Gordie Hogg

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Gordie Hogg
MP
Gordon-hogg.jpg
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for South Surrey—White Rock
Assumed office
December 11, 2017
Preceded by Dianne Watts
Member of the British Columbia Legislative Assembly
for Surrey-White Rock
In office
September 15, 1997 – May 9, 2017
Preceded by Wilf Hurd
Succeeded by Tracy Redies
Minister of Children and Family Development
In office
June 5, 2001 – January 26, 2004
Premier Gordon Campbell
Succeeded by Christy Clark
8th Mayor of White Rock
In office
1984–1993
Preceded by Tom Kirstein
Succeeded by Hardy Staub
Personal details
Born (1946-08-24) August 24, 1946 (age 72)
New Westminster, British Columbia
Political party Liberal Party of Canada
Other political
affiliations
British Columbia Liberal Party
Spouse(s) LaVerne Hogg
Residence White Rock, British Columbia
Occupation Politician

Gordon "Gordie" Hogg MP (born August 24, 1946) is a Canadian politician, who currently serves as the Member of Parliament for South Surrey—White Rock in the House of Commons of Canada, as a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. He previously served in the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia as the MLA for Surrey-White Rock from 1997 until 2017, as a member of the British Columbia Liberal Party.[1]

Early life

Hogg was a counsellor, probation officer and regional director for corrections prior to his election to the Legislative Assembly. He received his bachelor of arts in sociology and psychology from the University of British Columbia and his master's degree in psychology from Antioch College. At the age of 70, while working as a Member of Legislative Assembly, he completed an interdisciplinary doctorate that focused on public policy from Simon Fraser University.

Hogg and his wife LaVerne live in White Rock and have one son. His father Al Hogg was a prominent physician in White Rock honoured with the naming of a residential care facility at Peace Arch Hospital.

Political career

Hogg served on White Rock city council for 20 years, for 10 of which he was mayor. He has been a board member of more than 15 committees and non-profit societies, including the Peace Arch Community Health Council and Peace Arch Hospital. He has also been a foster parent and Little League coach.

He first ran for federal office under the Liberal banner in the riding of Surrey—White Rock—South Langley in 1993, placing second behind Reform candidate Val Meredith.

He was first elected to the British Columbia Legislative Assembly in a 1997 by-election, and held the seat for twenty years. At various times he served as Parliamentary Secretary for Not for Profit-Public Partnerships, Minister of State for Mining, Minister of State for ActNowBC and Minister of Children and Family Development in the government of Gordon Campbell.[2]

Hogg announced in October 2016 that he would not seek re-election in 2017. The BC Liberals chose Tracy Redies, former CEO of Coast Capital Savings, as the next candidate for the riding.[3]

In 2017, Hogg was selected as the federal Liberal candidate in a by-election in South Surrey—White Rock created by the resignation of incumbent Conservative MP Dianne Watts.[4] He won the by-election on December 11, 2017.[5]

Electoral record

Canadian federal by-election, 2017: South Surrey—White Rock
Resignation of Dianne Watts
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Gordie Hogg 14,369 47.49 +6.00
Conservative Kerry-Lynne Findlay 12,752 42.14 -1.89
New Democratic Jonathan Silveira 1,478 4.88 -5.53
Green Larry Colero 1,247 4.12 +0.70
Christian Heritage Rod Taylor 238 0.79
Libertarian Donald Wilson 89 0.29 -0.17
Progressive Canadian Michael Huenefeld 86 0.28 +0.09
Total valid votes/Expense limit 30,259 100.00
Total rejected ballots
Turnout 30,259 38.13 -36.60
Eligible voters 79,359
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +1.40


British Columbia general election, 2013: Surrey-White Rock
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal Gordon Hogg 15092 58.09
New Democratic Susan Keeping 7180 27.63
Green Don Pitcairn 2304 8.87
Conservative Elizabeth Morales Pagtakhan 1301 5.01
British Columbia Party Jim Laurence 105 0.40
Total valid votes 25982 100.00
Total rejected ballots 74 0.28
Turnout 26056 64.73
Source: Elections BC[6]
British Columbia general election, 2009: Surrey-White Rock
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Gordon Hogg 15,121 62.05 +4.19
New Democratic Drina Allen 6,668 27.36 +0.96
Green Don Pitcairn 2,118 8.69 −2.03
Reform David Charles Hawkins 464 1.90
Total 24,371 100.00
Source:"2009 Official Election Results for Surrey-White Rock". Elections BC. 5 June 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2009. [dead link]
British Columbia general election, 2005: Surrey-White Rock
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Gordon Hogg 16,462 57.86 −10.84
New Democratic Moh Chelali 7,511 26.40 +13.24
Green Ashley Brie Hughes 3,051 10.72 −2.44
Conservative David James Evans 1,340 4.71
Democratic Reform Ronald Edward Dunsford 87 0.31
Total 28,451 100.00
B.C. General Election 2001: Surrey-White Rock
Party Candidate Votes % ± Expenditures
Liberal Gordon J. Hogg 18,678 68.70 +10.66 $46,685
Green Ruth Christine 3,577 13.16 +10.98 $2,700
  NDP Matt Todd 3,415 12.56 -13.87 $5,509
Unity Garry Sahl 983 3.62 -
Marijuana David Bourgeois 536 1.96 - $394
Total valid votes 27,189 100.00
Total rejected ballots 91 0.33
Turnout 27,280 77.64
Canadian federal election, 1993: Surrey—White Rock—South Langley
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Reform Val Meredith 31,916 43.92 +37.61
Liberal Gordon Hogg 24,648 33.91 +10.42
Progressive Conservative Norm Blain 8,859 12.19 −31.29
New Democratic Mota Jheeta 3,046 4.20 −20.13
National Carolyn Goertzen 2,387 3.28
Christian Heritage Heather Stilwell 871 1.20 −0.20
Green Steve Chitty 464 0.64 +0.21
Natural Law Derek Nadeau 252 0.35
Canada Party Farlie Paynter 68 0.09
Marxist–Leninist Charles Boylan 67 0.09
Independent Rhonda Thiessen 61 0.08
Commonwealth of Canada Giancarlo Dalla Valle 37 0.05
Total valid votes 72,676 100.00  
Reform gain from Progressive Conservative Swing +13.60

References

  1. ^ "Liberals win B.C. byelection easily". Waterloo Region Record. 16 September 1997. p. 4. Retrieved 17 March 2011.
  2. ^ 'Broccoli minister' Hogg aims to drop 20 pounds:: [Final Edition] Inwood, Damian. The Province [Vancouver, B.C] 25 Aug 2006: A10.
  3. ^ Browne, Alex (October 31, 2016). "BC Liberals choose business veteran as Surrey-White Rock candidate". Peace Arch News. Retrieved 2 January 2017.
  4. ^ Mall, Rattan (November 5, 2017). "Gordon Hogg selected by federal Liberals as their candidate in South Surrey-White Rock". Voice Online. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
  5. ^ "Liberal Gordie Hogg defeats former Tory cabinet minister in South Surrey-White Rock". The Hill Times, December 11, 2017.
  6. ^ "Statement of Votes - 40th Provincial General Election" (PDF). Elections BC. Retrieved 17 May 2017.

External links

  • MLA Gordon Hogg
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