Guildhall Art Gallery

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Guildhall Art Gallery

Coordinates: 51°30′56″N 0°05′29″W / 51.5155°N 0.0914°W / 51.5155; -0.0914 The Guildhall Art Gallery houses the art collection of the City of London, England. It occupies a building that was completed in 1999 to replace an earlier building destroyed in The Blitz in 1941. It is a stone building in a semi-gothic style intended to be sympathetic to the historic Guildhall, which is adjacent and to which it is connected internally.

History

The gallery was originally built in 1885 to house art collections from the City of London Corporation and the present collection consists of about 4,000 works, of which around 250 are on display at any one time. Many of the paintings are of London themes. There is also a significant collection of Victorian era art, including Pre-Raphaelites, which features paintings by artists such as John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Abraham Solomon, Edward John Poynter and Edwin Landseer, and a view of Salisbury Cathedral by John Constable. The centrepiece of the largest gallery is John Singleton Copley's huge painting The Defeat of the Floating Batteries at Gibraltar.

Vivien Knight was head of the Gallery, from 1983 until her death in 2009.[1]

Amphitheatre

The Roman amphitheatre below the Guildhall Art Gallery

The Guildhall complex was built on the site of London's Roman amphitheatre, and some of the remains of this are displayed in situ in a room in the basement of the art gallery. Discovered in 1985,[2] the site is now a protected monument. It is under the Guildhall Art Gallery. London's first Roman amphitheatre was built in AD70 from wood but was renovated in the early 2nd century with tiled entrances and rag-stone walls. The amphitheatre was used for various public events such as gladiator games, entertaining soldiers and the public with animal fighting and public execution of criminals, as well as religious activities. When the ancient Romans left in the 4th century the amphitheatre lay derelict for hundreds of years. In the 11th century the area was reoccupied and by the 12th century the first Guildhall was built next to it.

See also

External links

  • Guildhall Art Gallery

References

  1. ^ Rose, Andrea. "Knight, Vivien Margaret (1953–2009)". ONDB. OUP. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  2. ^ "London's Roman Amphitheatre – Guildhall Galleries – City of London". www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. Retrieved 18 June 2017.


Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Guildhall_Art_Gallery&oldid=872172050"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guildhall_Art_Gallery
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Guildhall Art Gallery"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA