Incisive foramen

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Incisive foramen
Gray160.png
The bony palate and alveolar arch.
Details
Identifiers
Latin foramen incisivum
TA A02.1.00.060
FMA 57737
Anatomical terms of bone
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In the human mouth, the incisive foramen, also called anterior palatine foramen, or nasopalatine foramen is a funnel-shaped opening in the bone of the oral hard palate immediately behind the incisor teeth where blood vessels and nerves pass. The incisive foramen is continuous with the incisive canal, this foramen or group of foramina is located behind the central incisor teeth in the incisive fossa of the maxilla.

The incisive foramen receives the nasopalatine nerves from the floor of the nasal cavity along with the sphenopalatine artery supplying the mucous membrane covering the hard palate of the mouth.

In many other species, the incisive foramina allow for passage of ducts to the vomeronasal organ.

Additional images

References

This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 162 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)

External links

  • Anatomy figure: 22:4b-01 at Human Anatomy Online, SUNY Downstate Medical Center


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