Johnston County, North Carolina

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Johnston County, North Carolina
County
County of Johnston
Johnston County, NC courthouse from NE 2.JPG
Johnston County Courthouse in Smithfield
Seal of Johnston County, North Carolina
Seal
Map of North Carolina highlighting Johnston County
Location in the U.S. state of North Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded June 28, 1746
Named for Gabriel Johnston
Seat Smithfield
Largest town Clayton
Area
 • Total 796 sq mi (2,062 km2)
 • Land 791 sq mi (2,049 km2)
 • Water 4.2 sq mi (11 km2), 0.5%
Population (est.)
 • (2014) 181,423
 • Density 229.4/sq mi (89/km²)
ZIP code(s) 27501, 27504, 27520, 27524, 27527, 27529, 27542, 27555, 27557, 27568, 27569, 27576, 27577, 27591, 27592, 27597, 27603, 28334, 28366
Area code(s) 919, 984
Congressional districts 2nd, 7th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.johnstonnc.com

Johnston County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 168,878.[1] Its county seat is Smithfield.[2]

Johnston County is included in the Raleigh, NC Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC Combined Statistical Area, which has a population of 1,998,808 as of U.S. Census 2012 Population Estimates.[3]

History

The county was formed in 1746 from Craven County. It was named for Gabriel Johnston, Governor of North Carolina from 1734 to 1752.[4] In 1752 parts of Johnston County, Bladen County, and Granville County were combined to form Orange County. In 1758 the eastern part of Johnston County became Dobbs County. In 1770 parts of Johnston County, Cumberland County, and Orange County were combined to form Wake County. Finally, in 1855 parts of Johnston County, Edgecombe County, Nash County, and Wayne County were combined to form Wilson County.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 796 square miles (2,060 km2), of which 791 square miles (2,050 km2) is land and 4.2 square miles (11 km2) (0.5%) is water.[5]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 5,691
1800 6,301 10.7%
1810 6,867 9.0%
1820 9,607 39.9%
1830 10,938 13.9%
1840 10,599 −3.1%
1850 13,726 29.5%
1860 15,656 14.1%
1870 16,897 7.9%
1880 23,461 38.8%
1890 27,239 16.1%
1900 32,250 18.4%
1910 41,401 28.4%
1920 48,998 18.3%
1930 57,621 17.6%
1940 63,798 10.7%
1950 65,906 3.3%
1960 62,936 −4.5%
1970 61,737 −1.9%
1980 70,599 14.4%
1990 81,306 15.2%
2000 121,965 50.0%
2010 168,878 38.5%
Est. 2016 191,450 [6] 13.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 121,965 people, 46,595 households, and 33,688 families residing in the county. The population density was 154 people per square mile (59/km²). There were 50,196 housing units at an average density of 63 per square mile (24/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 78.09% White, 15.65% Black or African American, 0.41% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 4.53% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. 7.74% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 46,595 households out of which 35.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.80% were married couples living together, 10.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.70% were non-families. 23.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.10% under the age of 18, 8.10% from 18 to 24, 34.20% from 25 to 44, 21.70% from 45 to 64, and 9.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 98.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,872, and the median income for a family was $48,599. Males had a median income of $33,008 versus $25,582 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,788. About 8.90% of families and 12.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.00% of those under age 18 and 19.40% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Presidential Elections Results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 63.3% 54,372 33.0% 28,362 3.7% 3,175
2012 63.2% 48,427 35.6% 27,290 1.3% 974
2008 61.4% 43,622 37.7% 26,795 0.8% 600
2004 67.9% 36,903 31.8% 17,266 0.4% 188
2000 66.1% 27,212 33.3% 13,704 0.6% 239
1996 58.2% 18,704 34.8% 11,175 7.0% 2,240
1992 48.7% 15,418 35.6% 11,284 15.7% 4,977
1988 64.0% 15,563 35.8% 8,717 0.2% 49
1984 67.3% 16,210 32.5% 7,833 0.2% 37
1980 51.3% 10,444 47.1% 9,601 1.6% 331
1976 45.1% 8,511 54.6% 10,301 0.4% 67
1972 79.2% 14,272 19.4% 3,488 1.4% 251
1968 33.1% 6,764 22.0% 4,492 45.0% 9,212
1964 42.2% 7,523 57.9% 10,326
1960 40.2% 6,660 59.8% 9,914
1956 33.2% 4,893 66.8% 9,852
1952 35.2% 5,429 64.8% 9,997
1948 24.7% 3,211 70.7% 9,188 4.6% 598
1944 34.8% 4,423 65.2% 8,282
1940 29.6% 4,192 70.4% 9,976
1936 27.8% 4,339 72.2% 11,253
1932 28.8% 3,887 70.9% 9,574 0.4% 50
1928 60.4% 7,696 39.6% 5,041
1924 51.2% 4,910 48.6% 4,656 0.2% 23
1920 48.1% 5,588 51.9% 6,030
1916 45.2% 2,857 54.8% 3,468
1912 25.8% 1,335 53.3% 2,757 20.9% 1,083

The county is governed by the Johnston County Board of Commissioners, a seven-member board of County Commissioners, elected to serve four-year terms. The commissioners enact policies such as establishment of the property tax rate, regulation of land use and zoning outside municipal jurisdictions, and adoption of the annual budget. Commissioners generally meet each month.[13]

Current (2017) members of the Johnston County Board of Commissioners are:[14]

  • Jeffrey P. Carver, Chairman
  • Ted G. Godwin, Vice Chairman
  • Cookie Pope
  • Allen L. Mims, Jr.
  • Chad M. Stewart
  • Keith Branch
  • Larry Wood

Rick Hester is the County Manager.

Johnston County is a member of the regional Triangle J Council of Governments. Johnston County 911 is the first 911 Agency in North Carolina to hold 'Tri Accreditation" from the National Academies of Emergency Dispatch in Fire, Police, and EMD Protocols.

Education

Higher education

Johnston County is home to Johnston Community College (JCC), a public, two-year, post-secondary college located in Smithfield, North Carolina. The college has off-campus centers throughout Johnston County.[15]

Primary and secondary education

Public education in Johnston County is served by the Johnston County School District, which has 46 schools and serves more than 35,400 students. [16] In addition, one charter schools and five private schools are located in the county.

Libraries

The Johnston County Public Affiliated Library system operates six branches throughout the county. The library system keeps books, periodicals and audio books and has recently expanded the selection to include downloadable e-books.[17] The Hocutt-Ellington Memorial Library in Clayton left the Johnston County affiliated library system in 2015. [18]

Culture

Visitor attractions in Johnston County include several heritage museums and historic sites. The Bentonville Battlefield State Historic Site is located in eastern Johnston County, and it is the largest Civil War Battlefield in North Carolina. The Battle of Bentonville was fought March 19–21, 1865, and was the only Confederate offensive targeted to stop General Sherman's march through the south.

The Tobacco Farm Life Museum in Kenly has been collecting artifacts and showcasing the heritage of the Eastern North Carolina farmer for over 25 years. The site includes a museum and restored farmstead, working blacksmith shop, one-room school house and the site hosts several events each year.

The Ava Gardner Museum located in Smithfield is home to an incredible collection of artifacts such as scripts, movie posters, costumes and personal belongings of screen legend, Ava Gardner, who was born and raised in Johnston County.

The Johnston County Heritage Center is in Downtown Smithfield, and houses artifacts from all over the county. The Heritage Center has become known as one of the best equipped facilities in the country for studying local history and genealogy.

The Johnston County Arts Council promotes arts in the county and its schools.[19] Smithfield is home to an annual Ava Gardner Film Festival (AGFF), which celebrates the life of the actress. In 2008 the festival screened over 40 films in four theaters, including world, regional and state premiers.[20] Rapper Petey Pablo mentions Johnston County in his hit song Raise Up.[21]

The Meadow community is home to Meadow Lights, an annual display of Christmas lights.

Media

Radio

  • 102.3
  • 99.1
  • 97.5
  • 92.1
  • 105.1
  • 101.9
  • 95.5
  • 98.5
  • 94.7
  • 93.9
  • 101.5
  • 102.3
  • 99.3
  • 100.7
  • 96.9

Newspapers

  • Clayton News-Star
  • Kenly News
  • Four Oaks-Benson News in Review
  • Princeton News Leader
  • The Selma News
  • Pine Level News
  • Pinceton News Leader
  • The Daily Record
  • The Smithfield Herald[permanent dead link]
  • The Cleveland Post
  • The Garner-Cleveland Record
  • The News & Observer

Communities

Map of Johnston County, North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels

Towns

Townships

  • Banner
  • Bentonville
  • Beulah
  • Boon Hill
  • Brogden
  • Clayton
  • Cleveland
  • Elevation
  • Ingrams
  • Meadow
  • Micro
  • O'Neals
  • Pine Level
  • Pleasant Grove
  • Selma
  • Smithfield
  • Wilders
  • Wilson Mills

Unincorporated communities

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 21, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates 2012 Combined Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on March 17, 2013. Retrieved 2013-03-14. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States (Report) (2nd ed.). Washington: Government Printing Office. p. 170 – via United States Geological Survey. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  12. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  13. ^ http://www.johnstonnc.com/mainpage.cfm?category_level_id=403
  14. ^ http://www.johnstonnc.com/mainpage.cfm?category_level_id=403&content_id=368
  15. ^ "Johnston Community College". 
  16. ^ https://www.johnston.k12.nc.us/district/about_the_district/district_profile
  17. ^ http://www.jocolib.org/
  18. ^ http://www.mdpl-nc.org/new/affiliate-libraries/clayton-transition-announcement/
  19. ^ "Johnston County Arts Council". Retrieved 2008-01-13. 
  20. ^ "Ava Gardner Festival". Retrieved 2008-01-13. 
  21. ^ Petey Pablo Raise Up lyrics on Yahoo! Music[permanent dead link]

Further reading

  • Johnston County, North Carolina, Court Martial Minutes, 1761-1779. Transcribed by Weynette Parks Haun (1st ed.). 1983. LCCN 83-244254. 
  • Marriages of Johnston County, North Carolina, 1762-1868. Compiled by Brent H. Holcomb. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. 1985. ISBN 0-8063-1120-7. LCCN 85-70012. 
  • Sanders, Jr., W. M.; Ragsdale, G. Y. (1922). Johnston County: Economic and Social. University of North Carolina. LCCN 39014760. OCLC 6523398 – via The Smithfield Observer. 

External links

Government
  • Official website
General information
  • Johnston County Heritage Center, with historical photos, online tours and exhibits, timelines, and facts
  • Johnston County Visitors Bureau, the official site for visitor information for Johnston County



Coordinates: 35°31′N 78°22′W / 35.52°N 78.37°W / 35.52; -78.37

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