John Carreyrou

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John Carreyrou
Education Duke University, BA, 1994
Occupation Journalist
Notable credit(s) The Wall Street Journal

John Carreyrou is a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative French-American journalist with The Wall Street Journal. He has worked for the paper since 1999 and has been based in Brussels, Paris, and New York.

Career

Carreyrou graduated from Duke University in 1994 with a B.A. in political science and government.

After graduation, he joined the Dow Jones Newswires. In 1999 he joined The Wall Street Journal Europe at Brussels.[1] In 2001 he moved to Paris to cover French business and other topics such as terrorism. In 2003 he was appointed the deputy bureau chief for Southern Europe. He covered French politics and business, Spain and Portugal.[2] By 2008 he was the deputy bureau chief and later bureau chief of the health and science bureau in New York.[3]

In late 2015 Carreyrou began a series of investigative articles on Theranos, the blood-testing start-up founded by Elizabeth Holmes, that questioned its claim to be able to run a wide range of lab tests from a tiny sample of blood from a finger prick.[4][5][6]

Awards

In 2003, Carreyrou shared the Pulitzer Prize in Explanatory Reporting with a team of Wall Street Journal reporters for a series of stories that exposed corporate scandals in America.[7][8] Carreyrou co-authored the article Damage Control: How Messier Kept Cash Crisis at Vivendi Hidden for Months, published Oct. 31, 2002.[9]

In 2003, Carreyrou won the German Marshall Fund's Peter R. Weitz Junior Prize for excellence in reporting on European affairs for his detailed coverage of the downfall of Vivendi Universal SA and its chairman, Jean-Marie Messier.[10]

In 2004, Carreyrou shared the German Marshall Fund's Peter R. Weitz Senior Prize for excellence in reporting on European affairs with a team of six The Wall Street Journal journalists.[11] In the five-part series titled The Disintegration of the Trans-Atlantic Relationship over the Iraq War Carreyrou contributed the article In Normandy, U.S.-France Feud Cuts Deep.[12] Published on February 24, 2003, while Carreyrou was based in Paris, the article explored how France's Normandy region, site of the D-Day landings, was caught between gratitude for the U.S. role in World War II and France's opposition to war in Iraq.[13]

In 2015, Carreyrou shared the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting with a team of investigative reporters at The Wall Street Journal for "Medicare Unmasked," a project that forced the American government in 2014 to release important Medicare data kept secret for decades, and in a sweeping investigative series uncovered abuses that cost taxpayers billions.[14][15] Carreyrou co-authored four articles in the series: Taxpayers face big tab for unusual doctor billings,[16] A fast-growing medical lab tests anti-kickback law,[17] Doctor ‘self-referral’ thrives on legal loophole[18] and Sprawling medicare struggles to fight fraud.[19]

In 2016, Carreyrou received the 67th annual George Polk Awards in Journalism for Financial Reporting in 2015. His investigation of Theranos, Inc. "raised serious doubts about claims by the firm and its celebrated 31-year-old founder, Elizabeth Holmes".[20] According to Vanity Fair, "a damning report published in The Wall Street Journal had alleged that the company was, in effect, a sham."[21][22] Carreyrou wrote the report.[23][24] A book-length treatment titled Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup (2018)[25] won the Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award.[26] A film version is in the works starring Jennifer Lawrence, written by Vanessa Taylor, and directed by Adam McKay.[27]

Personal

John Carreyrou was born to French journalist Gérard Carreyrou. His mother is American. He grew up in France.[28] He currently lives in Brooklyn with his wife and three children.[29]

References

  1. ^ John Carreyrou (Dec 6, 1999). "Belgians Dole Out $1 Million to Pay For Wedding of Their Future King". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  2. ^ "John Carreyrou New Deputy Bureau Chief for Southern Europe". Dow Jones Newswires. Feb 14, 2003. Archived from the original on 2005-05-16. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  3. ^ "2008 SABEW Conference Program" (PDF). SABEW. 2008. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  4. ^ James B. Stewart (Oct 29, 2015). "The Narrative Frays for Theranos and Elizabeth Holmes". The New York Times. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  5. ^ John Carreyrou (Oct 16, 2015). "Hot Startup Theranos Has Struggled With Its Blood-Test Technology". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  6. ^ John Carreyrou (Dec 27, 2015). "At Theranos, Many Strategies and Snags". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  7. ^ "Wall Street Journal Wins Pulitzer For Series on Corporate Scandals". The Wall Street Journal. Apr 7, 2003. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  8. ^ "Pulitzer Prize Winners". The Pulitzer Prizes – Columbia University. 2003. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016. 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting: Staff of The Wall Street Journal. For its clear, concise and comprehensive stories that illuminated the roots, significance and impact of corporate scandals in America. (Moved by the jury from the Public Service category.)
  9. ^ John Carreyrou and Martin Peers (Oct 31, 2002). "Damage Control: How Messier Kept Cash Crisis at Vivendi Hidden for Months". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  10. ^ "Annual Report 2003" (PDF). The German Marshall Fund of the United States. 2003. p. 8. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016. Peter R. Weitz Journalism Prizes. GMF awards two prizes annually for excellence in reporting on European and transatlantic affairs. A team of writers from BusinessWeek, led by David Fairlamb and John Rossant, were awarded the 2003 senior Peter R. Weitz Journalism Prize of $10,000 for their in-depth coverage of the expansion of the European Union to include countries of Central and Eastern Europe. The junior prize of $5,000 was awarded to The Wall Street Journal’s John Carreyrou for his detailed coverage of the downfall of Vivendi Universal SA and its chairman, Jean-Marie Messier.
  11. ^ "2004 Peter R. Weitz Senior Prize" (PDF). The Wall Street Journal. The German Marshall Fund of the United States. 2004. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  12. ^ John Carreyrou (Feb 24, 2003). "In Normandy, U.S.-France Feud Cuts Deep". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  13. ^ "Journal Reporters Win Prize For European Affairs Coverage". The Wall Street Journal. Oct 1, 2004. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  14. ^ "Pulitzer Prize Winners". The Pulitzer Prizes – Columbia University. 2015. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016. 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting: Eric Lipton of The New York Times For reporting that showed how the influence of lobbyists can sway congressional leaders and state attorneys general, slanting justice toward the wealthy and connected. & The Wall Street Journal Staff For "Medicare Unmasked," a pioneering project that gave Americans unprecedented access to previously confidential data on the motivations and practices of their health care providers.
  15. ^ Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg (Apr 20, 2015). "Wall Street Journal Wins Investigative Pulitzer". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  16. ^ John Carreyrou, Christopher S. Stewart and Rob Barry (June 10, 2014). "Taxpayers face big tab for unusual doctor billings". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  17. ^ John Carreyrou and Tom McGinty (September 8, 2014). "A fast-growing medical lab tests anti-kickback law". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  18. ^ John Carreyrou And Janet Adamy (October 23, 2014). "Doctor 'self-referral' thrives on legal loophole". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  19. ^ John Carreyrou And Christopher S. Stewart (December 26, 2014). "Sprawling medicare struggles to fight fraud". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  20. ^ "Long Island University Announces 67th Annual George Polk Awards in Journalism". Long Island University. Feb 14, 2016. Retrieved Feb 20, 2016. The award for Financial Reporting will go to John Carreyrou of The Wall Street Journal whose investigation of Theranos, Inc. raised serious doubts about claims by the firm and its celebrated 31-year-old founder, Elizabeth Holmes, that its new procedure for drawing and testing blood was a transformational medical breakthrough in wide use at the firm’s labs. Carreyrou’s well-researched stories, reported in the face of threats of lawsuits and efforts to pressure some sources to back off of their accounts, led to a reevaluation of Theranos’ prospects among investors and have been followed by regulatory actions against the company and widespread discussion that publications and institutions from Fortune and The New Yorker to Harvard and the White House may have been too quick to hail Holmes, a Stanford dropout whose personal wealth at the height of her startup’s rise was an estimated $4.5 billion, as a success story in the tradition of Steve Jobs, Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg.
  21. ^ Bilton, Nick. "Exclusive: How Elizabeth Holmes's House of Cards Came Tumbling Down". The Hive. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  22. ^ Carreyrou, John (2015-10-16). "Hot Startup Theranos Has Struggled With Its Blood-Test Technology". The Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  23. ^ Bilton, Nick. "Exclusive: How Elizabeth Holmes's House of Cards Came Tumbling Down". The Hive. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  24. ^ Carreyrou, John (2015-10-16). "Hot Startup Theranos Has Struggled With Its Blood-Test Technology". The Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  25. ^ "How One Company Scammed Silicon Valley. And How It Got Caught". The New York Times. 2018-05-21. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-05-22.
  26. ^ Andrew Hill (November 12, 2018). "'Bad Blood' wins the FT and McKinsey Business Book of 2018". Financial Times. Retrieved November 12, 2018.
  27. ^ McNary, Dave (June 23, 2016). "Legendary Wins Bidding War for Jennifer Lawrence Movie 'Bad Blood'". Variety. Archived from the original on 2016-06-25. Retrieved 23 July 2018.
  28. ^ Emmanuel Saint-Martin (Apr 21, 2015). "Un Français reçoit le Prix Pulitzer". French Morning. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.
  29. ^ "2014 IRE Conference – Event: Finding stories in Medicare's vast data trove". Investigative Reporters & Editors, Missouri School of Journalism. Jun 27, 2015. Retrieved Jan 31, 2016.

External links

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