddhist Temple. Princeton University (PhD diss.). 

Coordinates: 35°02′38″N 135°44′43″E / 35.04389°N 135.74528°E / 35.04389; 135.74528


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