IAI Searcher

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Searcher
IAI-Searcher1.jpg
IAI Searcher in Tel Nof Airbase, Israel
Role Reconnaissance UAV
National origin Israel
Manufacturer IAI
Introduction • Searcher 1 - 1992[1]

• Searcher 2 - 1998[1]

The IAI Searcher (also known by the Hebrew name מרומית Meyromit - "Marsh tern",[2] or officially in Israel as the חוגלה Hugla - "Alectoris") is a reconnaissance UAV developed in Israel in the 1980s. In the following decade, it replaced the IMI Mastiff and IAI Scout UAVs then in service with the Israeli Army.

Design

The Searcher looks almost identical to the Scout and Pioneer, but is in fact scaled up and is well over twice the size of the Scout. The Searcher is powered by a 35 kW (47 hp) piston engine. The new design features updated avionics and sensor systems with greater flight endurance as well as increased redundancy for improved survivability. In addition to Israel, the system had been exported and is currently in use by Russia, India, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Singapore,[3] Thailand and Turkey.[4]

Operational deployment

More than 100 Searcher IIs are being operated by the Indian Air Force and the Indian Navy.

Crashes

May 21, 2015 Russian UAV "Forpost" (Searcher II, tail number 923) crashed near Avdiivka in Ukraine during the War in Donbass. The aircraft was shot down by Ukrainian volunteer battalion Dnipro-1.[5]

Users

Russian Forpost.

Specifications (Searcher II)

The IAI Searcher II

General characteristics

  • Crew: None
  • Capacity: 68 kg (150 lb) payload
  • Length: 5.85 m (19 ft 2 in)
  • Wingspan: 8.54 m (28 ft 0 in)
  • Height: 1.25 m (4 ft 1 in)
  • Gross weight: 500 kg (1,100 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Limbach L 550, 35 kW (47 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 200 km/h (125 mph)
  • Endurance: 18 hours
  • Service ceiling: 6,100 m (20,000 ft)

See also

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References

  1. ^ a b [1]
  2. ^ "Jane's Information Group". Janes.com. Retrieved 2012-11-18. 
  3. ^ "Hermes 450". Israeli-weapons.com. Retrieved 2012-11-18. 
  4. ^ [2]
  5. ^ http://censor.net.ua/photo_news/337036/kadry_sborki_sbitogo_na_donbasse_rossiyiskogo_bespilotnika_forpost_na_uralskom_zavode_po_zakazu_minoborony
  6. ^ "List of ammunition purchased by Azerbaijan made public". News.Az. 2012-03-27. Retrieved 2012-11-18. 
  7. ^ "UAVS AND UCAVS: DEVELOPMENTS IN THE EUROPEAN UNION – Appendix III, Table 1". Retrieved 2013-01-01. [permanent dead link]
  8. ^ http://www.defenseworld.net/news/13210/Russian_Force_Practice_Flying_Forpost__Orlan_10_Drones_In_Tajikistan#.V0mXqmh96Uk
  9. ^ http://www.armstrade.org/includes/periodics/news/2017/1225/143544779/detail.shtml
  10. ^ "คณะเจ้าหน้าที่ของกองทัพเรือ เยี่ยมชมสาธิตการบิน UAV แบบ Searcher II ของกองทัพบก". Thaifighterclub.org. Retrieved 2012-11-18. 

This article contains material that originally came from the web article Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by Greg Goebel, which exists in the Public Domain.

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