Jim Richards (racing driver)

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Jim Richards
Jim Richards.jpg
Richards in 2011
Nationality New Zealand
Born (1947-09-02) 2 September 1947 (age 71)
Otahuhu
Related to Steven Richards (son)
Touring Car Masters
Years active 2008–16
Teams Jim Richards Racing
Car no. 2
Best finish 1st in 2010, 2013
Previous series
1976–1980
1977, 1980–1995
1994–1996, 1999
1995–1999
1996
1999–2006
2001–2003
2003–2006
2009
Australian Sports Sedan Ch.
Australian Touring Car
Australian GT Production
Australian Super Touring
NASCAR Australia
V8 Supercar
Australian Nations Cup
Carrera Cup Australia
Australian GT
Championship titles
1985
1985
1986
1987
1990
1991
1995
1996
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2010
2013
Australian Touring Car
Australian Endurance Champ.
Australian Endurance Champ.
Australian Touring Car
Australian Touring Car
Australian Touring Car
Australian GT Production
NASCAR Australia
Australian GT Production
Australian Nations Cup
Australian Nations Cup
Australian Nations Cup
Carrera Cup Australia
Touring Car Masters
Touring Car Masters
Awards
2006 V8 Supercars Hall of Fame

Jim Richards (born 2 September 1947) is a New Zealand racing driver who, after racing success in his home country, went on to further titles in Australia. While now retired from professional racing, Richards continues to compete in the Touring Car Masters series.

He was inducted into the New Zealand Motor-racing Hall of Fame in 1994[1] After a record number of starts and seven victories in the Bathurst 1000, and four Australian Touring Car Championships, Richards was inducted into the V8 Supercars Hall of Fame in 2006[2] and the Australian Motorsports Hall of Fame in 2015. He is the father of racing driver Steven Richards, and between them they have achieved 11 Bathurst 1000 wins, most recently in 2015.

Racing Career (New Zealand)

Jim Richards grew up in South Auckland. He left school at 16 to start a mechanic’s apprenticeship. This was at Speedway Auto Services, a garage in Manurewa owned by Brian Yates, who was at the time, one of the top midget-racers in New Zealand. By then Richards had already had success in junior go-karts in a kart made by his father.[3] At 18 he bought his first car, on hire-purchase: a Ford Anglia 105E, a car known for mechanical reliability that he could get into racing and still drive to work.[4] In his first race, at Pukekohe, coming last he managed to crash after the end of the race (albeit a minor one).[4] Painted in distinctive red with yellow trim and the number ‘105’, that was to become synonymous with his cars in NZ racing, he used the car for two seasons all across the country: in race meetings, hill-climbs and rally-sprints. He then upgraded to a similar, but race-proven and more modified, Anglia becoming his first proper racing-car. In 1968, now working as a mechanic at Barry Pointon Motors, he bought one of the newly popular Mark I Ford Escorts. Although that car’s 1300cc engine was underpowered, it further allowed Richard to improve his race-craft.[5] But in 1969, it was the patronage of amateur racer and fellow competitor, Jim Carney, that allowed him to upgrade to his first truly competitive car: a Ford Escort with a new high-performance 1600cc BDA twin-cam engine, capable of 140 bhp. The combination of Richards as driver and mechanic, Carney with the funding, and Murray Bunn with reconditioning and tuning expertise, started to produce a number of victories. In 1970 Carney purchased the Ford Escort TC that had taken Mike Crabtree to win that year’s British Touring Car Championship for the John Willment Group and this car established Richards as a top racer. Rushed straight off the boat, still in its original livery, he won with it first time out and then went on to win the class championship that year, and again in the following 1971-72 season.[6] By now in popular demand, he would often also race the Escort in the open-class as well, taking on and beating the V8 Mustangs, Camaros and Firebirds.[6] He would also enter his tow-car, a Holden Monaro, in production races, as well as racing in the small class with a Hillman Imp owned by local driver Brian Patrick. It was the latter partnership that first got the sponsorship of the NZ division of Sidchrome – an Australian tool manufacturer – the major financial connection for the next decade.[7]

During this time, as in neighbouring Australia, big-engine production car racing was entering a golden age and drawing big crowds. Competitive cars included, from Holden, the HQ Monaro, and new Torana GTR XU-1; versus the Ford Falcon GT-HO and Chrysler Charger. Richards initially raced a Monaro for major Auckland car-dealer (and his new employer) Jerry Clayton. In 1971 he was regularly battling with Robbie Francevic in the Team McMillan Ford Falcon GT-HO. In the next season’s Castrol GTX Championship the two drivers swapped teams. Richards won the 72-73 championship in the Team McMillan GT-HO, with Murray Bunn still doing the engine-preparation. In the following season, his main competition would be from Neville Crichton in a 350 Monaro. For the 73-74 season, Richards and Carney had arranged to buy the John Fitzpatrick Ford Escort (with an 1800cc BDA engine) competing in the British championship to take on the big V8s. However, it was wrecked in the one of the last races and the deal fell through. Instead he and Murray Bunn set up building up a Ford Mustang at a remote farmstead out of Auckland. Sponsored by Sidchrome in red and yellow, it was fitted with the hitherto unreliable, but powerful, Cleveland 351 V8 engine and extra-wide rear tyres. Initially unsuccessful, after its teething troubles were resolved it was impressive enough to win Richards the 73-74 Saloon Car Championship.[8] Changing jobs to work for Sidchrome gave Richards time during the week to work on the car during the next season. In an exciting and close 74-75 championship (including success in a Trans-Tasman series against some of Australia’s best drivers) he was narrowly pipped for the championship by Paul Fahey in his ex-European works Ford Capri Cologne V6.[9]

Richards was also having success in endurance racing. The traditional season opener in October was the Benson & Hedges 500 – a 500-mile / 6-hour race run into the night for stock-standard production cars. He won the event in both 1971 and 1972 co-driving with friend and racing rival, Rod Coppins, in a Chrysler Charger.[10] When Coppins wanted to upgrade his choice of car for the 74-75 racing season he decided to pick up a new Holden Torana L34 from the factory in Melbourne. Together he and Jim took it to the 1974 Hardie-Ferodo 1000 for its first race. Racing regulations were moving closer to the Australian Group C rules at the time and marked the demise of the standard production-car racing. Driving a McMillan-Ford Falcon XA in the 74-75 GTX season Richards was unbeatable, winning an unprecedented 17 consecutive wins. His final two races were in the 1975 winter-season co-driving Neville Crichton’s Chevrolet Camaro with a win in his last race in New Zealand for some time.

From early in his racing career he had also tried rallying, as the schedules did not conflict with the track-racing season. One of the very first formal racing rallies in New Zealand was the 1968 Shell Silver Fern Rally. Richards entered with Jim Carney as co-driver.[11] In the following year’s inaugural Heatway Rally he drove a new Triumph 2.5 PI with Carney’s wife, Mary, as co-driver. After being one of the leaders the gearbox broke, leaving him with only top gear and finishing down the field. Recognising his talent, for the following year’s Heatway, Leyland-New Zealand offered him and Jim Carney a team Morris Marina alongside works driver Andrew Cowan. As expected the suspension was not strong enough and after initially running second behind Cowan he finished mid-field.[11]

In 1973, the Heatway Rally attracted several of the works teams running in the inaugural World Rally Championship, although it was not itself a championship event. Ford offered him a ride as the 3rd driver in their works team alongside rising star Hannu Mikkola and NZ champion Mike Marshall running Ford Escort RS1600s. Richards was running second to Mikkola going into the first mountain stage. Having never driven on ice before his car caught an icy patch in the middle of the night and slid wide off the road and rolled down a bank for 100 metres. He and co-driver Richard Halls were very lucky that they came to rest on a narrow outcrop before tumbling over a deeper gorge. They were hauled out at dawn, and with surprisingly little damage were able to resume the rally, albeit out of contention.[11] Thereafter he was consistently quicker than Mikkola, who had a comfortable race-lead and had eased off. The rally ended with a tarmac stage at Pukekohe, where Richards was back on very familiar territory.

In the early ‘70s he had also had success doing guest spots on the speedway tracks. But at the end of the 1974-75 racing season, with the opposition getting more professional, he needed to make a choice on one form or motor-racing – racetrack, rallying or speedway – to concentrate on.[12] The decision was made to move across to the more lucrative Australian racing scene.

Racing Career (Australia)

Richards first made his mark in Australia at the 1974 Hardie-Ferodo 1000 with a masterful display of wet weather driving during the race, recording lap times fifteen seconds faster than the leaders in the latter part of the event while driving a V8 Holden LH Torana SL/R 5000 with fellow Kiwi Rod Coppins. Driving with essentially standard showroom kit, by the end, their front brakes were gone, but through attrition finished a very credible third place, five laps behind the winner John Goss.[13] This and other wet weather drives over his career gave Richards the reputation of being a 'rainmaster' , and he was called the “web-footed Kiwi”,[14] Many Australians humorously attributed it to living in rainy New Zealand, though Richards himself believes it was more from the car control he learned early in his career doing dirt track speedway.

In mid-1975 Richards moved to Australia. With Sidchrome-NZ ending its sponsorship, a deal was arranged with the Australian parent company to pick up the sponsorship for a tilt at the Australian season.[9] Arriving unannounced in Melbourne just days before the first round at Sandown in July, despite minimal preparation time, he won both races at the meet in pouring rain. After this sensational start, he was immediately a popular choice for race promoters to pay appearance money to bring the Kiwi Mustang to take on Australia’s best. Originally intending to commute across from Auckland for the races, after two very successful months he made the decision to move to Melbourne with his wife and two young boys to pursue a professional racing career.[15] Through 1975 from 30 starts, he achieved 27 podiums including 13 wins.[16] For Bathurst he re-joined Rod Coppins in his Holden Torana, finishing 9th after gearbox issues.[17]

1976 saw the inaugural Australian Sports Sedan Championship and many drivers upgraded their machinery. However, Richards stuck with the Sidchrome Mustang – now showing its age. Wins were less frequent, however, the late-season arrival of Frank Gardner’s all-conquering Chevrolet Corvair helped to limit his opposition getting too many points. Allan Moffat won the series but Richards did get a big payday winning the $100 000 Marlboro sports sedan finals at Calder Park Raceway. In October he was co-driver for John Goss at Bathurst. He outmuscled the HDT polesitter to lead the race after the first corner, but a broken clutch soon stopped the challenge and they ended up finishing 29th. At the end of the year he was invited by Dick Johnson to drive his Torana XU1 in the Brisbane round of the Touring Car series, getting his first Touring Car victory.[17]

With the Mustang now obsolete, and Sidchrome’s sponsorship ended, Richards moved across to the Australian Touring Car Championship. Ford provided a Ford Falcon chassis to prepare. However, it proved difficult to get it competitive and as money dried up, the shell was successively leased mid-year to Goss and Johnson whose own cars had been wrecked in accidents. With sponsorship from Melbourne’s Melford Motors, Richards debuted the Falcon in September at Sandown, and then onto October’s Bathurst race as a privateer with Coppins now as his co-driver. Although fast, the engine proved fragile and unreliable. Suddenly though at the end of the season, after a change of ownership, Melford pulled its sponsorship.[17]


Then in 1978 Richards began a successful stint at the Holden Dealer Team as Peter Brock's co-driver at Bathurst, netting Richards three Bathurst 1000 titles in a row. This was the first time a driver combination had done three-in-a-row at Bathurst. It changed the course of the race into a 6-hour sprint race where the co-driver now had to be as skilled and quick as the lead driver.[17] Brock later recalled that, at the time, he only knew Richards as a casual acquaintance and fellow driver, but after the Wanneroo Park round of the 1978 Australian Touring Car Championship, the pair shared a Ford Falcon panel van for the drive from Perth back to Melbourne (which they allegedly covered in approximately 24 hours for what is normally a 2-3 day trip). Upon returning home to Melbourne, Brock suggested Richards for the job of his co-driver for that years Hardie-Ferodo 1000 at Bathurst. He was hired by HDT team manager John Shepherd, who knew Richards in Melbourne. Together, Brock and Richards drover the perfect, trouble-free race to win Bathurst in 1978 after starting from pole position.

The following year, in 1979 the pair had an even more dominant win, with a record-breaking six-lap margin to their nearest rivals. Just after taking over the car Richards had to drive through treacherous conditions with half the track wet and half dry.[13] He and Brock subsequently took the car back to New Zealand for the end-of-year summer series.[18] For the 1980 race, Brock was now leader of the Holden Dealer Team, in the first year of the new Holden Commodore. Early on in the race, Brock made an uncharacteristic error colliding with a back-marker while lapping it. After a strong comeback drive Brock got back into the lead before handing over to Richards who then drove matching lap-times to take a hard-fought third win.[13] “We didn’t know what was going to happen, so we just had to go flat stick. Our times were virtually the same. I actually had the fastest lap of the race until Brockie went out in his last stint and knocked me off by a tenth of a second”.[13]

The Mustang was outclassed by the end of 1976 and Richards and Bunn had planned to replace it with the new Ford Falcon. However ongoing delays meant it did not makes its debut until the start of the 1978 season at Surfers Paradise in May. Allan Grice had bought the Corvair from Gardner who had retired. Richards and Grice battled all season, ending on equal points but Grice won the championship on a countback. The following year mechanical unreliability meant he finished a distant second to Grice’s Corvair.[19]

The late’70s marked a decline in Australasian motorsports with most drivers stretched for finance. Richards took up a Bob Jane T-Mart’s franchise in Preston, Melbourne to provide a regular income, and a degree of sponsorship. It was also during this time he tried racing in F5000 single-seaters as well as the Barclays TR7 Procar single-marque series.[19]

In 1981, Richards bought the Falcon off Bob Jane but although competitive it was getting increasingly unreliable. With new GT regulations coming into force for 1982, it would be too expensive to make it eligible, so it was retired to his T-Mart’s foyer while up for sale.[19]


In February 1982, Richards was hired by Frank Gardner, team manager of the new JPS Team BMW, as the teams lead driver to drive the BMW 635 CSi. The team knew results under the locally developed Group C regulations would be very hard against the local Holdens and Fords, and never won a race from 1982 to 1984. Plans to switch to the more competitive M535is, with its far better power-to-weight ratio, were stymied because insufficient numbers had been manufactured by the company.

As Richards commented: “It was more or less known between Frank and I that if the car was good enough to win when I’m driving it well, then it would win. I always knew the preparation was perfect whether the car was coming tenth or first.” “I wasn’t disappointed, sorry for myself, because I don’t when I don’t win races. It was the guys I felt for, because the incredible amount of work you put in is the same whether you run first or last.” It was a positive attitude matched by the BMW motorsport management and the sponsors that was prepared to wait for the results.[20]

Meanwhile, the Sports Sedan series had been replaced by the GT championship, running to Group 5/IMSA GT rules. The JPS Team BMW entered a turbo-charged 318i for Richards. It was up against Porsche 935s, Holden LX Torana, and an Alfa Romeo Alfetta GTV amongst others. 1982 was a learning curve, ending with a surprise pole position in the final race. But going into the 1983 season everything changed. The small and nimble BMW had a much better power-to-weight ratio and won the first two rounds, giving the new JPS team its first victories. But a spectacular televised crash at the start of the next round at Adelaide between Brock, Richards and Tony Hubbard (in Richards’ old Falcon) put the BMW on its side and left it very badly damaged and ending Richards’ championship.[21] However, the two victories were sufficient to give him second equal in the final standings.[22]

For the 1982 Bathurst race, Richards had British veteran David Hobbs as co-driver (Hobbs had raced with Gardner in his first Le Mans in 1962, winning their class). They finished a creditable 5th, 6 laps behind winners Peter Brock / Larry Perkins, and first non-V8 home. In the 1983 race the car was updated with new Group A engine components from Germany. Now developing 390 bhp the team was encouraged after a 2nd at the immediately preceding Castrol 400 at Sandown, behind Allan Moffat’s Mazda RX-7. Richards (co-driven by Gardner himself) qualified fourth on the grid but fuel –contamination issues immediately affected the car, retiring on the 6th lap. Conspiracy theories swirled in the papers about sabotage but nothing was proven. Reliability however meant Richards finished second in the Endurance Championship.[20]

However when Australian touring car racing changed to the international Group A regulations in 1985, the BMW was suddenly a frequent race winner. International rules removed any bias to any manufacturers and kept the cars far closer to production trim. The car sat lower and had far better weight distribution so it was easier on tyres than the previous Group C counterpart. Richards easily won the 1985 Australian Touring Car Championship getting on the podium in 9 of the 10 rounds, and winning 7 of them. He also won the 1985 Australian Endurance Championship with four wins out of five. However, the big one, at Bathurst, eluded him.

That race was a triumph of the European entrants with the Jaguar XJ-S’s of Tom Walkinshaw Racing first and third split by the Schnitzer Motorsport BMW. After leading in the early stages, because of better fuel mileage than the Jaguars, the JPS team’s race was undone by oil on the track that put both team cars into the same sandtrap losing them four laps. Despite making back a lap he and up-and-coming co-driver Tony Longhurst could only manage 4th albeit first local entry home.[23]

In recognition of his dominant season and remarkable turnaround, BMW announced Richards as their driver of the year with the 1985 BMW Achievement Award at a formal ceremony in Munich. Richards himself said “At Bathurst it brought it home to me. Like our car was not just a little bit quicker, but a lot quicker than the Schnitzer car and that was the best car they could muster for there. I reckon we had the best BMW that could be fielded anywhere in the world”.[23]

In 1986 the dominance of the JPS team was overtaken as other teams developed their cars. The championship was won by fellow-Kiwi Robbie Francevic in the Volvo 240T turbo. Richards finished third in the championship with just a single victory.

The 635 CSi was replaced by the smaller capacity BMW M3 in 1987, and Richards would again come to the fore, winning the 1987 Australian Touring Car Championship. Gardner shut down the JPS team at the end of 1987, and Richards re-joined Peter Brock's team for 1988, with the old HDT now running the BMW M3s after spending the previous 19 years racing Holdens. By 1988, however, the M3 itself had been overtaken as the car to have by the all-powerful Ford Sierra RS500. At the end of the year, Brock's team decided to race Sierras in 1989 while Richards was snapped up by Fred Gibson to race for his factory-backed Nissan team.


Driving for Nissan, Richards won his third ATCC in 1990 driving both the Nissan Skyline HR31 GTS-R and the mighty 4WD, twin-turbo R32 GT-R, affectionately known as "Godzilla". He would repeat as champion in 1991, finishing the ATCC ahead of his young teammate Mark Skaife. Skaife then put the GT-R on pole position at the 1991 Bathurst, before he and Richards cruised to victory in race record time, a lap ahead of the Holden Commodore of defending race winners Win Percy and Allan Grice.

Richards finished second to Skaife in the 1992 ATCC, before the pair then won their second straight Bathurst 1000 in a crash-shortened race which saw Richards crash the GT-R in a downpour on lap 145. However, as there had been a separate crash on that same lap (which Richards later became a part of while trying to drive back to the pits), the red flag was shown and the race was declared. As the rules state that the results would be from the previous lap, this saw a surprised Richards and Skaife declared race winners. On a personal note, the 1992 Tooheys 1000 was also a sad occasion for Richards when his longtime friend and former JPS BMW teammate, 1967 F1 World Champion Denny Hulme died at the wheel of his BMW M3 on lap 32 after suffering a heart attack.

Richards was only informed of Hulme's passing just before he and Skaife took to the podium as winners, and as the unruly crowd below booed the pair (they wanted the second-placed Sierra of Dick Johnson and John Bowe declared winners as they did not like a Japanese car dominating as the GT-R did), the normally gentlemanly Richards let fly with his now famous speech:[24]

His other Australian title wins were:

  • 1985 Australian Endurance Championship in a BMW 635 CSi
  • 1985 AMSCAR Series in a BMW 635 CSi
  • 1986 Australian Endurance Championship in a BMW 635 CSi
  • 1992 AMSCAR Series in a Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R
  • 1995 Australian GT Production Car Series in a Porsche 993 RSCS
  • 1996 Australian NASCAR Championship
  • 1999 Australian GT Production Car Championship in a Porsche 996 GT3
  • 2000 Australian Nations Cup Championship in a Porsche 996 GT3
  • 2001 Australian Nations Cup Championship in a Porsche 996 GT3
  • 2002 Australian Nations Cup Championship in a Porsche 996 GT3
  • 2003 Australian Carrera Cup Championship in a Porsche 996 GT3 Cup

His Bathurst wins have been:

He has also won the Sandown 500 in 1985 with Tony Longhurst in a BMW 635 CSi, and again in 1989 with Mark Skaife in a Nissan Skyline HR31 GTS-R.

Recently, Richards has driven in the Targa Tasmania as well as numerous other tarmac rallies in the Australian Targa Championship and other tarmac rallies, driving for Porsche. Partnering Richards as a navigator has been motor racing journalist and commentator Barry Oliver. The pairing of Richards and Oliver (affectionately known as Team Grandpa in later years) have together won the Targa Tasmania a record 8 times. Richards and Oliver made their debut in Targa in 1993 in a Porsche 968 CS.[25] His final victory saw him become only the fourth winner of the event in a two-wheel-drive car, and is the last person to do so, holding off more fancied four-wheel-drive rivals over a wet Day 5 to win his last Targa Tasmania title.

Targa Tasmania wins:

Career results

Richards drove a BMW 635 CSi in the Group C Touring Car category from 1982 to 1984
Jim Richards and Barry Oliver competing in the 2005 Targa Tasmania
Richards won the 2010 Touring Car Masters at the wheels of a 1964 Ford Falcon Sprint
Richards placed second in the 2012 Touring Car Masters with an AMC Javelin AMX
Season Series Position Car Team
1972 New Zealand Unlimited Saloon Championship 1st Ford Falcon GT
1974 New Zealand Saloon Championship 1st Ford Mustang Sidchrome
1974 New Zealand Unlimited Saloon Championship 1st Ford Falcon GT
1975 New Zealand Unlimited Saloon Championship 1st Ford Falcon GT Sidchrome
1976 Australian Sports Sedan Championship 4th Ford Mustang Sidchrome
1976 Marlboro Sports Sedan Series 1st [26] Ford Mustang [26] Sidchrome [26]
1977 Australian Sports Sedan Championship 4th Ford Mustang Jim Richards
1977 Australian Touring Car Championship 13th Ford XB Falcon GT
1978 Australian Sports Sedan Championship 2nd Ford XC Falcon Jim Richards Motor Racing
1979 Rothmans International Series 11th Matich A53 Repco Holden Jim Richards
1979 Australian Sports Sedan Championship 2nd Ford XC Falcon
Chrysler VH Valiant Charger
Chevrolet Monza
Jim Richards Motor Racing
Clem Smith
Rotax Monza
1980 Australian Sports Sedan Championship 3rd Ford XC Falcon Jim Richards
1982 Australian Touring Car Championship 22nd BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1982 Better Brakes AMSCAR Series 9th BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1982 Australian Endurance Championship 36th BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1982 Australian GT Championship 13th BMW 318i turbo JPS Team BMW
1983 Australian Endurance Championship 2nd BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1983 Australian GT Championship 2nd BMW 318i turbo JPS Team BMW
1984 Australian Touring Car Championship 5th BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1984 Better Brakes AMSCAR Series 3rd BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1984 Australian Endurance Championship NC BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1984 World Sportscar Championship NC BMW 320i JPS Team BMW
1985 Australian Touring Car Championship 1st BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1985 Australian Endurance Championship 1st BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1986 Australian Touring Car Championship 3rd BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1986 Better Brakes/AMSCAR Series 3rd BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1986 Australian Endurance Championship 1st BMW 635 CSi JPS Team BMW
1987 Australian Touring Car Championship 1st BMW M3 JPS Team BMW
1987/88 Australian Superspeedway Series (AUSCAR) 1st Ford XF Falcon Stillwell Ford
1988 Australian Touring Car Championship 4th BMW M3 Mobil 1 Racing
1988 Asia-Pacific Touring Car Championship NC BMW M3 Mobil 1 Racing
1989 Australian Touring Car Championship 4th Nissan Skyline HR31 GTS-R Nissan Motorsport Australia
1990 Australian Touring Car Championship 1st Nissan Skyline HR31 GTS-R
Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R
Nissan Motorsport Australia
1991 Australian Touring Car Championship 1st Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R Nissan Motorsport Australia
1991 Australian Endurance Championship 4th Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R Nissan Motor Sport
1992 Australian Touring Car Championship 2nd Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R Winfield Team Nissan
1993 Australian Touring Car Championship 4th Holden VP Commodore Winfield Racing
1994 Australian Touring Car Championship 6th Holden VP Commodore Winfield Racing
1994 Australian Super Production Car Series 4th Porsche 968 CS Jim Richards
1995 Australian Touring Car Championship 12th Holden VR Commodore Winfield Racing
1995 Australian Super Touring Championship 16th Hyundai Lantra
Ford Mondeo
Hyundai Automotive
Ross Palmer Motorsport
1995 Australian GT Production Car Series 1st Porsche 968CS & Porsche 911 RSCS Bob Jane T Mart
1996 Australian Super Touring Championship 8th Vauxhall Cavalier Jim Richards
1996 Australian GT Production Car Championship 2nd Porsche 993 RSCS Jim Richards
1996 Australian Superspeedway Series (NASCAR) 1st Pontiac Grand Prix Garry Rogers Motorsport
1997 Australian Super Touring Championship 5th Volvo 850 Volvo Dealer Racing
1998 Australian Super Touring Championship 3rd Volvo S40 Volvo Dealer Racing
1999 Shell Championship Series 62nd Ford AU Falcon John Briggs Motorsport
1999 Australian Super Touring Championship 2nd Volvo S40 Volvo Dealer Racing
1999 Australian GT Production Car Championship 1st Porsche 996 GT3 Jim Richards
2000 Shell Championship Series 33rd Ford AU Falcon John Briggs Motorsport
2000 Australian Nations Cup Championship 1st Porsche 996 GT3 Jim Richards
2001 Shell Championship Series 35th Ford AU Falcon Ford Tickford Racing
2001 Australian Nations Cup Championship 1st Porsche 996 GT3 OAMPS Insurance Brokers
2002 V8Supercar Championship Series 33rd Holden VX Commodore Holden Racing Team
2002 Australian Nations Cup Championship 1st Porsche 996 GT3 OAMPS Insurance
2003 V8Supercar Championship Series 37th Holden VY Commodore Holden Racing Team
2003 Australian Nations Cup Championship 15th Porsche 911 GT3 OAMPS Insurance
2003 Australian Carrera Cup Championship 1st Porsche 996 GT3 Cup Jim Richards Racing
2004 V8Supercar Championship Series 39th Holden VY Commodore Castrol Perkins Racing
2004 Australian Carrera Cup Championship 2nd Porsche 996 GT3 Cup Jim Richards
2005 V8Supercar Championship Series 47th Holden VZ Commodore Holden Racing Team
2005 Australian Carrera Cup Championship 2nd Porsche 996 GT3 Cup OAMPS Insurance
2006 V8Supercar Championship Series 58th Holden VZ Commodore Holden Racing Team
2006 Australian Carrera Cup Championship 4th Porsche 997 GT3 Cup OAMPS Insurance Brokers
2007 Biante Touring Car Masters 12th Chevrolet Camaro Sunliner RV
2009 Australian GT Championship 3rd Porsche 997 GT3 Cup Jim Richards Racing
2009 Touring Car Masters (Group 1) 4th Ford Falcon Sprint Jim Richards Racing
2010 Touring Car Masters 1st Ford Falcon Sprint Jim Richards Racing
2011 Touring Car Masters (Class C) 2nd Ford Falcon Sprint Jim Richards Racing
2012 Australian Touring Car Masters Series (Class A) 2nd AMC Javelin AMX Jim Richards Racing
2013 Touring Car Masters 1st Ford Falcon Sprint Jim Richards Racing
2014 Touring Car Masters (Pro Masters Class) 4th Ford Falcon Sprint Shannons Insurance
2015 Touring Car Masters (Pro Masters Class) 2nd AMC Javelin Shannons Insurance

Complete World Sportscar Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Team Car 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 DC Points
1981 Australia Porsche Cars Australia Porsche 924 Carrera GTR DAY SEB MUG MNZ RIV SIL NUR LMS
DNS
PER DAY WAT SPA MOS RAM BRA NC 0
1984 Australia JPS Team BMW BMW 320i MNZ SIL LMS NUR BHT MOS SPA IMO FJI KYL SAN
ovr:14
cls:1
NC 0

Complete World Touring Car Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Team Car 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 DC Points
1987 Australia JPS Team BMW BMW M3 MNZ JAR DIJ NUR SPA BNO SIL BAT
ovr:4
cls:1
CLD
Ret
NC 0
New Zealand Viacard Services WEL
ovr:19
cls:6
FJI

† Not eligible for series points

Complete Asia-Pacific Touring Car Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Team Car 1 2 3 4 DC Points
1988 Australia Mobil 1 Racing BMW M3 BAT
Ret
WEL
Ret
PUK FJI NC 0

Complete 24 Hours of Le Mans results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1981 Australia Porsche Cars Australia Australia Peter Brock
Australia Colin Bond
Porsche 924 Carrera GTR GT - DNS DNS

Complete Bathurst 24 Hour results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
2002 Australia Prancing Horse Racing Scuderia Austria Matt Weiland
Indonesia Maher Algadrie
Australia Peter Fitzgerald
Porsche 996 GT3 R 1 451 15th 3rd

Complete Bathurst 1000 results

Jim Richards won the Bathurst 1000 seven times. His first three wins were in 1978, 1979 and 1980 with Peter Brock who himself won the race a record nine times (Richard's seven wins puts him second all time to Brock who won 9 times). Richards also had three wins with Mark Skaife and once with Swedish driver Rickard Rydell. Of his record 36 race starts, 22 were with a factory backed team for either Holden, BMW, Nissan or Volvo with only victory in a BMW eluding him. He finished on the podium 13 times with seven wins, three seconds and three thirds, plus one class win.

Year Car# Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1974 9 New Zealand R Coppins New Zealand Rod Coppins Holden LH Torana SL/R 5000 3001 – 6000cc 158 3rd 3rd
1975 15 New Zealand R Coppins New Zealand Rod Coppins Holden LH Torana SL/R 5000 L34 D 147 8th 5th
1976 2 Australia John Goss Racing Pty Ltd Australia John Goss Ford XB Falcon GT Hardtop 3001cc – 6000cc 129 31st 10th
1977 10 New Zealand Melford Motors New Zealand Rod Coppins Ford XB Falcon GT Hardtop 3001cc – 6000cc 53 DNF DNF
1978 05 Australia Holden Dealer Team Australia Peter Brock Holden LX Torana SS A9X Hatchback A 163 1st 1st
1979 05 Australia Holden Dealer Team Australia Peter Brock Holden LX Torana SS A9X Hatchback A 163 1st 1st
1980 05 Australia Marlboro Holden Dealer Team Australia Peter Brock Holden VC Commodore 3001-6000cc 163 1st 1st
1981 05 Australia Marlboro Holden Dealer Team Australia Peter Brock Holden VC Commodore 8 Cylinder & Over 103 21st 12th
1982 31 Australia JPS Team BMW United Kingdom David Hobbs BMW 635 CSi A 157 5th 5th
1983 31 Australia JPS Team BMW Australia Frank Gardner BMW 635 CSi A 6 DNF DNF
1984 31 Australia JPS Team BMW Australia Tony Longhurst BMW 635 CSi Group C 39 DNF DNF
1985 1 Australia JPS Team BMW Australia Tony Longhurst BMW 635 CSi C 160 4th 4th
1986 1 Australia JPS Team BMW Australia Tony Longhurst BMW 635 CSi C 161 6th 5th
1987 44 Australia JPS Team BMW Australia Tony Longhurst BMW M3 2 156 4th 1st
1988 57 Australia Mobil 1 Racing Australia David Parsons
Australia Neil Crompton
BMW M3 B 68 DNF DNF
1989 2 Australia Nissan Motorsport Australia Australia Mark Skaife Nissan Skyline HR31 GTS-R A 160 3rd 3rd
1990 1 Australia Nissan Motorsport Australia Australia Mark Skaife Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R 1 146 18th 16th
1991 1 Australia Nissan Motorsport Australia Australia Mark Skaife Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R 1 161 1st 1st
1992 1 Australia Winfield Team Nissan Australia Mark Skaife Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R A 143 1st 1st
1993 1 Australia Winfield Racing Team Australia Mark Skaife Holden VP Commodore A 161 2nd 2nd
1994 2 Australia Winfield Racing Australia Mark Skaife Holden VP Commodore A 39 DNF DNF
1995 1 Australia Winfield Racing Australia Mark Skaife Holden VR Commodore 65 DNF DNF
1996 32 Australia Garry Rogers Motorsport New Zealand Steven Richards Holden VR Commodore 33 DNF DNF
1997* 4 Australia Volvo Dealer Racing Sweden Rickard Rydell Volvo 850 159 4th 4th
1997 34 Australia Garry Rogers Motorsport New Zealand Steven Richards Holden VS Commodore L1 161 2nd 2nd
1998* 40 Australia Volvo S40 Racing Sweden Rickard Rydell Volvo S40 ST 161 1st 1st
1998 35 Australia Garry Rogers Motorsport Australia Jason Bargwanna Holden VS Commodore OC 161 3rd 3rd
1999 600 Australia PAE Motorsport Australia John Bowe Ford AU Falcon 82 DNF DNF
2000 600 Australia Briggs Motor Sport Australia John Bowe Ford AU Falcon 147 DNF DNF
2001 6 Australia Ford Tickford Racing Australia Dean Canto Ford AU Falcon 161 5th 5th
2002 1 Australia Holden Racing Team Australia Mark Skaife Holden VX Commodore 161 1st 1st
2003 2 Australia Holden Racing Team Australia Tony Longhurst Holden VY Commodore 161 5th 5th
2004 11 Australia Castrol Perkins Racing New Zealand Steven Richards Holden VY Commodore 148 21st 21st
2005 22 Australia Holden Racing Team Australia James Courtney Holden VZ Commodore 7 DNF DNF
2006 22 Australia Holden Racing Team Australia Ryan Briscoe Holden VZ Commodore 24 DNF DNF

* Super Touring races

Complete Sandown Endurance results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1976 New Zealand Jim Richards Ford XB Falcon GT Hardtop Class D : Over 3000cc NA DNF DNF
1977 Australia Melford Motors Ford XB Falcon GT Hardtop A NA DNF DNF
1982 Australia JPS Team BMW BMW 635 CSi D 105 10th 9th
1983 Australia JPS Team BMW Australia Frank Gardner BMW 635 CSi Over 3000cc 129 2nd 2nd
1984 Australia JPS Team BMW Australia Tony Longhurst BMW 635 CSi Over 3000cc 72 DNF DNF
1985 Australia JPS Team BMW Australia Tony Longhurst BMW 635 CSi A 129 1st 1st
1986 Australia JPS Team BMW Australia Tony Longhurst BMW 635 CSi B 127 5th 5th
1987 Australia JPS Team BMW Australia Tony Longhurst BMW M3 B 118 DNF DNF
1988 Australia Mobil 1 Racing Australia Peter Brock
Australia David Parsons
BMW M3 B 122 7th 1st
1989 Australia Nissan Motorsport Australia Australia Mark Skaife Nissan Skyline HR31 GTS-R A 161 1st 1st
1994 Australia Winfield Racing Australia Mark Skaife Holden VP Commodore V8 161 2nd 2nd
1995 Australia Winfield Racing Australia Mark Skaife Holden VR Commodore 155 8th 8th
1996 Australia Garry Rogers Motorsport New Zealand Steven Richards Holden VR Commodore 73 DNF DNF
1997 Australia Garry Rogers Motorsport New Zealand Steven Richards Holden VR Commodore 155 5th 5th
1998 Australia Garry Rogers Motorsport Australia Jason Bargwanna Holden VS Commodore OC 144 7th 7th
2001 Australia V.I.P. Petfoods United Kingdom Tony Quinn Porsche 996 GT3 N 126 DNF DNF
2002 Australia V.I.P. Petfoods (Aust) P/L United Kingdom Tony Quinn Porsche 996 GT3 G1 161 2nd 2nd
2003 Australia Holden Racing Team Australia Tony Longhurst Holden VY Commodore 140 10th 10th
2004 Australia Castrol Perkins Racing New Zealand Steven Richards Holden VY Commodore 155 15th 15th
2005 Australia Holden Racing Team Australia James Courtney Holden VZ Commodore 159 11th 11th
2006 Australia Holden Racing Team Australia Ryan Briscoe Holden VZ Commodore 157 21st 21st

1992 Bathurst 1000

Richards is noted for his speech when he and co-driver Mark Skaife were loudly booed by the crowd after winning the 1992 Bathurst 1000 whereas normally winners were greeted with support. Skaife gave a short speech after which Richards said very few words, "I'm just really stunned for words, I can't believe the reception. I thought Australian race fans had a lot more to go than this, this is bloody disgraceful. I'll keep racing but I tell you what this is going to remain with me for a long time. You're a pack of arseholes."[27] Podium MC and Channel 7 commentator Gary Wilkinson then suggested he could cool the crowd down with a champagne bath, to which Richards replied "I wouldn't bother."

Due to appalling weather conditions with heavy rain with multiple cars crashed and stopped on the side of the race track the race was stopped on lap 145. On lap 144 Richards, who had already crashed once rendering the car heavily damaged and barely drivable, slid off the road and came to a stop behind another crashed car. He had been leading at the time his car left the road but was overtaken by Ford driver Dick Johnson, who assumed the lead, and several other cars before the red flag was waved which ended the race. The race results were to be wound back to the last completed lap, lap 144, which would have seen Johnson the winner, but due to the large number of crashes on lap 144 the race was woundback an additional lap which meant Richards and Skaife were declared winners. This decision was unpopular with the crowd who were primarily being divided between Holden and Ford supporters and who didn't like a crashed and undriveable car being the winner.

Richards later apologised for the outburst, citing the fact that he had been told just before going out onto the podium that his longtime friend and former JPS BMW teammate Denny Hulme had died from a heart attack which he suffered while driving in the early part of the race.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Kiwi legend Jim Richards inducted into Hall of Fame". New Zealand Herald. 3 December 2016. Retrieved 27 January 2017.
  2. ^ "Lowndes wins major V8 award". Fox Sports Australia. 12 December 2006. Archived from the original on 6 January 2007. Retrieved 3 January 2007.
  3. ^ Naismith, Barry (1986). The Jim Richards Story. Victoria: GP Publications. p. 17. ISBN 0-908081-82-0.
  4. ^ a b Naismith 1986, p.18
  5. ^ Naismith 1986, p20
  6. ^ a b Naismith 1986, p21
  7. ^ Naismith 1986, p25
  8. ^ Naismith 1986, p42-44
  9. ^ a b Naismith 1986, p45
  10. ^ Naismith 1986, p32
  11. ^ a b c Naismith 1986, p37-38
  12. ^ Naismith 1986, p39
  13. ^ a b c d Naismith 1986, p64-65
  14. ^ Naismith 1986, p52
  15. ^ Naismith 1986, p53
  16. ^ Naismith 1986, p55
  17. ^ a b c d Naismith 1986, p59-61
  18. ^ Naismith 1986, p68-72
  19. ^ a b c Naismith 1986, p68-73
  20. ^ a b Naismith 1986, p75-81
  21. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l04XX0p1fYI
  22. ^ Naismith 1986, p83-87
  23. ^ a b Naismith 1986, p89-95
  24. ^ When Jim Called Them A Pack Of ...
  25. ^ Octagon Australia. "Targa Tasmania Results Archive".
  26. ^ a b c Tom Naughton, Frank's final, Jimmy's "SS", Racing Car News, January 1977, pages 48 & 49
  27. ^ Bidwell, Peter (2006). V8 Kiwis. Auckland: Hodder Moa. p. 18. ISBN 1-86971-060-6.

External links

  • Jim Richards Hot Laps Experience
  • Jim Richards Racing Homepage
  • VESRIX
  • 2003 Carrera Cup
  • 2007 CAMS Manual of Motor Sport
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Allan Moffat
Jacky Ickx
Winner of the Bathurst 1000
1978, 1979 and 1980
(with Peter Brock)
Succeeded by
Dick Johnson
John French
Preceded by
Dick Johnson
Winner of the Australian Touring Car Championship
1985
Succeeded by
Robbie Francevic
Preceded by
Robbie Francevic
Winner of the Australian Touring Car Championship
1987
Succeeded by
Dick Johnson
Preceded by
inaugural
Winner of the Australian AUSCAR Championship
1987/88
Succeeded by
Tony Kavich
Preceded by
Dick Johnson
Winner of the Australian Touring Car Championship
1990 and 1991
Succeeded by
Mark Skaife
Preceded by
Win Percy
Allan Grice
Winner of the Bathurst 1000
1991 and 1992
(with Mark Skaife)
Succeeded by
Larry Perkins
Gregg Hansford
Preceded by
Brad Jones
Winner of the Australian NASCAR Championship
1995/96
Succeeded by
Kim Jane
Preceded by
David Brabham
Geoff Brabham
Winner of the Bathurst 1000
1998
(with Rickard Rydell)
Succeeded by
Paul Morris
Preceded by
Mark Skaife
Tony Longhurst
Winner of the Bathurst 1000
2002
(with Mark Skaife)
Succeeded by
Greg Murphy
Rick Kelly
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