John H. Wood Jr.

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John Howland Wood Jr.
Judge of the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas
In office
December 1, 1970 – May 29, 1979
Appointed by Richard Nixon
Preceded by new seat created by 84 Stat. 294
Succeeded by Lucius Desha Bunton III
Personal details
Born John Howland Wood Jr.
(1916-03-31)March 31, 1916
Rockport, Texas
Died May 29, 1979(1979-05-29) (aged 63)
San Antonio, Texas
Nationality American
Alma mater St. Mary's University B.B.A.
University of Texas School of Law LL.B.
Military service
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Navy
Years of service 1944 – 1954
Rank Lieutenant

John Howland Wood Jr. (March 31, 1916 – May 29, 1979) was an American lawyer and judge from Texas. He served as a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas before being assassinated by Charles Harrelson outside Wood's home in San Antonio, in 1979. Wood's killing was the first assassination of a federal judge in the 20th century.

Early life and education

Wood was born on March 31, 1916, to a prominent pioneer Texas family in Rockport, Texas. His great-great-grandfather, John Howland Wood, settled in Texas in 1836 and founded the towns of Rockport and Woodsboro, and took part in the Texas Revolution and American Civil War. His grandfather was a popular Democratic sheriff of Bexar County. Wood's father, John H. Wood Sr., was also a lawyer. Wood attended Thomas Jefferson High School in San Antonio. He received his Bachelor of Business Administration degree from St. Mary's University in 1935 and his Bachelor of Laws from the University of Texas School of Law in 1938.[1]

Career

Wood was in private practice in San Antonio from 1938 to 1970 with the law firm Beckmann, Stanard & Olson, except from 1944 to 1945, when he served as an ensign in the Navy during World War II. Wood was in the Naval Reserve from 1945 to 1954, as a Lieutenant.[2]

Federal judicial service

Wood was nominated by President Richard Nixon on October 7, 1970, to the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas to a new seat created by 84 Stat. 294. Confirmed by the Senate on November 25, 1970, he received commission on December 1, 1970. He served until his assassination in San Antonio on May 29, 1979.

Assassination

On May 29, 1979, Judge Wood was killed in San Antonio, Texas, by a shot from a high-powered rifle as he stood at the door of his automobile. He was struck in the small of the back and the bullet lodged near the upper part of his chest. Wood, known as "maximum John" for his harsh sentencing of drug traffickers, was assassinated by Charles Harrelson in a contract killing placed by Texas drug lord Jamiel Chagra, who was awaiting trial before the judge.[3] Wood's killing was the first assassination of a federal judge in the 20th century.[2] (Two other federal judges were assassinated in the 1980s, Richard J. Daronco in 1988 and Robert Smith Vance in 1989.)

Honors

John H. Wood Middle School, in San Antonio is named in his honor. The federal courthouse in San Antonio is also named for Wood.

See also

External links

FBI: The Untold Stories - The Murder of Judge John Wood on YouTube

References

  1. ^ Diehl, Kemper (30 May 1979). "U.S. Judge, Known for Severity In Drug Cases, Is Slain in Texas". The Washington Post. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Baker, Susan (11 Aug 2015). Murdered Judges: Of the 20th Century and Other Mysterious Deaths. Pale Horse Publishing. p. 274. ISBN 1587470780. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  3. ^ "Charles Harrelson Trial: 1982-83 - Chagra Testifies For Prosecution, Harrelson Alleges Complicated Set-up, Verdicts And Convictions, Harrelson's Son Funds Appeal". jrank.org. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
Legal offices
Preceded by
new seat
Judge of the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas
1970–1979
Succeeded by
Lucius Desha Bunton III
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