Human biology

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Human biology is an interdisciplinary area of study that examines humans through the influences and interplay of many diverse fields such as genetics, evolution, physiology, anatomy, epidemiology, anthropology, ecology, nutrition, population genetics, and sociocultural influences.[1] It is closely related to biological anthropology and other biological fields tying in various aspects of human functionality. It wasn't until the 20th century when well-known biogerontologist, Raymond Pearl, author of the journal Human Biology, phrased the term "human biology" in a way to describe a separate subsection apart from biology.[2]

References

  1. ^ Sara Stinson, Barry Bogin, Dennis O'Rourke. Human Biology: An Evolutionary and Biocultural Perspective. Publisher John Wiley & Sons, 2012. ISBN 1118108043. Page 4-5.
  2. ^ "Human Biology - Definition, History and Major". Biology Dictionary. 2017-05-26. Retrieved 2019-03-22.

External links

  • Human Biology Association
  • https://biologydictionary.net/human-biology/
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