Horizon City, Texas

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Horizon City, Texas
City
Horizon City Town Hall
Horizon City Town Hall
Location of Horizon City, Texas
Location of Horizon City, Texas
ElPaso County HorizonCity.svg
Coordinates: 31°40′56″N 106°11′46″W / 31.68222°N 106.19611°W / 31.68222; -106.19611Coordinates: 31°40′56″N 106°11′46″W / 31.68222°N 106.19611°W / 31.68222; -106.19611
Country United States
State Texas
County El Paso
Founded 1962
Incorporated October 22, 1988
Government
 • Type Mayor-council
 • Mayor Ruben Mendoza
Area
 • Total 8.7 sq mi (22.6 km2)
 • Land 8.7 sq mi (22.6 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 4,022 ft (1,226 m)
Population (2017 est)
 • Total 19,562
 • Density 2,200/sq mi (870/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP codes 79927-79928
Area code(s) 915
FIPS code 48-34832[1]
GNIS feature ID 1359564[2]
Website www.horizoncity.org

Horizon City is a city in El Paso County, Texas, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 16,735, reflecting an increase of 11,502 from the 5,233 counted in the 2000 Census.[3] As of July 1, 2017, the population estimate for the city from the U.S. Census was 19,562.[4] It is part of the El Paso Metropolitan Statistical Area and is situated to the immediate east of the city of El Paso.

Climate

  • Annual Maximum Avg. Temperature = 78.0 °F
  • Annual Minimum Avg. Temperature = 49.0 °F
  • Annual Avg. Temperature = 63.2 °F
  • Percent of Possible Sunshine = 83
  • Mean Number of Days Rain (Out of 365 Days) = 49
  • Mean Number of Days Snow (Out of 365 Days) = 2
  • Avg. Annual Precipitation (Total Inches) = 9.00"
  • Avg. Annual Snowfall (Total Inches) = 6.00"

Geography

Horizon City is located at 31°40′56″N 106°11′46″W / 31.68222°N 106.19611°W / 31.68222; -106.19611 (31.682315, −106.196127).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.7 square miles (22.6 km2), all of it land.[3]

Government

The current mayor of Horizon City is Ruben Mendoza. Horizon City is also served by seven Aldermen who are elected to two year terms. Four of the Aldermen are elected every even year and the other three and the mayor are elected every odd year in the month of May. The current Aldermen of Horizon City are Walter Miller, Juan "Jerry" Garcia, Charlie Ortega, Kathy Masters, Johnny "Doc" Duran, Breanne Wilson and Samantha S. Corral.[6][7]

Economic Development Corporation

Horizon City formed an Economic Development Corporation to create jobs, boost capital investment and improve quality of life through. The nonprofit was created in 2011 when it received overwhelming support from voters to offer incentives that bring investment and create high quality jobs. The corporation has the power to use sales tax funds to help eligible companies with relocations, expansions and site development. It can acquire property, finance infrastructure projects and expend funds for a variety of quality of life improvements.[8]

The development entity is actively seeking investments from:

  • Corporations keen to relocate their national or regional headquarters
  • Manufacturing and industrial operations
  • Technical schools
  • Research and development firms eager to unlock their potential serving the U.S. Army’s second-largest installation
  • Research labs and healthcare companies ready to harness the economic strength of the region’s flourishing medical community.

History

The city, incorporated by referendum on October 22, 1988,[9][10] takes its name from the real estate development corporation which developed it as a planned community beginning in the early 1960s, the Horizon Corporation. The Horizon Corporation bought up large tracts of land in the southwestern United States, including eastern El Paso County; platted them into subdivisions; and sold lots in them to thousands of people worldwide, often sight unseen, often without access to water or utilities and using questionable sales tactics, between 1962 and 1975. Eventually the Federal Trade Commission stepped in to stop it in 1981.[11][12] Only one portion of the development was successful, the area around the intersection of Horizon Boulevard (Texas Farm Road 1281) and Kenazo Street; this became the nucleus of Horizon City.

Much of the land to the east of town consists of undeveloped subdivisions with highly fragmented ownership. The lots in these subdivisions cannot be legally sold and will be difficult to develop due to the 1994 Texas Colonia Act, a state law intended to stop the development of colonias, or neighborhoods underserved by utilities whose residents often live in substandard conditions. It forbids the sale for residential purposes of less than 10 acres of land or the sale of more than 10 acres of land without a guarantee of adequate access to water, sewer services and other utilities. Efforts are currently underway by a local homeowners' association, the Horizon Communities Improvement Association, to assemble these lots into tracts of land that can be legally developed.[11][13]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1990 2,308
2000 5,233 126.7%
2010 16,735 219.8%
Est. 2017 19,562 [14] 16.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]

As of the census of 2010, there were 16,735 people, 4,733 households, and 4,081 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,923.6 people per square mile (740.5/km²). There were 5,082 housing units at an average density of 584.1/sq mi (224.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 81.3% White, 2.3% African American, 0.6% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 12.7% some other race, and 2.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 85.9% of the population.[16]

There were 4,733 households out of which 64.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.8% were headed by married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 13.8% were non-families. 10.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 2.4% were someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.54, and the average family size was 3.83.[16]

In the city, the population was spread out with 38.2% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 32.1% from 25 to 44, 16.0% from 45 to 64, and 4.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 26.6 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.2 males.[16]

For the period 2007–2011, the estimated median annual income for a household in the city was $49,621, and the median income for a family was $54,722. Males had a median income of $41,784 versus $33,750 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,514. About 15.2% of families and 18.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.6% of those under age 18 and 8.6% of those age 65 or over.[17]

Quality of Life

The lush 18-hole Horizon Golf & Conference Center remains the picturesque heart at the center of the close-knit city that has three public parks, a splash park and a senior community center.

The Hospitals of Providence in 2017 is building a 40,000 square-foot campus in Horizon City that will provide high-quality health care and reduced travel times for medical attention. Providence’s joint venture with Emerus, the nation’s largest operator of micro-hospitals, will have an emergency department, inpatient unit as well as lab and imaging services.

Mission Ridge, a master-planned development from Hunt Companies, Inc., is taking shape just west of the community and will preserve open space for hiking and biking trails weaving through the sun-splashed Chihuahuan Desert.[8]

Education

Horizon City is served by the Clint and Socorro Independent School Districts. The Socorro Independent School District serves the city center and adjacent neighborhoods on the west end of town; the boundary between it and the Clint Independent School District to the east is located at or near Kenazo Street.

Schools in Horizon City

Clint Independent School District campuses

Socorro Independent School District campuses

  • Eastlake High School [9th to 12th]
  • Col. John O. Ensor Middle School [6th to 8th]
  • Horizon Heights Elementary School [Pre-K to 5th]
  • Dr. Sue Shook Elementary School [Pre-K to 5th]

Other

  • Pete Duarte Head Start Center (Texas Education Agency, Region 19) [Pre-K]

Government and infrastructure

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice operates the El Paso II District Parole Office in an unincorporated area east of Horizon City.[18]

Culture

Horizon City is described as having the elements of a traditional suburban or exurban setting. Having complete autonomy in its matters, Horizon City has its own political representation and dictates the direction that the city grows without large-city interference or influence. The town is expected to take a surge in population with Fort Bliss expansion.

Service clubs in Horizon City include two Lions clubs (the Horizon City Lions Club, founded 1967, and the Horizon City Eastlake Lions Club, founded 2007) and the Horizon City Kiwanis Club.

References

  1. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Horizon City city, Texas". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved January 11, 2013. 
  4. ^ https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/horizoncitycitytexas/PST045217
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Incumbent List". El Paso County. 2009-10-06. Retrieved 2010-07-24.
  7. ^ "Election Summary Report: 2010 MAY CITIES, SCHOOLS AND WATER DIST ELECTION". El Paso County. 2010-05-13. Retrieved 2010-07-24.
  8. ^ a b http://horizonedc.com/
  9. ^ http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth276314/m1/1
  10. ^ http://www.horizoncity.org/content/files/App2_ParksPlan_client.pdf
  11. ^ a b http://www.elpasotimes.com/ci_17498314
  12. ^ http://www.elpasotimes.com/ci_18172193
  13. ^ http://www.horizoncommunities.com/
  14. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 20, 2018. 
  15. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  16. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Horizon city, Texas". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved January 11, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics: 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates (DP03): Horizon city, Texas". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved January 11, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Parole Division Region V Archived 2010-01-25 at the Wayback Machine.." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved on May 22, 2010.

External links

  • City of Horizon City official website
  • Horizon Communities Improvement Association
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