John Francon Williams

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John Francon Williams
Born John Francon Williams
1854
Llanllechid, Caernarvonshire, Wales
Died 4 September 1911
Alloa, Clackmannanshire
Nationality British
Occupation Editor, journalist, writer, geographer, historian, cartographer and inventor
Spouse(s) Barbara Balmain Dougall
Children John Balmain, Aeneas Francon Williams, David Dougal Williams, George Stanley, Margaret Mary Ann

John Francon Williams FRGS (1854 – 4 September 1911) was a Welsh writer, geographer, historian, journalist, cartographer and inventor, born in Llanllechid, Caernarvonshire. His seminal work was The Geography of the Oceans.

Family

John Francon Williams was the second son of Richard Williams (b. 1818 Llanllechid) and his wife Mary (b. 1822 Denbighshire). Richard and Mary were blessed with two further sons William (b. 1843) and Henry (b. 1858), and two daughters, Mary Jr. (b. 1857)[1] and Grace (b. 1862).[2] All the siblings were born in Llanllechid, North Wales. The Williams family first lived at Cenfaes Terrace and then, as the family grew larger, moved to a stone cottage at 5 Pencennant (Pen-y-ceunant), one of a row of traditional terraced stone cottages in Llanllechid, where all their immediate neighbours were also named Williams. The cottages positioned on a gentle slope had views directly overlooking the Ogwen Valley and the Snowdonian Mountains in the distance. Richard worked nearby as a slate quarryman (most probably) in Penrhyn Quarry located north of Bethesda overlooking the River Ogwen. The Quarry was owned and run by the wealthy Dawkins-Pennant family, who also owned Penrhyn Castle and most of the land in the area. Over time, Richard Williams was promoted to the role of 'Overlooker' (a term used in the 19th century for a superintendent or overseer)[3] at the slate quarry where he worked.

During the next decade an increase of population in the area arose due to the extension of slate and stone quarrying. In the Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales (published in 1870-2), Llanllechid is described as thus: "Llanllechid, a village, a parish, and a sub-district in Bangor district, Carnarvon. The village stands near the river Ogwen, 3½ miles SW by S of Aber r. station, and 3½ SE of Bangor; and has a post office under Bangor, and a fair on 29 October."[4]

John and his two brothers and two sisters all attended the local school, where John showed a particularly strong aptitude and interest in Geography and History. By the mid-1870s, as a young adult, John moved away from Wales to Northampton where he took up a post as a school teacher. It was in Northampton that John met his future wife, Barbara.

On 8 July 1876, John married Barbara Balmain Dougall at St. Giles Church, Northampton.[5] The newlyweds first home together was at Palmerston Road, Northampton. Over the succeeding years John and Barbara had five children: four sons; John Balmain, (b. 1877, Northampton),[6] Aeneas Francon Williams (b. 1886, Liscard, Cheshire),[7] David Dougal Williams (b. 1888, Liscard),[8] and George Stanley (b. 14 April 1890, at Hope Place in the Georgian Quarter of Liverpool) – and one daughter; Margaret Mary Ann (b. 1891, Liscard.)[9] George was baptised on 25 May 1890.[10] During this period the family moved house frequently and resided at Hope Place, Liverpool and in Liscard at 2 Massey Park, Wallasey, Chester, [11] in order to remain close to Liverpool where John had begun a career as a journalist and as a subsequent editor on a local Liverpool newspaper. Also during the early 1880s, John's sister Mary and his brother Henry left the Williams' family home in Llanllechid. [12] Only John's sister Grace, who now had a career as a dressmaker, remained living with her parents at the family home. In 1885, Grace married Welsh-born Robert William Williams (1861-1931) in Bethesda, North Wales, hence Grace and her future siblings retained the Williams surname.

In 1891, John's father, mother and a brother died (most probably due to the influenza epidemic that spread across Wales and Northern England),[13] [14] and in December that same year John and Barbara's young daughter Margaret Mary Ann Williams also died and was buried on 30 December at Massey Park. In late 1891, Grace and Robert and their two young children, Robert Henry (b. 1886) and William John (b. 1888) emigrated to the USA arriving in New York in January 1892. The family settled in Granville, Washington, New York.

Hope Place, Liverpool, (Georgian townhouses)

Barbara Balmain Dougall was born in 1851 in Dunning, Perthshire, Scotland.[15] She was one of seven children (Aeneas, David, Margaret, Isabella, Ann, Mary and Barbara) to John and Ann Dougall. John Dougall was a handloom weaver and his wife Ann was a cotton winder.[15] Though most of the Dougall children entered the weaving trade, Aeneas became a teacher.

Career

Early career

John Francon Williams worked as a journalist and editor on various newspapers and journals in Liverpool. In 1876 Williams was elected a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.[16][17]

Association with George Philip & Son

Geography of America by John Francon Williams

Williams started his publishing career in Liverpool under the guidance of the renowned cartographer and map publisher George Philip. George Philip & Son published maps and educational books, and in 1881 they published Williams's first book, A Class-Book of Modern Geography, with examination questions, notes & index. The book was written in collaboration with cartographer Professor William Hughes (geographer) FRGS, and became the first publication in a successful run of works over the coming two decades by Williams for the publishing house George Philip & Son. Between 1881 and 1893, George Philip & Son published twelve English editions of A Class-Book of Modern Geography. George Philip (1800–1882) and his son George Jr (1823–1902), ran George Philip & Son, and when George Philip Sr retired on 1 July 1879 George Philip Jr took control of the business. The publishing house produced geographical and educational publications and operated from Caxton Buildings in Liverpool, and from 30–32 Fleet Street in London.

"Further expansion was prompted by the demand from board schools established after 1870 for general textbooks, school stationery and equipment, and specialist atlases and wall maps. The firm also supplied atlases and textbooks for many overseas countries in several languages."[18] George Philip Jr spotted a gap in the market for quality school textbooks, and over the following two decades Williams wrote and edited over forty books that sold worldwide.

The Geography of the Oceans

The Geography of the Oceans by John Francon Williams 1881

In 1881, Williams's seminal book The Geography of the Oceans was published.[19]

"It may therefore be truly said that the present ocean is but a vast workshop, where the materials of future continents are elaborated and preserved."

The Geography of the Oceans, John Francon Williams, 1881.[20]

The Geography of the Oceans focuses on topics such as: General Geography of the Oceans, Physical Geography of the Oceans, the Geography of Particular Oceans. The various sections focus on: the distribution of land and water, oceanic river-systems, the salts of the sea, the density, color and phosphorescence of the sea, distribution of marine life, temperature of the ocean, movements of the ocean, sidereal movements or tides, of the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Antarctic and the Arctic Ocean. It was the first book to cover with such intensity the geography of the oceans. 'A valuable little book entitled The Geography of the Oceans, which may be regarded almost as a new departure in geographical science,' claimed the book reviewer in The Cornish Telegraph, who continued,[21] "I have found the book as fascinating as one of Jules Verne's novels." The Daily Gazette called it, "A new geographical work of great importance".[22]

Contour Map Of The World by J. Francon Williams 1881

In 1881, Williams and his family moved to West Derby in Lancashire, where they lived at 52 Bonsall Road.[23]

George Philip & Son employed three in-house cartographers: John Bartholomew the elder, William Hughes (geographer) and August Petermann. They were regarded as Europe's finest cartographers. As well as being a good friend of John Bartholomew J., Williams was also a friend of the Scottish journalist and writer John Geddie. In June 1882 Williams, with cartographer John Bartholomew junior, nominated Geddie as a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. Williams was also acquainted with Edwin Ransom, owner of Kempston Mill, Bedford, Mayor of Bedford 1855–56, and proprietor of the Bedfordshire Times 1872–79. Ransom nominated Williams as a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society in March 1876.[24]

Williams also tried his hand as an inventor. One of his inventions (of which there were two different designs) was a new spaced measuring rule or scale, registered and patented on 21 April 1884.[25] The measuring rule was applicable in printing, painting, embossing or similar. He also patented several other inventions including, ‘pencils with moveable leads’ and ‘pen-and-ink holders’ registered in 1883,[26] ‘letter clips and files’ and additional ‘pencils with moveable leads’ registered in 1884,[27] and ‘educational appliances’ in 1885 [28]

On 29 December 1885, John F. Williams attended the first annual children's Athletic Fete and Industrial Exhibition, held at the Liverpool Gymnasium in Myrtle Street under the auspices of the Liverpool Council of Education and School Board.[29] Williams judged the Map Drawing category and the Penmanship category. Over 900 entries were received for the different categories, and many of the books and paint-box prizes were gifted by George Philip & Son, Liverpool.

The Intermediate Class-Book of Modern Geography by John Francon Williams 1886

In 1887, Philips published Philip's Handy Volume Atlas of the World by William Hughes (geographer) and John Francon Williams. The pocket book contained 110 maps and plans all finely tinted, accompanied by statistical notes and other information. The Leeds Mercury said; "It would hardly be possible to find greater excellence in so convenient a form as we have in Philip's Handy Volume Atlas of the World."[30] ‘The volume deserves to have a wide circulation,’ stated the Liverpool Mercury, and declared, "In fact, it is quite a little geographical library in itself."[31] Williams dedicated the book to the President of the Royal Geographical Society, Lord Aberdare, Henry Austin Bruce, 1st Baron Aberdare. A glowing review of Philips' Handy Volume and Atlas of the World appeared in the West London Observer on Saturday 23 July 1887: "In days when the facilities of locomotion are such that everybody runs about the world, and the process of what popularly known as 'globe-trotting' goes on to an extraordinary extent and in a systematic manner, a comprehensive volume, small, compact, admirably arranged, clearly printed and well bound, and which can be carried in the pocket, like that published by Messrs. Philip & Son of Liverpool and London, is entitled to be regarded as a special boon. Containing more than a hundred maps with brief but succinct notes and a capital index, the different countries of the world are revealed in all essential particulars with luminous perspicacity. The maps are fine specimens of engraving, and the letterpress clear and distinct. The author is Mr. J. Francon Williams FRGS and his name will be a sufficient guarantee for the correctness of the data furnished up to the period of publication. The production of this most useful work must have entailed a large outlay, but it cannot be doubted that, as it will supply a popular want, the sale will be enormous, and fully compensate the enterprising publishers for the cost and trouble incurred. We earnestly recommend the 'Handy Volume', not alone to travellers, but to all who have occasion in connection with literary pursuits, or the prosecution of business, 'to survey mankind from China to Peru,' or over those wider districts, which a century ago were practically beyond even a poets pen."[32]

In the late 1880s, Williams worked in conjunction with the publisher and editor George Newnes (Sir George Newnes, 1st Baronet) – now regarded as the founding father of popular journalism – during the years when Newnes was building his publishing empire. It was during this period that Williams also founded his own publication.[33]

In 1887, Williams founded and edited the monthly magazine, Stories Illustrated.[34]

The Jubilee Atlas of the British Empire by John Francon Williams, published in 1887 to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria

In 1888, Philips' published several geographical atlases they named 'Handy-Volumes' compiled and written by Williams that were distributed widely worldwide; ‘All these compact and clearly-printed miniature works, suitable for pocket or desk, and rightly named ‘Handy-Volumes’ are supplied with indexes, and geographical, statistical and historical notes, carefully gathered by Mr. J. Francon Williams FRGS.’ [35]

In America, John’s history books were introduced into the school curriculum where they remained for many years.[36] Forever the businessman, on 4 July 1888, Williams wrote a letter from Liverpool to the politician and educator Hon. George William Ross in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in which Williams included as a gift a copy of his recently published Atlas of British America. Williams was hoping to break into the Canadian market. Ross was at that time the Minister of Education for Ontario in the Liberal government of Sir Oliver Mowat and oversaw the purchase of schoolbooks for the province. In the letter, Williams writes, ‘Permit me to beg your kind acceptance of the accompanying copy of our little Atlas of British America, and also to ask you to examine it with a view to its authorization for use in the public schools and colleges of your province.’ In 1899, Ross became the Premier of Ontario.[37] Whether, Ross ordered a shipment of Atlas of British America is not documented, but Williams’ attraction to Canada appears to have commenced from around this period.

In November 1889, John Francon Williams was introduced to HRH Albert Edward, Prince of Wales. During their meeting Williams presented the Prince of Wales with a copy of his 1887 book, Philips' Handy-volume Atlas of the British Empire. The copy is housed in The Royal Collection Trust at Windsor Castle, along with other John Francon Williams books.[38]

In 1891, Philip’s issued a series of Map-Drawing Books titled appropriately, Philips’ Series of Map-Drawing Books written and compiled by J. Francon Williams. A series of 24 books in two different editions were published; the Imperial at 13 in. by 11 in. priced at 6d, or the slightly smaller Crown edition at 10 in. by 8 in. priced at 3d. Each book contained a complete full-coloured map and an uncoloured map for the student to colour in and to complete names etc., an outline map with coastlines and lines of latitude and longitude, and a blank sheet with the border of only the map. The books allowed the student to draw the maps repeatedly.[39] During the same year, Philip’s also published a completely new set of three Grammar School Atlases edited by Williams: Philip’s Grammar School Atlas No. 1, for preparatory students with 15 full-coloured maps, Philip’s Grammar School Atlas No. 2, for junior students with 30 full-coloured maps, and Philip’s Grammar School Atlas No. 3 for senior students containing 75 full-coloured maps.[40] The atlases were referred to as being, ‘undoubtedly the finest examples of small atlases for ordinary school use ever issued.’

Also in 1891, Philip's published, Philips’ Picturesque History of England (with notes and three hundred illustrations and maps) by J. Francon Williams. The book retailed at 5s. A review in the Scotsman praised Williams for his ‘unflagging vivacity and narrative power. Incidents and characters are depicted in their true proportions.’[41] ‘The book is appropriately named in more ways than one. It tells the story of the English people - their growth, the development of their national institutions, the establishment of their worldwide empire, the achievements of their great monarchs, warriors, statesmen and writers, the social and economic conditions of the nation at various epochs. A distinctive feature of the work is the number and excellence of the illustrations.’

A Compendium of Modern Geography by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams, 1893, published by George Philip & Son, Liverpool & London

In 1893, George Philip & Son published the 866-page tome, A Compendium of Modern Geography - Physical - Political - Commercial, by William Hughes and John Francon Williams. Williams writes in the preface of the book, ‘This work, as the tile implies, is designed for the use of advanced students, and also as a work of reference for those who are engaged in teaching geography.’ Compiling the book was a mammoth undertaking. ‘All the Countries of the World, as well as the Continents, are described in a sufficiently exhaustive manner to meet the requirements of almost all examinations in geography. Due prominence has been given to the Mountain and River Systems and other natural features; the present political condition of each State is indicated and, bearing in mind the fact the study of Commercial geography is daily becoming of greater importance, the Industry and Trade of the principal countries are dealt with in considerable detail.’ Williams goes on to assure the reader, 'In the preparation of this work the best and most recent British and foreign authorities have been consulted, and no pains have been spared to make the book a reliable exponent of the geographical knowledge of the present day.'[42] It was Williams that compiled, edited and wrote the majority of the book as William Hughes (geographer) had passed away seventeen years earlier in 1876.

In the decade prior to the arrival of Pears' Cyclopaedia (1897), a much smaller work measuring 135 x 105 mm was available. It sold for sixpence in cloth, or one shilling in leather hardback, and was extremely popular, selling 800,000 copies by 1896. Eli Lemon Sheldon (pen-name Dom Lemon) compiled the book. Its success led its publisher to create a series of similar little books that sold equally well. Number 36 in the series was A World Gazetteer compiled by John Francon Williams.[43] Williams' revised version had the same atlas, with slightly larger maps. George Philip & Son printed the book.

Later career

In 1896, with Williams' increase in wealth he moved his family yet again,[44] this time to a freehold property in Mount Pleasant Road in Wallasey, which he named Balmain, after his wife, whose middle name was Balmain.[45]

By late 1898, the Williams family had moved yet again and were now living in a detached house, Fairlight, in Forest Avenue, Chingford, London.[46]

In later life John Francon Williams focused his career on being a Publishers Representative (Agent). He would travel to Edinburgh, Birmingham, Liverpool, Leicester, Manchester, London and also abroad, primarily the United States and Canada, pursuing and securing contracts for publishing houses. One of the houses he acted for in Edinburgh was John Bartholomew and Son, which now belonged to his longtime friend, John George Bartholomew. Williams' eldest son, John Jr, would accompany his father on some of these trips. John Jr, was noted as being a sickly child, "who is much troubled with asthma and bronchitis."[47] In 1899, Williams’s friend Sir Alfred Lewis Jones of Messrs Elder, Dempster & Co., (a Liverpool, ship-owner) kindly gave Williams’s son John Jr a voyage on one of his steamers to New Orleans, in the hope that it would help with his medical condition.

One of the prime reasons why Williams travelled to the United States was to try and set up an Anglo-American Syndicate, which would help promote publishers, publishing houses and their products. Williams discusses this matter in a handwritten letter to his friend John George Bartholomew.[48] Here he mentions his "unavoidable connection" with map-maker George Washington Bacon, with whom he is working with on several projects, both editorial and administrative, and hopes that his friend Sir Alfred Lewis Jones (the millionaire ship-owner) might be interested in becoming a financial partner in the Syndicate. Williams was particularly keen to publish a Physical Atlas worldwide through the syndicate.

In 1899, Williams was commissioned by Mazawattee (publishers) to write a Gazetteer Pocket Atlas containing 9,000 to 10,000 places.[49] Williams was also commissioned by Alfred Harmsworth, (later 1st Viscount Northcliffe), founder of the Harmsworth Magazine (later known as the London Magazine), to write a series of articles. His first article, published at the start of 1900, was entitled Then and Now: 1800–1900, Why This is the Most Wonderful Century in Time. It was written to commemorate the advancement in engineering during the 19th century and to welcome in the 20th century.[50]

On 20 July 1900, John Francon Williams travelled to Boston, Massachusetts, from Liverpool aboard the SS Winifredian.[51]

In 1901, by the time George Philip Jr had retired from George Philip & Son, Williams had moved his family yet again, to 22 Queens Grove Road, Chingford in Essex.[52]

In 1901/02, the Williams family relocated yet again, this time to Clackmannan in Scotland, possibly for Barbara to be closer to her sisters, Ann and Margaret Dougall, along with whom they resided in Clackmannan at Mains House. Both were spinsters and died within a few days of one another, Ann Dougall on 17 March 1903 [53] and Margaret Dougall three days later on 20 March 1903 (one day after her sister's burial).[54] The sisters are buried next to each other in the old cemetery in Clackmannan.[55] The sisters brother Aeneas Dougall (who died on 24 March 1897) is also buried there.[56]

John Francon Williams travelled to New York City, leaving on 19 March 1904 from Liverpool aboard the SS Etruria.[57] He travelled as a representative for various publishing houses.[58]

John's wife Barbara died in Clackmannan on 24 November 1909 at the family home, Mains House.[59] She was buried alongside her sisters and brother in the old cemetery in Clackmannan.[60] She died from cancer of the liver.

The Hawes Junction rail crash

On Christmas Eve, 24 December 1910, the overnight express train from London to Glasgow departed at midnight from St Pancras Station, with scheduled stops at Manchester, Leeds, Skipton, etc. The train consisted of four timber-bodied coaches, two sleeping cars and two brake vans and a locomotive. John Francon Williams and his eldest son John Williams Jr. happened to be in Manchester attending to publishing business on 24 December and had arranged to spend Christmas Day with relatives and friends in Clackmannan in the Central Lowlands of Scotland. They decided to catch the overnight express train at Manchester, so that they could enjoy Christmas festivities in Clackmannan.

At 19 minutes to six in the morning, close to Hawes Junction, the express train travelling at high speed smashed into an oncoming locomotive. The express train concertina'd and careered off the tracks. Except for two electrically lit sleeping cars, the coaches were lit by the Pintsch oil gas system. The impact broke the gas pipe in one of the front carriages and an explosion followed. Fire spread quickly through the wooden carriages killing twelve trapped and injured passengers.

The Dundee Courier on Tuesday 27 December in their coverage of the Hawes Junction rail crash reported: The news of the disaster occasioned considerable anxiety to the relatives of Mr John Francon Williams, a prominent and highly-respected resident of Clackmannan. Mr Williams and his eldest son Mr John Williams, were in business in Manchester, and had sent word to their friends in Clackmannan that they intended to travel North with the night express so as to arrive home on Saturday morning for Christmas. The fact that they did not put in an appearance in Clackmannan on Saturday, coupled with the news of the disaster, naturally aroused fears for their safety in the minds of their waiting relatives. Telegraphic communication was opened up with the hotel in Manchester where Mr Williams had been staying, and yesterday (26 December) it was ascertained that, though the father and son had fully intended travelling with the ill-fated express, through pressure of business they had been compelled to postpone their departure till Monday evening, an arrangement, which, in the light of what subsequently occurred, may be regarded as providential. [61]

Later life

By 1911 John's landscape had changed dramatically. He was now boarding at 25 St. Stephen's Road, Leicester, with the Grimsley family; widow Fanny Grimsley and her three unmarried daughters, Eliza aged 37, Jane aged 25, and Martha aged 21.[62] Also boarding at the handsome 7-roomed property were four female lodgers. John was at this point in his career working as a Publishers Representative (agent) and still traveling extensively.

John Francon Williams died from a brain haemorrhage on 4 September 1911 in the County Hospital, Alloa, and is buried in an unmarked grave beside his wife in Clackmannan Cemetery in Clackmannanshire, Scotland.[63][64] He is identified as having had 42 published works in 79 publications in the World Catalogue (WorldCat).[65]

Clackmannan Cemetery

During World War I, John Francon Williams' eldest son, John Balmain Williams, enlisted in the Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) 12th Battalion [66] and was killed in action on 25 April 1918 at the 2nd Battle of Kemmel at Lagache Farm, west of Wytschaete in Flanders, Belgium, along with 100 men of the 12th Battalion Royal Scots.[67][68][69] John B. Williams is remembered in the Roll of Honour at the Royal Scots Memorial in the Hall of Honour at The Scottish National War Memorial located in Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh,[70] and at Tyne Cot Cemetery and Memorial located at West-Vlaanderen, in Belgium.[71]

John Francon Williams is also the father of George Stanley Williams (died 23 July 1954, Dundee District, Angus, Scotland), Aeneas Francon Williams (missionary, writer, poet, etc.), and David Dougal Williams (artist and art teacher), and the great-grandfather of writer Iain Cameron Williams.[72][73]

In 2016, the independent Australian retailer Readings[74] said of Williams’ The Geography of the Oceans; ‘This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.’[75]

Published Works

(The list is by no means comprehensive.)

Geography of the British Colonies and Dependencies by John Francon Williams, 1892
  • A Class-Book of Modern Geography, (with examination questions, notes, & index, by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – publ. George Phillip & Son, 1881. 12 editions were published in English between 1881 and 1893.[76]
  • The Geography of the Oceans by John Francon Williams – publ. George Phillip & Son, 1881. 2 editions in English were published in 1881.[77]
  • Elementary Class-Book of Modern Geography by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – George Phillip & Son, 1882. 2 editions in English were published in 1882 and 1888.
  • A Class-Book of Physical Geography by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1882. 7 editions in English published between 1882 and 1891.[78]
  • Philip's Elementary Atlas and Geography, containing 30 coloured maps, edited by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1882.[79]
  • Stories From English History by John Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1884.[80]
  • Philip’s Picturesque History of England, with illustrations and maps, by John Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1884.
  • Modern England: from the Ascension of James I to the Present Time, by John Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1884.[81]
  • Early England by John Francon Williams and John C. Crowley – Boston School Supply Co., 1884.[82]
  • Middle England: from the Accession of Henry II to the Death of Elizabeth by John Francon Williams and John C. Crowley – publ. Boston School Supply Co., 1884. 2 editions in English were published in 1884.[83]
  • Stories From English History by John Francon Williams and John C. Crowley – Boston School Supply Company, 1884.[84]
  • A Class-Book of Modern Geography with examination questions, by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – publ. George Philip & Son, 1885.
  • The Intermediate Class-Book of Modern Geography by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1886.
  • Philip's Elementary Atlas and Geography, containing the Essentials of the Geography of the World, and Thirty Coloured Maps, edited by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, London, 1886.
  • Philips Picturesque History of England by J. Francon Williams – publ. George Philip & Son, London, 1886.
Everybody's Gazetteer and Atlas of the World by John Francon Williams, published 1900
  • A Class-Book of Modern Geography, new and enlarged edition by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, London, 1887. 2 editions in English published in 1887.[85]
  • The Queen's Jubilee Atlas of the British Empire by John Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, London, 1887. 3 editions in English published in 1887.[86]
  • Elementary Class-Book of Physical Geography, new revised edition by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, London, 1887.
  • The Queen’s Jubilee Atlas of the British Empire, with descriptive and historical notes and statistical tables, by John Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, London, 1887. 2 English editions published in 1887.
  • Philip's Handy-Volume Atlas of the British Empire compiled and edited by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1887. (Several editions).[87]
  • Philip's Handy Volume Atlas of the World compiled and edited by J. Francon Williams, dedicated to the President of the Royal Geographical Society, Lord Aberdare – George Philip & Son, 1887.[88]
  • A Class-Book of Physical Geography, new and improved edition, by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, London, 1888. 5 English editions published between 1888 and 1891.
  • Philip's Handy-Volume Atlas of British America, with geographical, statistical and historical notes by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1888.
  • Philips’ Handy Volume Atlas of Australasia by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1888.[89]
Image taken from page 25 of 'A Class-Book of Physical Geography ... New and improved edition, revised by J. Francon Williams' (11122315735)
Image taken from page 25 of 'A Class-Book of Physical Geography ... New and improved edition, revised by J. Francon Williams' (11120476483)
  • Childs Atlas, edited by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1890.
  • Philip's Presentation Atlas for Young People, edited by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1890.
  • Young Geographer’s Pocket Atlas of the World, edited by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1890.
  • Philips’ Graphic School Atlas by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1890 [90]
  • Realistic Geography by J. Francon Williams – George Philip and Son, 1891.[91]
  • Philips’ Picturesque History of England (with notes and three hundred illustrations and maps) by J. Francon Williams - George Philip & Son, 1891.
  • The Geography of the British Colonies and Dependencies, physical and political by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, London, 1892. 4 English editions published between 1892 and 1907. 2 English editions published in 1892 and 1907.[92]
  • The Advanced Class-book of Modern Geography, Physical, Political, Commercial by J. Francon Williams and William Hughes – George Philip & Son, London, 1892. 3 English editions published in 1892, 1908 and 1910.[93]
  • Class-Book of Modern Geography by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1892.
  • Geography of Australasia and Polynesia by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1892.[94]
  • A Compendium of Modern Geography by William Hughes and John Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, London & Liverpool, 1893. 3 English editions published in 1893.[95]
  • An Elementary Class-Book of Modern Geography, with examination questions, by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, London, 1893.
  • An Introduction to the Study of Geography by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1893.[96]
  • Philips Graphic School Atlas, (series of 110 maps and diagrams) by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1895.[97][98]
  • The Geography of the British Isles, Physical, Political, Commercial by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1895.[99]
  • The Geography of Africa, Physical, Political and Commercial, by W. Hughes and J. Francon Williams - George Philip & Son, 1896.[100]
  • Philips’ Geographical Manuals with Maps and Diagrams by W. Hughes and J. Francon Williams - George Philip & Son, 1897.[101]
  • Pocket Gazetteer and Atlas of the World edited by J. Francon Williams, ‘Saxon’s Everybody’s Series,’ - Messrs. W.R. Russell & Co, 1899.[102]
  • Everybody's Gazetteer and Atlas of the World by John Francon Williams – W. R. Russell & Co., London, 1900 & 1910
  • Geography of America by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams – Philips' Geographical Manuals – George Philip & Son, 1906.
  • The Geography of the British Colonies and Dependencies: Physical–Political–Commercial by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams (new and revised edition) – George Philip and Son, London, 1907.
  • The Story of Alfred the Great for Young Folks by John Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, London (2012 Kindle edition)

References

  • Tooley's Dictionary of Mapmakers, revised edition Q–Z, edited by Valerie Scott, Early World Press 2004, p. 393, Williams, John Francon (entry).
  • 975 – Williams, J. F. 1898–1900, 1906–07, National Library of Scotland, Inventory, Acc. 10222 Bartholomew, Manuscripts Division, George and John George Bartholomew Archive.[103]
  • Torch and Colonial Book Circular, Volume 1, edited by Edward Augustus Petherick (1887-1888) publ. E.A. Petherick & Co, London (Book held in New York Public Library); References to J. Francon Williams are on pages 14, 55, 79, 157: [104]
  • Library of Congress: John Francon Williams: [105]

Sources

  1. ^ 1861 UK Census Richard Williams (aged 43), Mary Williams (aged 39) and their children, William (aged 18), John (aged 7), Mary (aged 4), Henry (aged 3), residing at Cenfaes Terrace, Llanllechid, (retrieved 12 February 2018, findmypast.co.uk)
  2. ^ 1871 UK Census Richard Williams (aged 54), Mary Williams (aged 49) and their children, John (aged 17), Mary (aged 14), Henry (aged 13), and Grace (aged 9) residing at Pencennant (Pen-y-ceunant), Llanllechid, (retrieved 12 February 2018, findmypast.co.uk)
  3. ^ Obscure Old English Occupations:http://www.worldthroughthelens.com/family-history/old-occupations.php (retrieved 12 February 2018)
  4. ^ Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales edited by Rev. John Marius Wilson (1870–72) published Edinburgh, A. Fullarton & Co.: [1].
  5. ^ 1876 Marriage Certificate: Marriage solemnized at the Parish Church in the Parish of St Giles, Northampton - 8 July 1876 - No. 29, between John Williams, School Master of Palmerston Road; father's name: Richard Williams (Overlooker at Slate Quarries), and Barbara Balmain Dougall; father's name John Dougall (manufacturer)
  6. ^ John B. Williams baptism certificate on familysearch.org: John B. Williams was baptized on 5 August 1877, Northampton.
  7. ^ http://www.ancestry.com – Liverpool, Lancashire, England, Baptisms 1813-1906 – Aeneas Francon Williams (son of John and Barbara Williams) baptized at St Peter’s Church, Liverpool, 20 July 1886.
  8. ^ Familysearch.org – Births, Marriages and Deaths, Cheshire Parish Registers, 1538-2000: David Dougall Williams was baptized on 22 July 1888 at St. Mary, Liscard, in Cheshire.
  9. ^ Familysearch.org – Births, Marriages and Deaths, Cheshire Parish Registers, 1538–2000: Margaret Mary Ann Williams was christened on 8 November 1891 at St Mary, Liscard, in Cheshire.
  10. ^ Baptism Register, George Stanley Williams, 25 May 1890, Ref: 5b – 103
  11. ^ 1891 UK Census, John Francon Williams and family, 2 Massey Park, Wallasey, Chester:[2].
  12. ^ 1881 UK Census Richard Williams (aged 63), Mary Williams (aged 59) and Grace (aged 19) residing at 17 Pencennant, Llanllechid, (retrieved 10 February, findmypast.co.uk)
  13. ^ FluTrackers: Flu Pandemic 1891 (retrieved 17 February 2018: 'The earliest signs of an epidemic revival on a large scale occurred in March 1891, in the United States and the north of England. In England it began in the Yorkshire towns, particularly in Hull, and also independently in South Wales. In London influenza became epidemic for the second time about the end of April, and soon afterwards was widely distributed in England and Wales. The large towns in the north, together with London and Wales, suffered much more heavily in mortality than in the previous attack. In 1891 it was very sudden and extremely severe, the death-rate rising to 73.4 during the month of April, and subsiding with equal rapidity. During the third quarter of the year, while Europe was free, the antipodes had their second attack, which was more severe than the first.' https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/welcome-to-the-scientific-library/pandemics-in-literature/21032-flu-pandemic-1889-1890
  14. ^ By May 1891, influenza was particularly prevalent in Liverpool, Birkenhead and Nottingham:The Evening Express, 7 May 1891, page 3 - The Influenza Epidemic (article) (retrieved 17 February 2018): A recrudescence in the UK in December 1891 lasted through mid-winter into 1892: http://newspapers.library.wales/view/3178721/3178724/46/LIVERPOOL
  15. ^ a b 1851 Census – page 5 – Dougall Family: http://www.dunning.uk.net/census/c51pdf.pdf
  16. ^ Journal of the Royal Geographical Society, vol. 50, publ. 1880: List of the Fellows of the Royal Geographical Society; The number of Fellows elected during the past year (ending April 30th, 1880) included, John Francon Williams Esq. c/o George Philip & Son, Caxton Buildings, Liverpool; https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet.dli.2015.70717/2015.70717.Journal-Of-The-Royal-Geographical-Society-Vol50_djvu.txt
  17. ^ Elected 13 March 1876 according to Archivist, Foyle Reading Room RGS-IBG
  18. ^ George Philip (biography), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press (retrieved 28 July 2017) http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/41112
  19. ^ An extract from Geography of the Oceans by J. Francon Williams, 1881: The Atlantic Ocean Navigation and Commerce: (retrieved 18 September 2017):http://gluedideas.com/Geography-of-the-Oceans-1881/The-Atlantic-Ocean-Navigation.html
  20. ^ Quote taken from Geography of the Oceans by John Francon Williams, publ. George Philip & Son (1881), XI – Action of the Sea on the Earth's Crust (Paragraph 149) pp. 109–10 [3]. Quoted in The Scotsman, 17 October 2017, p. 34 – Sea the Danger (retrieved 4 November 2017)
  21. ^ The Cornish Telegraph, Thursday 4 May 1882, p. 4 – Jottings From London (Column) The Geography of the Oceans, (book review).
  22. ^ The Daily Gazette for Middlesbrough, Friday 4 March 1881, p. 2 – Literary Notes – The Geography of the Oceans (review).
  23. ^ 1881 UK Census, West Derby, Lancashire, England. John and Barbara Williams. The Census states Barbara was born in Perthshire, Scotland.
  24. ^ Correspondence 9 May 2012, Archivist, Foyle Reading Room RGS-IBG.
  25. ^ BT51/4/5500 – Class 3: wood, bone, ivory etc. Registered design No 5500: registered by John Francon Williams, Editor, of 57 Bonsall Road, West Derby, near Liverpool, Lancashire, 21 April 1884. BT51/4/5499 – Class 3: wood, bone, ivory etc. Registered design No 5500: registered by John Francon Williams, Editor, of 57 Bonsall Road, West Derby, near Liverpool, Lancashire, 21 April 1884. Both patents are held at the National Archives, Kew. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C10163188 and :http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C10163189
  26. ^ Index of Patentees and Applicants, 1882-84, publ., The Commissioners of Patents’ Sales Dept. applicant John F. Williams, application No. 2974 (dated 15 June 1883) and 4505 (dated 21 September 1883) – The Picton Reading Room and Hornby Library Liverpool, book ref: 608 05 PAT
  27. ^ Index of Patentees and Applicants, 1882-84, publ., The Commissioners of Patents’ Sales Dept. applicant John F. Williams, application No. 2097 (dated 25 January 1884) and 9124 (dated 18 June 1884) – Picton Reading Room and Hornby Library Liverpool, book ref: 608 05 PAT
  28. ^ Index of Patentees and Applicants, 1885, publ., The Commissioners of Patents’ Sales Dept. applicant J. F. Williams, application No. 6447 – date 27 May 1885 – Picton Reading Room and Hornby Library Liverpool, book ref: 608 05 PAT
  29. ^ Liverpool Mercury, Wednesday 30 December 1885, p. 7 – Christmas Fete At The Liverpool Gymnasium (report) John Francon Williams attends.
  30. ^ Leeds Mercury, Wednesday 13 July 1887, p. 9 – Literature – Philip's Handy Volume Atlas of the World (book review)
  31. ^ Liverpool Mercury, Wednesday 15 June 1887, p. 7. Philip's Handy Volume Atlas of the World by J. Francon Williams (review)
  32. ^ West London Observer, Saturday 23 July 1887, p. 5 – Philips' Handy Volume and Atlas of the World (review).
  33. ^ National Library Scotland – Map Division, 159 Causewayside, Edinburgh, EH9 1PH: J. F. Williams folder containing original hand-written letters by John Francon Williams dating from 1888–1900 & 1906–1907, in the John George Bartholomew archive.
  34. ^ Stories Illustrated, a monthly magazine founded and edited by J. Francon Williams, London 1887/88 British Library archive, System number 002854273, General Reference Collection P.P.6018.fea. Vol. I, no. 1-7:http://explore.bl.uk/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=moreTab&ct=display&fn=search&doc=BLL01002854273&indx=1&recIds=BLL01002854273&recIdxs=0&elementId=0&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&frbrVersion=&frbg=&&vl(488279563UI0)=any&dscnt=0&scp.scps=scope%3A%28BLCONTENT%29&tb=t&vid=BLVU1&mode=Basic&srt=rank&tab=local_tab&dum=true&vl(freeText0)=stories%20Illustrated%20J.%20Francon%20Williams&dstmp=1516996588750
  35. ^ Illustrated London News, Saturday 18 August 1888, page 191 – Messrs. Philips’ Miniature Atlases – A Handy-Volume Atlas of Australasia and A Handy-Volume Atlas of British America (book review) 2 books (retrieved 18 January 2018)
  36. ^ Early American Textbooks 1775-1900 by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement US Department of Education - John Francon Williams, pages 174 & 175 lists the John Francon Williams books that became part of the American School Curriculum: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.872.2900&rep=rep1&type=pdf
  37. ^ Report of the Commissioners, publ. Warwick Bros. & Rutter, Toronto, 1898, page 19 – Copy of the letter from John Francon Williams to Hon. George William Ross and a reply acknowledging receipt from Ross’s secretary, Alex Marling https://archive.org/stream/questionpricomm00onta#page/18/mode/2up/search/Francon+Williams
  38. ^ Philips' Handy-volume Atlas of the British Empire, by J. Francon Williams, published 1881: The Royal Collection Trust (RCIN – 1046816) (retrieved 22 August 2017): Provenance: Presented to King Edward VII when Prince of Wales, by the author, Nov. 1889: https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/1046816/philips-handy-volume-atlas-of-the-british-empire-with-complete-index-notes-by-j.
  39. ^ The Seaman’s Medical Guide, by Archibald Finlay, 1891, page 217, publ. George Philip & Son – Philips’ Series of Map-Drawing Books with Instructions by J. Francon Williams, 1891: https://archive.org/details/b20405650?q=Francon+williams
  40. ^ The Seaman’s Medical Guide, by Archibald Finlay, 1891, page 217, publ. George Philip & Son – Philips’ Grammar School Atlases No. 1, No. 2 & No. 3, edited by J. Francon Williams, 1891: https://archive.org/details/b20405650?q=Francon+williams
  41. ^ The Seaman’s Medical Guide, by Archibald Finlay, 1891, page 225, publ. George Philip & Son - Philips’ Picturesque History of England by J. Francon Williams, 1891: https://archive.org/details/b20405650?q=Francon+williams
  42. ^ Preface in A Compendium of Modern Geography by William Hughes and J. Francon Williams, 1893, held in the archives at Central Library, William Brown Street, Liverpool L3 8EW: https://capitadiscovery.co.uk/liverpool/items/1028822?query=j.+francon+williams&resultsUri=items%3Fquery%3Dj.%2Bfrancon%2Bwilliams
  43. ^ George Philip 1888 Maps and John Francon Williams: Historyhttp://www.miniaturemaps.net/_webedit/uploaded-files/All%20Files/1851-1900/1888a%20Philip.pdf
  44. ^ 1891 UK Census, Wallasey, St Hilary, in Cheshire, England. The Williams family is living in Wallasey in Cheshire. John Francon Williams (aged 37)
  45. ^ New Brighton Electoral Division, Wallasey Polling District, 1896 – John Francon Williams, Balmain, Mount Pleasant Road.
  46. ^ Letter to John George Bartholomew from John Francon Williams, dated 17 November 1898, and addressed, Fairlight, Forest Avenue, Chingford, London – National Library Scotland – Map Division, 159 Causewayside, Edinburgh, EH91PH: J. F. Williams folder containing original hand-written letters by John Francon Williams dating from 1888–1900 & 1906–1907, in the John George Bartholomew archive.
  47. ^ Letter written by John Francon Williams, dated 23 January 1899, to his friend John Bartholomew, in which Williams talks of eldest son John, "who is much troubled with asthma and bronchitis."
  48. ^ Letter written by John Francon Williams, dated 28 January 1899, to his friend John George Bartholomew, in which Williams talks of setting up an Anglo-American Syndicate.
  49. ^ In a handwritten letter from Williams to John George Bartholomew dated 3 January 1899 held in the National Library of Scotland Williams mentions his commission for the atlas by the Mazawattee company
  50. ^ Then and Now: 1800–1900, Why This is the Most Wonderful Century in Time, article by J.F. Williams, article extracted from The Harmsworth Magazine. Volume 3 – The National Archives, reference: D/B/BRY/1/2/670, Date: 1900, Held at: Hackney Archives Department. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/12edb89a-d894-44f3-8719-16a03815534f.
  51. ^ Saloon Passenger List, SS Winifredian, Liverpool to Boston, ships Captain G.W. Muir, departing 20 July 1900 – John Francon Williams.
  52. ^ 1901 UK Census, Chingford, Essex, England: the Williams family are living in Chingford, Essex.
  53. ^ Register of Deaths: 1903, Deaths in the Parish of Clackmannan in the County of Clackmannanshire – p. 3, no. 8, Ann Balmain Dougall, aged 64, 17 March 1903 from breast cancer (retrieved 6 September 2017).
  54. ^ Register of Deaths: 1903, Deaths in the Parish of Clackmannan in the County of Clackmannanshire – page 3, no., 9, Margaret Dougall, aged 70, died 20 March 1903 (retrieved 6 September 2017)
  55. ^ Ann Balmain Dougall buried 21 March 1903 – the old cemetery, Clackmannan, section E lair no. 269 aged 64, no. 746, p. 502 in the burial register
  56. ^ Aeneas Dougall buried 24 March 1897 – the old cemetery, Clackmannan, section E lair no. 270, no. 433, p. 502 in the burial register
  57. ^ Passenger List, SS Etruria, Liverpool to New York, departing 19 March 1904 – John Francon Williams
  58. ^ On his death certificate J. F. Williams is recorded as an "Export Trade Specialist".
  59. ^ Register of Deaths: 1909, Deaths in the Parish of Clackmannan in the County of Clackmannanshire – p. 10, no. 30, Barbara Balmain Williams, aged 59, died 24 November 1909 from cancer of the liver (retrieved 6 September 2017).
  60. ^ Barbara Balmain Williams buried 27 November 1909 aged 59 – the old cemetery, Clackmannan, section E lair no. 270, no. 1103, p. 502 in the register.
  61. ^ The Dundee Courier, Tuesday 27 December 1910, p. 5 – Pathetic Scenes at Hawes Junction During Inquest on Victims of Express Disaster (report) – Clackmannan Gentleman's Providential Escape (retrieved 8 August 2017).
  62. ^ 1911 England Census, 25 St. Stephen's Road, Leicester – John Francon Williams (retrieved 27 January 2018)
  63. ^ 1911 UK Census, Leicestershire, England. John Francon Williams (aged 57)
  64. ^ Register of Deaths: 1911, Deaths in the Parish of Alloa in the County of Clackmannanshire – page 57, no., 171, John Francon Williams, aged 57, died 4 September 1911 from a brain haemorrhage (retrieved 6 September 2017).
  65. ^ John Francon Williams: http://www.worldcat.org/identities/viaf-93550164/
  66. ^ Regimental diary held at National Archives, Catalogue reference: WO 95/1773/2. Title: 12 Battalion The Royal Scots. Web link: http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C7352550.
  67. ^ Private John B. Williams (number 31107), Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) 12th Battalion, enlisted in Edinburgh, records held at [4]
  68. ^ Commonwealth War Graves Commission database. Missing in Action. Unknown grave. Listed on Tyne Cot Memorial. [5].
  69. ^ John Balmain Williams remembered (retrieved 18 September 2017): [6].
  70. ^ The Scottish National War Memorial, Hall of Honour, located in Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh. Royal Scots Memorial and Roll of Honour – John B. Williams, 12th Battalion, killed in action on 25 April 1918: [7].
  71. ^ John B. Williams, Tyne Cot Memorial located at West-Vlaanderen, Belgium, cemetery/memorial reference: panel 11 to 14 and 162: [8].
  72. ^ Iain Cameron Williams short biography on GoodReads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4751.Iain_Cameron_Williams
  73. ^ The Scotsman, 17 October 2017, pages 35&35 – Sea the Danger – Iain Cameron Williams, in highlighting the potential dangers plastic nurdles impose upon marine and human biology, makes reference to the book Geography of the Oceans written by his great-grandfather (retrieved 17 October 2017: [9].
  74. ^ Readings, Australia’s Independent Book Retailer: https://www.readings.com.au/history-of-readings
  75. ^ Readings (Australia): The Geography of the Oceans by John Francon Williams: https://www.readings.com.au/products/22801703/the-geography-of-the-oceans-physical-historical-and-descriptive
  76. ^ The Catalogue of the Royal Geographical Society (Containing the titles of all works up to December 1893), compiled by Hugh Robert Hill, publ. John Murray (1895), page 231 – J. Francon Williams, & J.F. Williams books held by the Royal Geographical Society
  77. ^ The Geography of the Oceans, physical, historical & descriptive by J. Francon Williams published 1881: The Royal Collection Trust (RCIN – 1046776) (retrieved 22 August 2017): https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/1046776/the-geography-of-the-oceans-physical-historical-descriptive-by-j-francon-williams
  78. ^ A Class-Book of Physical Geography ... New and Improved Edition, revised by J. Francon Williams, 1891: illustrations: [10].
  79. ^ The Athenaeum, 8 September 1883, No. 2915, page 294 – George Philip & Sons full-page advertisement for their geographical publications including several works by J. Francon Williams including Philip's Elementary Atlas and Geography, (retrieved 9 July 2018)
  80. ^ Library of Congress, US: https://catalog.loc.gov/vwebv/search?searchCode=LCCN&searchArg=02019559&searchType=1&permalink=y
  81. ^ Modern England: From the Accession of James I to the Present Time by J. Francon Williams, American Publication by Boston School Supply Company, Boston, Mass, 1884. Library of Congress, USA: https://www.loc.gov/resource/dcmsiabooks.modernenglandfro00will/?sp=7
  82. ^ Library of Congress, US: https://catalog.loc.gov/vwebv/search?searchCode=LCCN&searchArg=02019560&searchType=1&permalink=y
  83. ^ Library of Congress, US: [11].
  84. ^ Stories from English History by John Francon Williams (1884) – US Library of Congress Online Catalogue (retrieved 10 October 2017): [12].
  85. ^ A Class-Book of Modern Geography by J. Francon Williams, 1887 – British Library images of the book: [13].
  86. ^ The Queen's Jubilee Atlas of the British Empire by John Francon Williams: [14].
  87. ^ The Colonies and India (London), Saturday 28 February 1891, p. 23 – Philip's Handy-Volume Atlas of the British Empire (review) (retrieved 18 September 2017): [15].
  88. ^ Philip’s Handy-Volume Atlas of the World (with complete index and statistical notes) by J Francon Williams, published 1887: The Royal Collection Trust (RCIN – 1072789) (retrieved 22 August 2017): [16].
  89. ^ Philip's Handy Volume Atlas of Australasia by J. Francon Williams: [17].
  90. ^ Philips’ Graphic School Atlas by J. Francon Williams – George Philip & Son, 1890 (retrieved 01/02/2018): http://maps.library.utoronto.ca/cgi-bin/datainventory.pl?idnum=1481&display=full&title=Philips'+Graphic+school+atlas
  91. ^ The Guardian, 14 January 1891, p. 43 – Realistic Geography by J. Francon Williams (advertisement).
  92. ^ The Catalogue of the Royal Geographical Society (Containing the titles of all works up to December 1893), compiled by Hugh Robert Hill, publ. John Murray (1895), page 231 – J. Francon Williams, & J.F. Williams books held by the Royal Geographical Society
  93. ^ Scottish Geographical Magazine: Volume 8, 1892, issue 6, New Books: The Advanced Class‐book of Modern Geography, Physical – Political – Commercial by William Hughes, F.R.G.S., and J. Francon Williams, F.R.G.S. London: George Philip and Son, 1892. Pp. 818. Price 6s. (retrieved 18 September 2017):[18].
  94. ^ Scottish Geographical Magazine: Volume 8, 1892, issue 12, New Books: Philip's Geographical Manuals. The Geography of Australia and Polynesia, by J. Francon Williams, London: George Philip and Son, 1892 (retrieved 18 September 2017). [19].
  95. ^ Compendium of Modern Geography by William Hughes and John Francon Williams, 1893, Publ. George Philip & Son, London & Liverpool: Housed within the Reynolds Library and Reynolds Family records, Rochester Public Library, Rochester, New York: Catalogue reference, Geography, Travels, general Geography ref. 18, page 139: http://www.libraryweb.org/~digitized/books/Reynolds_Reference_Catalog_1898.pdf
  96. ^ Scottish Geographical Magazine: Volume 9, 1893, issue 10, New Books: An Introduction to the Study of Geography by William Hughes, FRGS, and J. Francon Williams, FRGS London: George Philip and Son, 1893. Pp. 100. Price 1s., (retrieved 18 September 2017): [20].
  97. ^ Philips Graphic School Atlas, (a series of 110 Maps and Diagrams) by J. Francon Williams FRGS. Published by George Philip & Son, 32 Fleet Street, London, 1895: [http://maps.library.utoronto.ca/datapub/digital/G_1020_P5/G_1020_P5.pdf
  98. ^ Philips Graphic School Atlas:http://maps.library.utoronto.ca/cgi-bin/files.pl?idnum=1481].
  99. ^ Scottish Geographical Magazine: Volume 11, 1895, issue 11: New Books: The Geography of the British Isles, Physical, Political, Commercial by William Hughes, and J. Francon Williams, London: George Philip and Son, N. D. Pp. 119–224. Price 1s. 6d. (retrieved 18 September 2017): [21].
  100. ^ Journal of the Manchester Geographical Society, Vol. XXVI, publ. Sherratt & Hughes, page 139 – Africa: The Geography of Africa (list of books)https://archive.org/stream/journamanl26mancuoft#page/138/mode/2up/search/Francon+williams
  101. ^ The Athenaeum Journal of Literature, Science, The Fine Arts, Music, 23 January 1897, page 101, George Philips & Son’s List:Philips’ Geographical Manuals with Maps and Diagrams
  102. ^ An announcement in the Publishers’ Circular and Booksellers’ Record, 23 September 1899, page 291: https://archive.org/details/britishbooks7118unse?q=Francon+williams
  103. ^ :https://www.nls.uk/catalogues/online/cnmi/inventories/acc10222.pdf
  104. ^ Torch and Colonial Book Circular, Volume 1, held at New York Public Library (retrieved 21 March 2018):https://books.google.ca/books?id=dxMSAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA79&lpg=PA79&dq=Torch+and+Colonial+Book+Circular+J.+Francon+Williams&source=bl&ots=XStu8CTAGh&sig=GIQrUOmUw-_4v7dgh_aNSF9N8Jc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjJhLWF6f3ZAhVBON8KHezQAGAQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=J.%20Francon%20Williams&f=false
  105. ^ https://www.loc.gov/books/?q=John+Francon+Williams

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