Greene County, New York

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Greene County, New York
County
County of Greene
GreeneCountyCourtHouse.jpg
The Greene County Court House in Catskill, NY
Flag of Greene County, New York
Flag
Seal of Greene County, New York
Seal
Map of New York highlighting Greene County
Location in the U.S. state of New York
Map of the United States highlighting New York
New York's location in the U.S.
Founded March 3, 1800
Named for Nathanael Greene
Seat Catskill
Largest town Catskill
Area
 • Total 658 sq mi (1,704 km2)
 • Land 647 sq mi (1,676 km2)
 • Water 11 sq mi (28 km2), 1.7%
Population
 • (2010) 49,221
 • Density 76/sq mi (29/km²)
Congressional district 19th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.greenegovernment.com

Greene County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 49,221.[1] Its county seat is Catskill.[2] The county's name is in honor of the American Revolutionary War general Nathanael Greene.[3]

History

Nathanael Greene, commander in the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War and namesake of Greene County

On March 25, 1800, Greene County was created by the partitioning of Albany (360 Square Miles) and Ulster (270 Square Miles) counties, producing a county of 620 square miles (1,600 km2).[4]

On April 3, 1801, 90 square miles (230 km2) of land was transferred from Delaware and Ulster counties, raising the total area to 710 square miles (1,800 km2). This transferred Prattsville, Vly Mountain, Halcott Center, Bushnellsville, Highmount, Shandaken, Lanesville, and Pine Hill within Greene County.[5]

On May 26, 1812, Greene County lost 20 square miles (52 km2) to Ulster County, lowering the total area to 690 square miles (1,800 km2), reassigning Pine Hill, Highmount, and Shandaken to Ulster County.[6]

On April 15, 1814, the county borders were re-surveyed, and the line adjusted with no change in area.[7]

On April 17, 1822, the border was again surveyed, with no change in area, but Palenville was found to be inside Greene County.[8]

On April 23, 1823, the border was again resurveyed, and the Hudson River border with Columbia County realigned accordingly.[9]

On March 3, 1836, 30 square miles (78 km2) of area was lost to Schoharie County, reducing the total area to 660 square miles (1,700 km2), and reassigning Manorkill, producing the Greene County that exists today.[10]

Geography

Kaaterskill Falls is in Greene County

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 658 square miles (1,700 km2), of which 647 square miles (1,680 km2) is land and 11 square miles (28 km2) (1.7%) is water.[11] Greene County is located in southeast central New York State, just west of the Hudson River and south of Albany.

The northern and eastern regions are mostly low-lying flatlands. Along the Hudson River the lowest elevation is at sea level. The southern and western areas rise sharply into the Catskill Mountains.

Catskill Park takes up much of the south central region. The park contains some of the tallest peaks south of the Adirondacks. For example, the highest elevation is Hunter Mountain, at approximately 4,040 feet (1,232 m) above sea level; In addition, there are many picturesque waterfalls in the park such as the famed, Kaaterskill Falls.

The entirety of Greene County is in the 19th Congressional District, and is represented by John Faso.

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1800 12,584
1810 19,536 55.2%
1820 22,996 17.7%
1830 29,525 28.4%
1840 30,446 3.1%
1850 33,126 8.8%
1860 31,930 −3.6%
1870 31,832 −0.3%
1880 32,695 2.7%
1890 31,598 −3.4%
1900 31,478 −0.4%
1910 30,214 −4.0%
1920 25,796 −14.6%
1930 25,808 0.0%
1940 27,926 8.2%
1950 28,745 2.9%
1960 31,372 9.1%
1970 33,136 5.6%
1980 40,861 23.3%
1990 44,739 9.5%
2000 48,195 7.7%
2010 49,221 2.1%
Est. 2016 47,508 [12] −3.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[13]
1790-1960[14] 1900-1990[15]
1990-2000[16] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[17] of 2000, there were 48,195 people, 18,256 households, and 12,067 families residing in the county. The population density was 74 people per square mile (29/km²). There were 26,544 housing units at an average density of 41 per square mile (16/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 90.76% White, 5.53% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.54% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.52% from other races, and 1.36% from two or more races. 4.31% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 18.8% were of Irish, 17.8% Italian, 17.5% German, 8.6% American and 6.9% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 92.3% spoke English, 2.8% Spanish, 1.5% German and 1.3% Italian as their first language.

There were 18,256 households out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.2% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.9% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.00% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 15.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 106.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 108.2 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,493, and the median income for a family was $43,854. Males had a median income of $35,598 versus $25,346 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,931. About 8.6% of families and 12.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.7% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Presidential Elections Results[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 59.3% 13,073 33.6% 7,405 7.1% 1,572
2012 54.1% 11,174 43.7% 9,030 2.3% 464
2008 54.0% 12,059 44.1% 9,850 1.9% 426
2004 58.0% 12,996 39.9% 8,933 2.1% 469
2000 53.7% 11,332 40.2% 8,480 6.1% 1,283
1996 43.3% 8,712 41.0% 8,251 15.7% 3,161
1992 44.3% 9,390 32.7% 6,924 23.0% 4,877
1988 61.5% 11,874 37.6% 7,265 0.9% 180
1984 70.5% 14,150 29.2% 5,858 0.3% 62
1980 57.9% 11,286 33.3% 6,488 8.8% 1,724
1976 59.0% 11,370 40.2% 7,740 0.8% 154
1972 73.0% 14,313 26.8% 5,260 0.2% 45
1968 60.9% 10,954 30.6% 5,499 8.6% 1,544
1964 43.8% 7,842 56.1% 10,034 0.1% 18
1960 64.8% 11,878 35.2% 6,441 0.0% 1
1956 78.9% 14,262 21.1% 3,811 0.0% 0
1952 74.1% 12,907 25.9% 4,504 0.1% 15
1948 66.5% 10,566 31.2% 4,955 2.3% 362
1944 65.1% 9,807 34.7% 5,231 0.2% 26
1940 61.1% 10,153 38.7% 6,425 0.2% 38
1936 56.4% 9,060 42.0% 6,744 1.6% 256
1932 51.4% 7,334 47.6% 6,794 0.9% 133
1928 66.7% 9,529 31.1% 4,440 2.2% 316
1924 61.6% 7,503 32.4% 3,951 6.0% 734
1920 61.5% 6,323 34.0% 3,498 4.5% 461
1916 49.1% 3,649 48.7% 3,622 2.3% 167
1912 36.3% 2,711 48.8% 3,647 14.9% 1,113
1908 50.4% 4,191 44.6% 3,711 4.9% 411
1904 52.3% 4,527 44.4% 3,845 3.3% 289
1900 49.3% 4,395 47.9% 4,269 2.8% 248
1896 53.5% 4,540 43.4% 3,688 3.1% 264
1892 47.6% 3,914 45.9% 3,771 6.5% 532
1888 48.3% 4,460 48.6% 4,494 3.1% 286
1884 47.6% 4,167 47.4% 4,152 5.1% 442

Greene County is considered a Republican stronghold. It was one of only 11 counties in New York that did not vote for Bill Clinton in 1996, a strong year for Democrats. It supported John McCain by a margin just under ten points in 2008 over Barack Obama, another Democratic year. In 2012, 54.1% of the county voted for Republican challenger Mitt Romney, and 43.7% voted for Democratic incumbent Obama, again despite it being a Democratic year. In 2016, 59% of the county voted for President Donald Trump while 34% voted for Hillary Clinton. It has not supported a Democrat for president since 1964, and before that it previously did so in 1916.

In some elections, certain towns in Greene County have had a plurality that have voted Democratic, though the county remains very Republican.

Communities

Towns

Villages

Census-designated places

Hamlets

Notable people

  • John Adams, (1778–1854), born in Oak Hill, United States Congressman[19]
  • Levi Hill, claimed early inventor of color photography
  • Jeff "The Drunk" Curro Howard Stern Wack Packer
  • Blossom Dearie, (1924-2009), jazz singer
  • John B. Terry, (1796-1874), pioneer, merchant, soldier, and Wisconsin territorial legislature, born in Coxsackie
  • Thurlow Weed, (1797-1882), born in Acra, NY. Newspaper publisher, politician, and party boss
  • Edwin L. Drake, (1819-1880), invented method to drill oil from the ground, born in Greenville
  • Scott Adams, born and raised in Windham, NY; an American cartoonist, creator of the Dilbert comic strip and the author of several nonfiction works of satire, commentary, business, and general speculation.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. Retrieved October 11, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 143. 
  4. ^ New York. Laws of New York., 1800, 23rd Session, Chapter 51; Page 493
  5. ^ New York. Laws of New York., 1801, 24th Session, Chapter 123, Page 290.
  6. ^ New York. Laws of New York.1812, 35th Session, Chapter 46, Page 382.
  7. ^ New York. Laws of New York.1814, 37th Session, Chapter 211, Page 275.
  8. ^ New York. Laws of New York.1822, 45th Session, Chapter 243, Page 257.
  9. ^ New York. Laws of New York.1823, 46th Session, Chapter 251, Page 377.
  10. ^ New York. Laws of New York.1836, 59th Session, Chapter 31, Page 33.
  11. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 19, 2014. Retrieved January 4, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  13. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved January 4, 2015. 
  14. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 4, 2015. 
  15. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2015. 
  16. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2015. 
  17. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  19. ^ Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963. 

Further reading

  • Beers, Frederick L. (1884). History of Greene County, New York: with biographical sketches of its prominent men. New York: J.B. Beers & Co. 

External links

  • Media related to Greene County, New York at Wikimedia Commons
  • Greene County Government website
  • Greene County Historical Society
  • Greene County History & Genealogy Website
  • Greene County at Curlie (based on DMOZ)
  • Early history of Greene County
  • Hudson Valley Directory, listings pertaining to Greene County, New York

Coordinates: 42°17′N 74°08′W / 42.29°N 74.13°W / 42.29; -74.13

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