James Dwyer (American football)

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James Dwyer
LSU-Coach Dwyer.jpg
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1884-08-30)August 30, 1884
Fall Brook, Pennsylvania
Died March 29, 1939(1939-03-29) (aged 54)
Philipsburg, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1906–1907 Penn
Position(s) Center
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1908 Auburn (assistant)
1911–1913 LSU
1923–1925 Toledo
Head coaching record
Overall 28–22–2
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 Northwestern Ohio Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1923)

James K. "Pat" Dwyer (August 30, 1884 – March 29, 1939) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at Louisiana State University (1911–1913)[1] and the University of Toledo (1923–1925),[2] compiling a career record of 28–22–2.

Playing career

Dwyer was a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. He lettered in football two seasons, 1906 and 1907, for Penn under coach Carl Sheldon Williams.[3] In 1906, Dwyer helped the Quakers to a 7–2–3 record. In 1907, Penn went 11–1, and was retroactively awarded a national championship by Parke H. Davis with other organizations naming Yale as champion.[4] These Penn teams were led by All-Americans August Ziegler at guard and Dexter Draper at tackle.[5]

Death

Dwyer died in 1939 of a heart attack.[6]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
LSU Tigers (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1911–1913)
1911 LSU 6–3 1–1
1912 LSU 4–3 1–3
1913 LSU 6–1–2 1–1–1
LSU: 16–7–2 3–5–1
Toledo Rockets (Northwestern Ohio Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1923–1925)
1923 Toledo 6–4 1st
1924 Toledo 5–3
1925 Toledo 1–8
Toledo: 12–15
Total: 28–22–2
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References

  1. ^ "LSU Year-by-Year Records" (PDF). lsusports.net. p. 107. Retrieved 2018-07-29.
  2. ^ "2009 Toledo Football Media Guide" (PDF). University of Toledo. August 1, 2009. p. 159. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  3. ^ 2006 University of Pennsylvania Football Media Guide, p. 139, accessed February 4, 2007
  4. ^ 2006 University of Pennsylvania Football Media Guide, p. 15
  5. ^ 2006 University of Pennsylvania Football Media Guide, p. 135
  6. ^ "James K. Dwyer". Wellsboro Agitator. Wellsboro, Pennsylvania. March 29, 1939. Retrieved January 18, 2016.
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