Boxing After Dark

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from HBO Boxing After Dark)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Boxing After Dark
Boxing After Dark logo.jpg
Genre Sports
Starring various
Country of origin United States
Release
Original network HBO
Original release April 1996 – October 27, 2018

Boxing After Dark is an HBO boxing program, premiering in April 1996, that usually shows fights between well-known contenders, but usually not "championship" or "title" fights. Unlike its sister program, HBO World Championship Boxing, BAD features fighters who are usually moving up from ESPN's Friday Night Fights or another basic cable boxing program. This is where fighters are given their start to become famous depending on how well they fare on BAD they might have a title fight on World Championship Boxing or could fall back (Ex: Jason Litzau had many entertaining fights on ESPN before moving up to BAD to face Jose Hernandez. After Litzau lost by knockout he returned to FNF)

It usually airs at least once a month, following a World Championship Boxing card on HBO. Boxing After Dark debuted on HBO Canada beginning January 17, 2009 at 9:45 pm. ET/7:45 pm. MT

On September 27, 2018, HBO announced they would be dropping boxing from the network following its last televised match on October 27. The reason given was due to changing audiences for the network.[1]

History

Boxing After Dark, or BAD for short, got its start in 1996 with commentators Jim Lampley and Larry Merchant. The first fight shown was an exciting 12-rounder featuring a then-unknown Marco Antonio Barrera and Kennedy McKinney. Barrera won by KO. Since then, BAD has prided itself on promoting fights between lesser-caliber fighters with something to prove, though occasionally well-known fighters, usually those signed by HBO, may make appearances.

Tenth season revamp

In April 2006, BAD entered its tenth season with an all-new lineup. Lampley and Merchant would now call only WCB and pay-per-view fights. Replacing them were Fran Charles, former ESPN and Fox Sports Net analyst Max Kellerman who receives "something in the neighborhood of $10,000 for each Boxing After Dark telecast" (Thomas Hauser) and former world heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis. Kellerman and Lewis had previously appeared on world championship and pay-per-view events for HBO as analysts and continue to do so. This season has featured mostly fights at lesser weights, a BAD staple, as well as new theme music and logo. On March 13, 2007, Fran Charles was replaced by Bob Papa due to scheduling conflicts with the NFL Network. Lampley has also on occasion stepped in for Charles.

Beginning in 2013, the teams for BAD and World Championship Boxing became identical. Lampley, Kellerman, and Roy Jones, Jr. call all boxing events for HBO with rare exceptions. Andre Ward and Bernard Hopkins serve as substitutes for Jones.

See also


  1. ^ Matthews, Wallace (September 27, 2018). "HBO Says It Is Leaving the Boxing Business". The New York Times. Retrieved September 27, 2018.
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Boxing_After_Dark&oldid=862855425"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HBO_Boxing_After_Dark
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Boxing After Dark"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA