Grand Prix of Portland

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Grand Prix of Portland
Portland international raceway.svg
Verizon IndyCar Series
Venue Portland International Raceway
First race 1984
Previous names Stroh's 200 (1984–1985)
Budweiser/G.I. Joe's 200 (1986, 1988–1992, 1994)
Budweiser/G.I. Joe's 200 Presented by Texaco (1987, 1993, 1995–1999)
Freightliner/G.I. Joe's 200 Presented by Texaco (2000–2001)
G.I. Joe's 200 (2002–2003)
Champ Car Grand Prix of Portland (2004)
G.I. Joe's Grand Prix of Portland (2005–2006)
Mazda Grand Prix of Portland (2007)
Most wins (driver) Michael Andretti (3)
Al Unser, Jr. (3)
Most wins (team) Newman/Haas Racing (8)
Most wins (manufacturer) Lola (12)

The Grand Prix of Portland is an Indy Car Series race held at Portland International Raceway in Portland, Oregon. The race was held every year from 1984 through 2007 first as a CART series race, then as part of Champ Car World Series. After a ten-year absence, the race will return to the IndyCar Series for the 2018 season.[1]

Portland is best-remember as being the site of two of the closest finishes on a road course in Indy car racing history. In 1986, Michael Andretti lost fuel pressure on the final turn of the final lap, which allowed his father Mario to catch up and beat him to the finish line by 0.070 seconds. At the time, it was the closest finish of any race in Indy car history. In 1997, in a three-wide finish, Mark Blundell beat second place Gil de Ferran by 0.027 seconds, and beat third place Raul Boesel by 0.055 seconds. For a road course race, it was the all-time closest finish in CART series history, as well as the closest three-car finish in series history.

For nearly its entire existence, the title sponsor of the race was G.I. Joe's sporting goods and auto parts store, and the event was held during or around the Portland Rose Festival. Numerous times, the race was held on Father's Day. Beginning in 2018, the race will be held in September on Labor Day weekend, promoted by Green Savoree Racing Promotions.

Race winners

IndyCar Series

Season Date Driver Team Chassis Engine Race Distance Race Time Average Speed
(mph)
Report
Laps Miles (km)
CART/Champ Car World Series
1984 June 17 United States Al Unser Jr. Galles Racing March Cosworth 104 199.16 (320.516) 1:53:17 105.484 Report
1985 June 16 United States Mario Andretti Newman/Haas Racing Lola Cosworth 104 199.16 (320.516) 1:51:35 107.083 Report
1986 June 15 United States Mario Andretti Newman/Haas Racing Lola Cosworth 104 199.16 (320.516) 1:50:53 107.759 Report
1987 June 14 United States Bobby Rahal Truesports Lola Cosworth 104 199.16 (320.516) 1:50:02 108.59 Report
1988 June 19 United States Danny Sullivan Penske Racing Penske Chevrolet-Ilmor 104 199.888 (321.688) 1:57:17 102.253 Report
1989 June 25 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi Patrick Racing Penske Chevrolet-Ilmor 104 199.888 (321.688) 1:55:20 103.984 Report
1990 June 24 United States Michael Andretti Newman/Haas Racing Lola Chevrolet-Ilmor 104 199.888 (321.688) 1:48:22 110.643 Report
1991 June 23 United States Michael Andretti Newman/Haas Racing Lola Chevrolet-Ilmor 104 199.888 (321.688) 1:44:06 115.208 Report
1992 June 21 United States Michael Andretti Newman/Haas Racing Lola Ford-Cosworth 102 198.9 (320.098) 1:53:25 105.219 Report
1993 June 27 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi Penske Racing Penske Chevrolet-Ilmor 102 198.9 (320.098) 2:03:54 96.312 Report
1994 June 26 United States Al Unser Jr. Penske Racing Penske Mercedes-Benz-Ilmor 102 198.9 (320.098) 1:50:43 107.777 Report
1995 June 25 United States Al Unser Jr. Penske Racing Penske Mercedes-Benz-Ilmor 102 198.9 (320.098) 1:54:49 103.933 Report
1996 June 23 Italy Alex Zanardi Chip Ganassi Racing Reynard Honda 98 191.1 (307.545) 1:50:25 103.837 Report
1997 June 22 United Kingdom Mark Blundell PacWest Racing Reynard Mercedes-Benz-Ilmor 78* 153.426 (246.915) 2:00:12 76.575 Report
1998 June 21 Italy Alex Zanardi Chip Ganassi Racing Reynard Honda 98 192.766 (310.226) 1:54:06 101.355 Report
1999 June 20 Brazil Gil de Ferran Walker Racing Reynard Honda 98 192.962 (310.542) 1:47:44 107.457 Report
2000 June 25 Brazil Gil de Ferran Penske Racing Reynard Honda 112 220.528 (354.905) 2:00:46 109.564 Report
2001 June 24 Italy Max Papis Team Rahal Lola Ford-Cosworth 76* 149.644 (240.828) 2:00:20 74.606 Report
2002 June 16 Brazil Cristiano da Matta Newman/Haas Racing Lola Toyota 110 216.59 (348.567) 2:03:19 105.381 Report
2003 June 22 Mexico Adrián Fernández Fernández Racing Lola Ford-Cosworth 100 196.9 (316.879) 1:56:16 101.602 Report
2004 June 20 France Sébastien Bourdais Newman/Haas Racing Lola Ford-Cosworth 94 185.086 (297.867) 1:45:50 104.923 Report
2005 June 19 Brazil Cristiano da Matta PKV Racing Lola Ford-Cosworth 105 206.22 (331.878) 1:51:51 110.616 Report
2006 June 18 United States A. J. Allmendinger Forsythe Racing Lola Ford-Cosworth 105 206.22 (331.878) 1:48:32 113.989 Report
2007 June 10 France Sébastien Bourdais Newman/Haas Racing Panoz Cosworth 103 202.292 (325.557) 1:45:42 114.816 Report
2008

2017
Not held
IndyCar Series
2018 Sept. 2 TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD Report
[2]

Notes

  • 1997 & 2001: Race shortened due to time limit.

Track length notes

  • 1984–1987: 1.915 mile course
  • 1988–1991: 1.922 mile course
  • 1992–1996: 1.95 mile course
  • 1997–1998: 1.967 mile course
  • 1999–2004: 1.969 mile course
  • 2005–2007: 1.964 mile course

Support races

Race summaries

CART PPG Indy Car World Series

Al Unser Jr. won his first career Indy car race at Portland in 1984. Unser would go on to win three times at Portland.
Mario Andretti won the 1986 race at Portland, the closest finish in Indy car history on a road course at the time.
  • 1984: The CART series debuted at Portland International Raceway in 1984.[5] It was also the first race which CART utilized radial tires.[5] Mario Andretti and Danny Sullivan swept the front row in Lola T-800 machines, the only two Lola chassis in the field.[6] Andretti, however, dropped out early with engine problems, and Sullivan suffered gear box trouble. Al Unser Jr. took the lead for the final time on lap 39, and led all the way to the finish for his first-career Indy car victory. Geoff Brabham finished second.[7]
  • 1985: Mario Andretti passed Al Unser Jr. for the lead with 19 laps to go, and pulled out to a 25-second victory. Unser Jr. led 49 laps, but after his final pit stop, a bad set of tires and fuel concerns forced him to slow his pace. Andretti was trailing by nearly 15 seconds, but a fast final pit stop, and handling adjustments allowed him to quickly close the gap and drive to victory. It was his second win in a row, and his third victory of the 1985 season. Indy 500 winner Danny Sullivan started on the pole position, but dropped out on lap 6 due to steering failure.[8]
  • 1986: In one of the most dramatic finishes in CART history, Mario Andretti beat his son Michael Andretti to the finish line by 0.07 seconds. It was the closest finish in Indy car racing history at the time. With ten laps to go, Michael led Mario by over eight seconds, and looked to be on his way to a dominating victory. Al Unser Jr. was in third position right on the back bumper of Mario. In the closing laps, however, Michael began experiencing fuel pickup problems. Mario and Unser Jr. were charging, and began trimming the lead. At the white flag, Michael still led by three seconds, but his engine was sputtering. As the cars came off the final corner, Michael's engine quit and he began to coast down the inside of the frontstretch. Mario and Unser Jr. raced to the finish line, and Mario nipped Michael at the line by about two feet. Unser came home a close third. In victory lane, a dejected Michael Andretti declared the win a Father's Day gift for Mario.[9][10]
  • 1987: Roberto Guerrero started on the pole position, but Emerson Fittipaldi got the jump at the start and took the lead on the first lap. Fittipaldi led 45 of the first 46 laps until a blown engine ended his day. Guerrero also dropped out early with engine failure. Bobby Rahal took the lead, and led 56 of the final 58 laps to score his first victory of the 1987 season. Rahal built up a lead of over 23 seconds, and lapped all but second place Michael Andretti. Rahal backed off the pace in the closing laps to conserve fuel, and held off Andretti by 6.39 seconds.[11][12]
  • 1988: Danny Sullivan started the race on the pole position, and led the first 13 laps. But as Sullivan was making his way through traffic on lap 14, he nearly clipped wheels with Rocky Moran and did a half spin to the infield grass. Arie Luyendyk slipped by to take the lead, and Al Unser Jr. took over second. Sullivan dropped to third, but the car was undamaged. Luyendyk led 53 laps and appeared poised to win his first Indy car race. With Luyendyk, Unser, and Sullivan running 1st-2nd-3rd, the leaders prepared for their final pit stop. Luyendyk pitted on lap 69, and Unser pitted on lap 70. Unser's pit stop lasted 32 seconds due to a problem with the left rear wheel, and he dropped out of contention. Sullivan pitted on lap 71. The Penske Team's lighting-fast pit stop put Sullivan out ahead of Luyendyk, and Sullivan drove to victory. Luyendyk finished second, his best career finish at the time, but his pace was slowed at the end after he lost third gear.[13]
  • 1989: Teo Fabi scored the first pole position for the Porsche Indy Car team, and led 17 laps, en route to a fourth place finish. Emerson Fittipaldi won the race, crossing the finish line just seconds before his car ran out of fuel. Bobby Rahal finished second, and gave Fittipaldi a ride back to the pits on his sidepod. Minor mishaps made for a wild afternoon, including the asphalt pavement breaking up in the chicane, and a water main break that threatened to flood some of the pit stalls. Scott Pruett tangled with Al Unser Jr. in the chicane on lap 65, sending Unser into the tire barrier with a broken rear wing. Later, Pruett spun out on his own, right in front of Unser, prompting Unser to clap in celebration. Geoff Brabham was driving in substitute for Danny Sullivan who was still recovering from a broken arm at Indianapolis. Brabham was running second with 14 laps to go when radiator problems put him out.[14][15]
Michael Andretti won at Portland three consecutive years (1990, 1991, 1992).
  • 1990: Michael and Mario Andretti, now teammates at Newman Haas Racing, finished 1st-2nd for the second time in an Indy car race. It was the second time it occurred at Portland (after 1986), though this time Michael finished on top. Michael Andretti took the lead at the start, and led 101 of 104 laps.[16]
  • 1991: Michael Andretti made a daring pass at the start of the race, and grabbed the lead from the fourth starting position. Andretti would go on to lead all but two laps, and won at Portland for the second consecutive year. As the field came down the frontstretch to take the green flag, Michael Andretti darted to the middle to pass Scott Pruett, then the field fanned out five-wide. Andretti narrowly squeezed between Rick Mears and pole-sitter Emerson Fittipaldi and emereged with the lead in the chicane. Emerson Fittipaldi finished second. Andretti's only tense moment of the day came around the halfway point. He became mired behind the lapped car of Truesports driver Scott Pruett, which allowed Fittipaldi to close within a few seconds. Pruett, who qualified third and finished eight, had a decent run in the Truesports 91C chassis, holding off Andretti for many laps, but was noticeably down on power with the Judd AV engine.[17][18]
  • 1992: For the third year in a row, Michael Andretti won in dominating fashion. Andretti took the lead at the start and led 100 of 102 laps. It Andretti's first win of the 1992 season, and the first Indy car victory for the new Ford Cosworth XB engine.[19] The 1992 race saw changes to the race track. The chicane near the end of the mainstretch was removed, and replaced by the sharper and longer Festival Curves.[20]
  • 1993: Nigel Mansell started from the pole, and led the first 27 laps. Locked in a close battle with Emerson Fittipaldi, Mansell locked up the brakes on lap 28 going into the Festival Curves, and slid off-course into a row of cones and on to a runoff area. Mansell kept the engine running, and re-joined the race, but Fittipaldi was now in the lead. The skies opened up on lap 45, soaking the course, and forcing the teams to switch to rain tires for the next 25-30 laps. Fittipaldi led 70 of the final 75 laps, and won for the second time at Portland. Mansell charged back to finish in second place.[21][22]
  • 1994: Team Penske swept the podium with Al Unser Jr. winning, Emerson Fittipaldi second, and Paul Tracy third. Unser grabbed the lead at the start and led 96 laps en route to victory. Unser made his final pit stop on lap 69. Fittipaldi made his stop one lap later, and for a moment appeared that he would emerge as the leader. Unser on warmer tires, passed Fittipaldi coming out of the Festival Curves, and led the rest of the way.[23][24]
  • 1995: Al Unser Jr. dominated the race, leading 76 of the 102 laps, and beat second place Jimmy Vasser by over 28 seconds. However, Unser's car failed post-race inspection due to insufficient ground clearance. Unser was stripped of the victory, and Jimmy Vasser was elevated to the winner, his first-career Indy car triumph.[25][26] Throughout the race, Unser's machine was observed bottoming out, and on lap 90, a portion of the plywood skidpad flew off the bottom of the car.[25][26] Vasser was informed of the decision three hours after the race.[27] Team Penske protested the ruling, claiming that the skidpad damage was caused by a bumpy track surface. The appeals process dragged out through the summer, and in August, CART officials formally denied the appeal.[28] The case was then sent to a three-member panel for a second appeal.[29] The panel ruled that the CART technicians used inconsistent methods to measure Unser's car versus the other cars in the field. The panel re-instated the victory, and 21 championship points, to Unser on September 22. The ruling did not change the championship standings, however, as Unser would finish second in points with or without the victory.[30]
  • 1996: Rookie Alex Zanardi won his first CART series race, leading 88 of the 102 laps. About 30 laps into the race, a rain shower swept over the track, but Zanardi elected not to switch to rain tires. His 17-second lead evaporated, and Al Unser Jr. passed Zanardi for the lead on 39. The lead was short-lived, as Unser's rain tires began to fall off. Two laps later, Zanardi was back in the lead, and the rain soon stopped. Zanardi pulled away for a 9-second win over Gil de Ferran.[31][32]

CART Fedex Championship Series

Mark Blundell's dramatic victory in 1997 was the closest 1-2-3 finish in CART series history at the time.
  • 1997: The race was the closest finish in the history of the CART series on a road course, as well as the closest three-car finish of any Indy car race at the time. Rain fell most of the day, making for a slick track, resulting in several spins and numerous off-course excursions. Late in the race, Gil de Ferran led with Christian Fittipaldi close behind in second, but the race was approaching the two-hour time limit. With the track slowly starting to dry, some teams elected gamble and change to slick tires. Paul Tracy, Maurício Gugelmin, Alex Zanardi, and others all came out on slicks and proceeded to spin off course. On lap 68 Mark Blundell also switched to slicks, and he too attempted to chase down the leaders. The race was set to end early at the completion of lap 78. With two laps to go, Blundell had caught up to de Ferran and Fittipaldi, but was carefully trying to maneuver around traffic and stay on course. Blundell passed Fittipaldi for second in turn ten. Meanwhile, Raul Boesel was closing in on the leaders as well. Gil de Ferran took the white flag with Mark Blundell charging behind him. Nose-to-tale and side-by-side on the final lap, de Ferran fought hard to hold off Blundell. Boesel slipped by Fittipaldi for third place in turn nine, and quickly closed in behind the two leaders. Coming off the final turn of the final lap, the finish became a three-wide drag race between de Ferran, Blundell, and Boesel. Mark Blundell nosed ahead at the finish line and beat Gil de Ferran by 0.027 seconds. Boesel crossed the finish line third, only 0.055 seconds behind. it was Blundell's first CART series victory, and first professional win since the 1992 24 Hours of Le Mans.[33][34]
  • 1998: At the start, Greg Moore's car veered to the inside, then wildly hopped the curbing going into the Festival Curves. Moore crashed out himself along with Paul Tracy and Christian Fittipaldi. At least four other cars were involved, including Michael Andretti who was hit and stalled in the gravel trap. Polesitter Bryan Herta led the first 13 laps, but his Team Rahal crew decided to pit during a caution on lap 14 and make it a three-stop race. The pit strategy backfired, however, and Herta spent most of the day trying to catch back up to the lead. Alex Zanardi, utilizing a two-stop strategy, was leading the race when Dario Franchitti had a frightening crash on lap 73. Franchitti clipped wheels with P. J. Jones, and slammed into the outside barrier near turn ten. Herta immediately ducked into the pits during the resulting caution, and bunched up behind Zanardi for the subsequent restart. Zanardi got the jump on the restart, while Herta was help up behind the lapped car car Richie Hearn. Gil de Ferran pounced on Herta, but the two cars tangled in the Festival Curves. Scott Pruett slipped by to take second, while Zanardi went on to win. Herta recovered to finish third.[35]
  • 1999: With most teams employing a two-stop, fuel conservation strategy, Gil de Ferran of Walker Racing decided to scuttle the fuel conservation and drive all-out for the lead. With less than ten laps to go, de Ferran had built up a 29-second lead over second place Juan Pablo Montoya, but needed one final pit stop for fuel. On lap 90, de Ferran came in for a splash-and-go stop for fuel, and remarkably came out on the track seven seconds ahead of Montoya. Gil de Ferran held on over the final 8 laps and scored his first CART series victory in three years, and the first win for Walker Racing since Robby Gordon at Detroit in 1995.[36]
  • 2000: In an effort to take fuel strategy off the table, the race was lengthened from 98 to 112 laps. One driver, however, Roberto Moreno, still attempted to finish the race with only two pit stops. Gil de Ferran, now with Penske Racing, mimicked his strategy from the previous year, and raced all-out, all along planning three pit stops. In the closing laps, the leaders started cycling through a series of splash-and-go pit stops. Gil de Ferran pitted on lap 89, while race leader Hélio Castroneves pitted on lap 105. The lead went to Gil de Ferran, while Moreno stayed out and moved up to second. The victory went to de Ferran, his second consecutive win at Portland. After leading 85 laps, Castroneves ran out of fuel on the final lap and finished a distant 7th place.[37][38]
  • 2001: Steady rain made for a slippy course, resulting in several spins and crashes, and nine caution periods. The race was shortened from 98 to 76 laps due to the two-hour time limit, and Max Papis emerged as the winner. Papis started on the pole position and avoided all the melees, and made only one pit stop en route to victory. Papis held off Roberto Moreno, who finished second at Portland for the second year in a row.[39]
  • 2002: Cristiano da Matta started from the pole, but Kenny Bräck grabbed the lead at the start. Brack controversially caused the start to be waved off three times for not being properly in line. Then on the fourth start attempt, a collision deep in the field sent three cars spinning and three to the escape road. Brack led 55 of the first 59 laps. On lap 60, Brack, Cristiano da Matta, and Bruno Junqueira all came in the pits, running 1-2-3. Brack came out first, but while accelerating into the Festival Curves, lost the left rear wheel which was not properly fastened. Cristiano de Matta led the rest of the way, holding of Junquiera by 0.625 seconds for the victory.[40]
  • 2003: Adrián Fernández passed Paul Tracy going into the Festival Curves on lap 86, and drove to victory, the first CART series win by an owner/driver since 1992. The pass came one lap after a restart, and Tracy came home second. Tracy started on the pole position and led 42 laps, but he was penalized on lap 44 for a pit exit infraction. In a battle for the lead with Michel Jourdain Jr., Tracy cut off Jourdain in the pit lane, swinging out of his pit box directly to the outside fast lane, which was against the rules. One lap later, Jourdain and Tracy went side-by-side into the Festival Curves, and locked wheels, sending Jourdain spinning and out of contention.[41][42]

Champ Car World Series

Sébastien Bourdais is a two-time winner at Portland (2004, 2007).
  • 2004: Sébastien Bourdais started on the pole position and won the race, his first victory at Portland. Bourdais led 85 of the 94 laps, on a hot, slick day. Bruno Junqueira, who started second, was charging near the end on the alternate "red" tires. Bourdais at one point held an 8.8-second advantage, but Junqueira closed the gap. With two laps to go, Junqueira set the fastest lap of the race, but Bourdais held on at the finish line to win by 1.247 seconds.[43]
  • 2005: Justin Wilson started on the pole and led 43 of the first 45 laps. But Wilson dropped out with an oil pump failure on lap 46. Cristiano da Matta drove to victory, his second win at Portland.[44]
  • 2006: One week after being fired at RuSPORT, A. J. Allmendinger switched to the Forsythe team, and subsequently drove to victory at Portland, his first win in Champ Car. It was the first of three consecutive wins on the 2006 Champ Car season, and five overall with the team. Allmendinger led 100 of the 105 laps, and beat his former RuSPORT teammate Justin Wilson by 5.420 seconds.[45]
  • 2007: The final Champ Car race at Portland was the milestone 100th victory for Newman/Haas Racing. Sébastien Bourdais took the lead on lap 57, and cruised to victory. It was the first and only time the Champ Car race at Portland began with a standing start. The race went without a caution, and Bourdais beat second place Justin Wilson by 13.537 seconds.[46]

Verizon IndyCar Series

  • 2018: After a ten-year absence, Portland returns to the Indy car calendar. The race will be held Labor Day weekend, and replaced Watkins Glen on the schedule.

Broadcasting

Year Network Lap-by-lap Color commentator(s) Pit reporters
1984 ESPN Art Eckman Larry Nuber Gary Lee
1985 ESPN Bob Jenkins Larry Nuber Jack Arute
Gary Lee
1986 ESPN Bob Jenkins Derek Daly Jack Arute
1987 ESPN Bob Jenkins Larry Nuber Gary Lee
1988 ESPN Bob Jenkins Johnny Rutherford Gary Lee
Larry Nuber
1989 ESPN Paul Page Johnny Rutherford Jack Arute
Gary Gerould
1990 ESPN Paul Page Derek Daly Dr. Jerry Punch
Sally Larvick
1991 ESPN Paul Page Derek Daly Gary Gerould
Jon Beekhuis
1992 ESPN Paul Page Derek Daly Gary Gerould
Jon Beekhuis
1993 ESPN Paul Page Derek Daly Gary Gerould
Jon Beekhuis
1994 ESPN Paul Page Derek Daly Gary Gerould
Jon Beekhuis
1995 ESPN Paul Page Derek Daly Gary Gerould
Jon Beekhuis
1996 ABC Paul Page Danny Sullivan Jack Arute
Gary Gerould
1997 ESPN Bob Varsha Danny Sullivan Gary Gerould
Marty Reid
1998 ESPN Bob Varsha Danny Sullivan
Tommy Kendall
Jack Arute
Gary Gerould
1999 ABC Paul Page Parker Johnstone Jon Beekhuis
Gary Gerould
2000 ESPN2 Paul Page Parker Johnstone Jon Beekhuis
Gary Gerould
2001 ESPN Paul Page Parker Johnstone Jon Beekhuis
Gary Gerould
2002 CBS Bob Varsha Derek Daly Ralph Sheheen
Jon Beekhuis
2003 CBS Bob Varsha Tommy Kendall Derek Daly
Calvin Fish
2004 SpikeTV Rick Benjamin Tommy Kendall Jon Beekhuis
Chris McClure
Bronte Tagliani
2005 CBS Rick Benjamin Jon Beekhuis Chris McClure
Ralph Sheheen
2006 CBS Rick Benjamin Derek Daly Jon Beekhuis
Cameron Steele
Michelle Beisner
2007 ABC Rick Benjamin Jon Beekhuis Bill Stephens
Cameron Steele
Michelle Beisner
2018 NBCSN Leigh Diffey Townsend Bell
Paul Tracy
Katie Hargitt
Kevin Lee
Robin Miller
Jon Beekhuis

References

  1. ^ Blue, Molly (October 12, 2017). "IndyCar racing will return to Portland International Raceway on Labor Day weekend 2018". The Oregonian. Advance Publications. Retrieved October 12, 2017. 
  2. ^ "Portland International Raceway". Champ Car Stats. Archived from the original on 7 June 2011. Retrieved 7 June 2011. 
  3. ^ "Portland International Raceway (Indy Lights)". Champ Car Stats. Archived from the original on 7 June 2011. Retrieved 7 June 2011. 
  4. ^ "Portland International Raceway (Atlantic)". Champ Car Stats. Archived from the original on 7 June 2011. Retrieved 7 June 2011. 
  5. ^ a b "Mario sets pace for Portland race". The Indianapolis Star. June 16, 1984. p. 32. Retrieved February 6, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  6. ^ "Lolas fastest for CART go at Portland". The Indianapolis Star. June 17, 1984. p. 68. Retrieved February 6, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  7. ^ "Unser Jr. captures first Indy-car race". The Indianapolis Star. June 18, 1994. p. 17. Retrieved February 6, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  8. ^ "Mario overhauls Unser at Portland". The Indianapolis Star. June 17, 1995. p. 17. Retrieved February 6, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  9. ^ Miller, Robin (June 15, 1986). "Mario gets gift, title from Michael (Part 1)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 21. Retrieved February 6, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  10. ^ Miller, Robin (June 15, 1986). "Mario gets gift, title from Michael (Part 2)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 22. Retrieved February 6, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  11. ^ Benner, Bill (June 17, 1995). "Rahal gets 1st victory of season (Part 1)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 17. Retrieved February 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  12. ^ Benner, Bill (June 17, 1995). "Rahal gets 1st victory of season (Part 2)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 21. Retrieved February 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
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  14. ^ "Fittipaldi (again) wins at Portland (Part 1)". The Indianapolis Star. June 26, 1989. p. 13. Retrieved February 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  15. ^ "Fittipaldi (again) wins at Portland (Part 2)". The Indianapolis Star. June 26, 1989. p. 14. Retrieved February 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  16. ^ "Andrettis give Portland the ol' 1-2". The Indianapolis Star. June 25, 1990. p. 16. Retrieved February 12, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  17. ^ Baum, Bob (June 24, 1991). "Michael Andretti wows 'em for Portland win (Part 1)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 9. Retrieved February 12, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  18. ^ Baum, Bob (June 24, 1991). "Michael Andretti wows 'em for Portland win (Part 2)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 10. Retrieved February 12, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  19. ^ Baum, Bob (June 22, 1992). "Michael earns first '92 win at Portland". The Indianapolis Star. p. 13. Retrieved February 13, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  20. ^ Baum, Bob (June 19, 1992). "Michael is hoping to stop slide at Portland IndyCar race". The Indianapolis Star. p. 48. Retrieved February 13, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  21. ^ Harris, Mike (June 28, 1993). "Fittipaldi fights off Mansell for checkered flag (Part 1)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 9. Retrieved February 13, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  22. ^ Harris, Mike (June 28, 1993). "Fittipaldi fights off Mansell for checkered flag (Part 2)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 10. Retrieved February 13, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  23. ^ Harris, Mike (June 27, 1994). "Say it again: Penske-owned cars finish 1-2-3 (Part 1)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 9. Retrieved February 13, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  24. ^ Harris, Mike (June 27, 1994). "Say it again: Penske-owned cars finish 1-2-3 (Part 2)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 10. Retrieved February 13, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  25. ^ a b Harris, Mike (June 26, 1995). "Unser Jr. bumped from victory (Part 1)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 27. Retrieved February 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  26. ^ a b Harris, Mike (June 26, 1995). "Unser Jr. bumped from victory (Part 2)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 29. Retrieved February 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  27. ^ Miller, Robin (June 27, 1995). "Excuse me, sir, but you won the race". The Indianapolis Star. p. 13. Retrieved February 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  28. ^ "Unser's disqualification upheld by IndyCar panel". The Indianapolis Star. August 2, 1995. p. 16. Retrieved February 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
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  30. ^ "Better late than never for Al Unser Jr". The Indianapolis Star. September 23, 1995. p. 48. Retrieved February 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
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  33. ^ Mittman, Dick (June 23, 1997). "Blundell slips to his first CART victory (Part 1)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 13. Retrieved February 15, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  34. ^ Mittman, Dick (June 23, 1997). "Blundell slips to his first CART victory (Part 2)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 15. Retrieved February 15, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  35. ^ Baum, Bob (June 22, 1998). "Strategy in pits helps Zanardi win 4th race this year". The Indianapolis Star. p. 20. Retrieved February 19, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  36. ^ Harris, Mike (June 21, 1999). "Risky strategy in pits plays off for de Ferran". The Indianapolis Star. p. 10. Retrieved February 19, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  37. ^ Miller, Robin (June 26, 2000). "De Ferran strategy pays off in victory (Part 1)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 25. Retrieved February 20, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  38. ^ Miller, Robin (June 26, 2000). "De Ferran strategy pays off in victory (Part 2)". The Indianapolis Star. p. 26. Retrieved February 20, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  39. ^ Hall, Landon (June 25, 2001). "Papis starts up front and finishes there". The Indianapolis Star. p. 20. Retrieved February 20, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
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  46. ^ "Bourdais gives team 100th victory". The Indianapolis Star. June 11, 2007. p. D8. Retrieved February 23, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read

External links

  • Official Site
Preceded by
Bommarito Automotive Group 500
IndyCar Series
Grand Prix of Portland
Succeeded by
GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma

Coordinates: 45°35′49″N 122°41′45″W / 45.59694°N 122.69583°W / 45.59694; -122.69583

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