Jonathan Nsenga

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Olympic medal record
Men's athletics
European Indoor Championships
Bronze medal – third place 1996 Stockholm 60 m hurdles

Jonathan Nsenga (born 21 April 1973) is a retired Belgian hurdler.

He was born in Mons and represented the club OCAN.[1] In his early career he won the silver medal at the 1994 Jeux de la Francophonie,[2] the gold medal at the 1995 Universiade,[3] the bronze medal at the 1996 European Indoor Championships[4] and the silver medal at the 1997 Universiade.[3] He participated at the 1992 World Junior Championships,[4] the 1994 European Championships,[5] the 1995 World Indoor Championships, the 1995 World Championships, the 1996 Olympic Games and the 1997 World Championships without reaching the final. In 1997 he received a three-month doping ban for ephedrine use.[4]

After the doping ban he finished fourth at the 1998 European Indoor Championships, eighth at the 1998 European Championships, eighth at the 1999 World Championships[4] and second at the 1999 Universiade[3] and seventh at the 2000 European Indoor Championships.[6] He also competed at the 2000 Olympic Games, the 2001 World Championships, the 2002 European Championships, the 2003 World Indoor Championships, the 2003 World Championships (did not finish), the 2005 World Championships[4] and the 2006 European Championships (did not finish) without reaching the final.[7]

He became Belgian champion in 1994, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2005 and 2006.[8] His personal best time was 13.25 seconds in the 110 metres hurdles, achieved in the semifinal of the 1998 European Championships in Budapest.[4] This is the Belgian national record as of 2007.[9] In the 60 metres hurdles he had 7.55 seconds, also achieved in 1998.[4] He was given the Golden Spike award in the same year.

He is now a coach. Among his athletes are Adrien Deghelt.[10]

References

  1. ^ "Jonathan N'Senga". Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  2. ^ "Francophone Games". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c "World Student Games (Universiade - Men)". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Jonathan Nsenga profile at IAAF
  5. ^ "Men 110m Hurdles European Championships 1994 Helsinki (FIN)". Todor Krastev. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  6. ^ "2000 European Indoor Championships, men's 60 m hurdles final". Die Leichtatletik-Statistik-Seite. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  7. ^ "Men 110m Hurdles European Championship 2006 G¶teborg (SWE)". Todor Krastev. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  8. ^ "Belgian Championships". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  9. ^ http://www.iaaf.org/statistics/toplists/inout=o/age=n/season=0/sex=M/all=y/legal=A/disc=110H/detail.html
  10. ^ "Redemption for Svoboda as the Czech takes 60m hurdles gold". European Athletics. 4 March 2011. Retrieved 5 March 2011. 
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