Indonesia AirAsia

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Indonesia AirAsia
AirAsia New Logo.svg
IATA ICAO Callsign
Founded December 2004 (as Awair)
Frequent-flyer program BIG[2]
Fleet size 18
Destinations 16
Company slogan Now Everyone Can Fly
Parent company PT Fersindo Nusaperkasa
Headquarters Tangerang, Indonesia
Key people

CEO, Dendy Kurniawan 2016-present

An Indonesia AirAsia Airbus A320-200 in Turn Back Crime Livery

PT. Indonesia AirAsia, operating as Indonesia AirAsia, is a low-cost airline based in Tangerang, Indonesia. It operates scheduled domestic, international services and is an Indonesian associate carrier of Malaysian low-fare airline AirAsia. Its main base is Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Jakarta.[4] Until July 2010, Indonesia Air Asia, along with many Indonesian airlines, was banned from flying to the EU due to safety concerns. However, the ban was lifted in July 2010.[5] Indonesia AirAsia is listed in category 1 by the Indonesian Civil Aviation Authority for airline safety quality.[6] In 2011, this all-airbus airline dominated international market in Indonesia by 41.50%.[clarification needed][7]


As Awair

The airline was established as Awair (Air Wagon International) in 1999 by Abdurrahman Wahid, former chairman of the Nahdlatul Ulama Muslim organisation. He had a 40% stake in the airline which he relinquished after being elected president of Indonesia in October 1999. It started operations on 22 June 2000 with Airbus 300/310 and also with the A320 aircraft, but all flights were suspended in March 2002. Awair restarted operating domestically within Indonesia as an associate of AirAsia in January 2005.

As Indonesia AirAsia

On 1 December 2005, Awair changed its name to Indonesia AirAsia in line with the other AirAsia branded airlines in the region. AirAsia Berhad has a 49% share in the airline with Fersindo Nusaperkasa owning 51%. Indonesia's laws disallow majority foreign ownership on domestic civil aviation operations.

Indonesia AirAsia in red and white livery

The company appointed CIMB Securities Indonesia and Credit Suisse Securities Indonesia as joint-lead underwriters for the 20 percent IPO in the fourth quarter 2011.[8]

A buy out of Batavia Air was announced on 26 July 2012. It was to be in two stages with AirAsia to buy 76.95% shares form Metro Batavia in a partnership with Fersindo Nusaperkasa (Indonesia AirAsia). By 2013, AirAsia was to acquire the remaining 23.05% held by other shareholders. The acquisition of Batavia Air by AirAsia Berhad and Fersindo created some controversy with Indonesian regulators at the time.[9]

By 11 October 2012 the deal between AirAsia Berhad, Fersindo Nusaperkasa (Indonesia AirAsia) and PT Metro Batavia had reversed.[10]

When the cancellation of the planned takeover between Batavia and AirAsia was announced on 11 October 2012 a joint statement was issued announcing a plan to proceed with an alliance encompassing ground handling, distribution and inventory systems in Indonesia. The statement also announced a plan to deliver operational alliances between Batavia and the Air Asia group.

Batavia and Indonesia Air Asia announced a plan to form a separate joint venture to provide a regional pilot training centre in Indonesia. No details were provided on that new alliance when it was announced in early October 2012.[11]

Corporate affairs

The airline's head office is in Tangerang, adjacent to Soekarno-Hatta International Airport.[12] It has the AirAsia logo on its roof and uses natural lighting. As of 2013 over 2,000 employees work there. Prior to the building's 2013 opening, the airline's employees worked in several offices in Jakarta.[13] They were divided between Terminal 1A of Soekarno-Hatta Airport, Soewarna, and Menara Batavia.[12]


Indonesia AirAsia Airbus A320-200 about to land at Ngurah Rai International Airport


Current Fleet

An Indonesia AirAsia's Boeing 737-300
Indonesia AirAsia's Airbus A320-200

The Indonesia AirAsia fleet consists of the following aircraft (as of August 2017):[14]

Indonesia AirAsia fleet
Aircraft In service Orders Passengers Notes
Airbus A320-200 18 180 All to be returned to AirAsia
being replaced by A320neo starting 2017.
Airbus A320neo 30 186 Delivered from 2017 and replacing the Airbus A320.
Total 18 30

Former Fleet

The airline previously operated the following aircraft :

Incidents and accidents

PK-AXC, the aircraft involved in Indonesia AirAsia Flight 8501, seen for landing at Singapore Changi Airport in April 2014.
  • On 28 December 2014, Indonesia AirAsia Flight 8501, an Airbus A320-216 registered PK-AXC (MSN 3648) with 155 passengers and 7 crew on board, crashed into the Java Sea whilst en route from Juanda International Airport, Surabaya to Changi International Airport, Singapore, killing all 162 on board. Regulatory licenses for the Surabaya-Singapore route as well as Medan-Palembang route have been suspended for Indonesia AirAsia since January 2015 due to suspected licensing breaches, however the Medan-Palembang route had been resumed.
  • On 15 October 2017, Indonesia AirAsia Flight 535, an Airbus A320-216 registered PK-AXD (MSN 3182) with 146 passengers and 6 crew on board, had to divert back to Perth whilst performing flight QZ535 to Denpasar, Bali. The plane lost cabin pressure after 25 minutes it departed and oxygen masks were released. The plane turned around and diverted back to Perth and the plane landed safely in Perth just an hour after it departed, no passengers nor the crew were injured, the flight was cancelled and passengers were put on to other flights to Denpasar.[15][16]

See also


  1. ^ redOrbit (14 March 2008). "Indonesia AirAsia to Spend RM200m on Developing New Routes - Redorbit". 
  2. ^ Join BIG! AirAsia BIG Loyalty Programme Archived 26 May 2008 at the Wayback Machine.
  3. ^
  4. ^ "Directory: World Airlines". Flight International. 3 April 2007. p. 93. 
  5. ^ "List of airlines banned within the EU". European Commission's "Transport" website. Archived from the original on 5 August 2010. Retrieved 10 July 2010. 
  6. ^ :: Directorate General Of Civil Aviation ::
  7. ^ "AirAsia Indonesia to operate 34 Airbus planes in 2015". 6 March 2012. 
  8. ^ "AirAsia Indonesia to Sell around 20 Pct Stake Via IPO -". 
  9. ^ Bernama Media – Mon, 30 July 2012 (30 July 2012). "Indonesia May Cancel Airasia's Acquisition Of Batavia Air - Yahoo! News Malaysia". Retrieved 15 October 2012. 
  10. ^ Linda Silaen; Abhrajit Gangopadyay (11 October 2012). "Batavia Air CEO: AirAsia Drops Plan to Buy Carrier". - from 2012 Dow Jones&Company. Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 20 October 2012. 
  11. ^ Francezka Nangoy (16 October 2012). "AirAsia, Batavia Air Choose Alliance Over Acquisition". Archived from the original on 4 February 2013. Retrieved 20 October 2012. 
  12. ^ a b "AirAsia Indonesia Resmikan Kantor Pusat Baru" (Archived 30 December 2014 at WebCite). AirAsia. 27 December 2014. Retrieved on 30 December 2014. "Kantor baru yang terletak di belakang Bandara Soekarno-Hatta, Cengkareng, tepatnya di Jl. Marsekal Suryadarma, Tangerang, Banten, itu juga menjadi rumah baru bagi seluruh karyawan AirAsia Indonesia yang sebelumnya berkantor di Terminal 1A Bandara Internasional Soekarno-Hatta, Menara Batavia, dan Soewarna."
  13. ^ "AirAsia Indonesia Officiates New Headquarters in Jakarta" (Archived 30 December 2014 at WebCite). AirAsia. 27 December 2013. Retrieved on 30 December 2014.
  14. ^ "Global Airline Guide 2017 (Part One)". Airliner World (October 2017): 16. 
  15. ^ "Incident: Indonesia AirAsia A320 near Perth on Oct 15th 2017, loss of cabin pressure". 
  16. ^ "AirAsia flight from Perth to Bali turned around after mid-air emergency". 15 October 2017. 

External links

  • Indonesia AirAsia fleet age
  • Indonesia AirAsia fleet detail
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