James Webb (Attorney General)

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James Webb (1792 – 1856) was an attorney, judge, and politician in the Republic of Texas and during the early days of statehood after its annexation by the United States. Webb was born in Virginia in 1792 and spent part of his early years in Georgia and Florida. He taught school as a teenager, worked in the office of the county clerk and studied for the bar. He became an attorney in 1816.

He moved back to Florida in 1823 where he established the community of Webbville in Jackson County. He served as one of the trustees of the first public school in the area, Webbville Academy. In 1828 he was named a federal judge for the newly created Southern District of Florida by President John Quincy Adams.

In 1838, he moved to Texas where he caught the attention of President Mirabeau Lamar, who made him Secretary of State, Secretary of Treasury, and Attorney General of the young republic. In 1841 he was named minister to Mexico. He attempted to establish diplomatic relations during this time, but was unsuccessful.

He served again as Secretary of State after statehood. He was later appointed the first District Judge for the 14th District which included Corpus Christi, his new home.

Webb County, Texas is named in honor of James Webb.

References

  • Handbook of Texas Online - James Webb
  • James Webb and Webbville - Part One
  • James Webb and Webbville - Part Two
  • Texas Secretary of State - History of the Office


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