Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund

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Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund
Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund logo.gif
Founded 2000; 18 years ago (2000)
Founder Zachary and Elizabeth Fisher
Type Non-profit organization
Key people
Richard Santulli, Chairman
Website http://www.fallenheroesfund.org

The Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund is a non-profit organization that currently builds advanced treatment centers to provide care to military personnel suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress (PTS).[1] Since its inception in 2000, IFHF has provided over $200 million[2] to treat service members with TBI and PTS and those with amputations and severe burn injuries, in addition to helping families of US military personnel killed in action.[1]

Initiatives

Family support

IFHF's first initiative was to provide support to families of both the United States and British military personnel lost in performance of their duty, mostly in service in Iraq and Afghanistan. In the years from 2000 to 2005, the Fund provided close to $20 million to spouses and dependent children, and to parents of unmarried service members. In 2005, federal legislation substantially increased the benefits to these families, and IFHF redirected its efforts. [3]

Entrance to Center for the Intrepid

Center for the Intrepid

IFHF’s next initiative was supporting military personnel severely wounded while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. To support this effort, IFHF raised the funds and built the Center for the Intrepid, located at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. The Center for the Intrepid was completed and opened in 2007. [4]

National Intrepid Center of Excellence

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates at the groundbreaking ceremony for the National Intrepid Center of Excellence

After completion of the Center for the Intrepid, IFHF began to tackle traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress in military personnel. IFHF constructed the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE), located in Bethesda, Maryland, at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. This location allows close collaboration with the Uniformed Services University, the National Institutes of Health, and the Veterans Health Administration. NICoE was dedicated and opened in 2010, and provides diagnostics, initial treatment plans, family education, introduction to therapeutic modalities, and referral and reintegration support for military personnel and veterans suffering from these issues. In addition, NICoE conducts research, tests new protocols and provides comprehensive training and education to patients, providers and families, while also maintaining ongoing telehealth follow-up care with patients all over the country and throughout the world. [5]

Intrepid Spirit Centers

In January 2012, the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund announced its newest and current initiative: the creation of additional centers to serve as satellites to NICoE[6]. As of April 2018, seven Intrepid Spirit Centers have been funded, built, and opened at the following military bases around the United States[7]:

Popular culture

In 2008, Piers Morgan won $754,300 for the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund on the competitive reality show Celebrity Apprentice (The Apprentice (U.S. season 7)).

On Veterans Day in 2011, ABC's Extreme Makeover: Home Edition hosted a one-hour special: Extreme Makeover: Home Edition "Rise and Honor" A Veterans Day Special. The net proceeds raised during the show benefited six different veteran-serving organizations, including the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund.[8]

References

  1. ^ a b "Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund - About IFHF". fallenheroesfund.org. Retrieved May 16, 2018. 
  2. ^ "Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund Creates A Better World For Veterans". newyork.cbslocal.com. 2017. Retrieved May 18, 2018. 
  3. ^ "Family Support". fallenheroesfund.org. 2017. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  4. ^ Christenson, Sig (2007). "Center for Intrepid opens with soldiers in spotlight". mysanantonio.com. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  5. ^ Collins, Shannon (2016). "National Intrepid Center Zeroes In on Traumatic Brain Injury". defense.gov. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  6. ^ Dao, James (2012). "Private Group to Build Trauma Centers for Military". nytimes.com. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  7. ^ "$12M traumatic brain injury treatment facility opening at Lewis-McChord". stripes.com. 2018. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  8. ^ "Jewel To Co-Host Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Veterans Day Special". looktothestars.org. Retrieved January 26, 2012. 
  • Lamance, Rich (29 January 2007). "Center for the Intrepid opens its doors". af.mil. Retrieved January 26, 2012. 
  • Sieff, Kevin (25 June 2010). "Center to treat troops with brain injuries opens in Bethesda". washingtonpost.com. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 


External links

  • https://www.fallenheroesfund.org/about-us
  • https://www.fallenheroesfund.org/intrepid-spirit
  • http://www.dcoe.health.mil/ComponentCenters/NICoE.aspx
  • http://www.bamc.amedd.army.mil/departments/orthopaedic/cfi/
  • http://www.fisherhouse.org/
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