Imagery

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This article is about imagery in literary texts. For imagery in cognitive psychology, see mental image. For various senses of the word imaging, see Imaging (disambiguation).

Imagery, in a literary text, is an author's use of vivid and descriptive language to add depth to their work. It appeals to human senses to deepen the reader's understanding of the work. Powerful forms of imagery engage all of the senses pro lenses.

Forms

There are seven major types of imagery, each corresponding to a sense, feeling, or action:

  • Visual imagery pertains to graphics, visual scenes, pictures, or the sense of sight.
  • Auditory imagery pertains to sounds, noises, music, or the sense of hearing. (This kind of imagery may come in the form of onomatopoeia).
  • Olfactory imagery pertains to odors, scents, or the sense of smell.
  • Gustatory imagery pertains to flavors or the sense of taste.
  • Tactile imagery pertains to physical textures or the sense of touch.

Less used

  • Kinesthetic imagery pertains to movements or the sense of bodily motion.
  • Organic imagery or subjective imagery, pertains to personal experiences of a character's body, including emotion and the senses of hunger, thirst, fatigue, and pain.[1]

References

  1. ^ "Poetics of Robert Frost: Examples". Friends of Robert Frost. Retrieved 12 March 2013. 

External links

  • "Imagery and Imagination". Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 
  • Thomas, Nigel J.T (Winter 2011), Zalta, Edward N., ed., "Mental Imagery", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Stanford University, retrieved February 16, 2012 
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