Godflesh discography

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Godflesh discography
Two images composited together. The first is of G. C. Green playing bass with Godflesh, and the second is of Justin Broadrick playing guitar with Godflesh.
Godflesh performing reunion concerts in the early 2010s. Left to right: G. C. Green and Justin Broadrick
Studio albums 8
Live albums 2
Compilation albums 3
Video albums 1
Music videos 5
EPs 6
Singles 12
Remix albums 2

The English industrial metal band Godflesh have released eight studio albums and six extended plays along with a number of singles, compilations and remix and live albums. The group formed in 1982 under the name Fall of Because, but they did not release any music (outside of a 1986 demo tape titled Extirpate)[1] until 1988 when Justin Broadrick and G. C. Green changed the project's name to Godflesh and recorded a self-titled debut EP.[2] That EP, released through the independent label Swordfish, was met with underground success and has since been recognised as one of the first industrial metal releases, if not the first.[3][4][5]

Though the self-titled EP acted as Godflesh's introduction to innovation and experimentation, their next release and first through Earache Records, 1989's Streetcleaner, garnered even more recognition for its musical importance.[6][7][8] After the success of Streetcleaner, Godflesh recorded Pure in 1992, which has drawn retrospective recognition as a significant release in the post-metal genre.[9][10] The band's third album, Selfless (1994), was Godflesh's debut on Columbia Records.[11] The album sold under expectations,[12] and that coupled with MTV banning the music video of its lead single, "Crush My Soul", led to Columbia dropping support of Godflesh.[11][13] Regardless of the disappointing commercial performance of Selfless, Broadrick considers that album and all of the preceding releases as Godflesh's best material.[14][15]

In 1996, Godflesh, back on Earache, released Songs of Love and Hate, which featured Bryan Mantia on drums; this was a significant departure from the band's characteristic style, since all of their previous releases had been structured around programmed industrial beats from a drum machine.[16] Broadrick later described this shift as a dilution of Godflesh's original goal, which was to meld human and machine music.[17] Love and Hate in Dub, a remix album released in 1997, saw Godflesh again experimenting, this time with hip hop, breakbeats and dub.[18][19] Those experiments continued and heightened with the 1999 studio album Us and Them, which again featured machine percussion.[20] After Us and Them proved creatively dissatisfying for Broadrick,[21] the band found a new live drummer (this time in Ted Parsons). Hymns (2001) was recorded in a professional studio, which led to a great deal of frustration for the band.[22][23] Shortly after Hymns' release, Green quit Godflesh, and Broadrick officially ended the band not long after that.[24]

Godflesh reformed in 2010 as Broadrick and Green.[25] After performing scattered shows for four years, the band's return album, A World Lit Only by Fire (2014), was released to critical acclaim and appeared on several critics' year-end lists.[26][27] It was a notably heavy industrial metal album focused again on downtuned guitar, distorted bass and driving machine drums.[28][29] In 2017, Godflesh's eighth album, Post Self, was released. Like A World Lit Only by Fire, it drew critical praise and award recognition;[30][31] unlike that previous album, however, Post Self proved introspective and experimental.[32] Despite regular acclaim from critics and fellow musicians, Godflesh have received only minor commercial success.[33]

Albums

Studio albums

Title Album details Peak chart positions Notes
UK Indie
[34][35]
GRE
[36]
US Heat
[37]
US Taste
[38]
Streetcleaner 19 45
  • CD versions include the otherwise unreleased Tiny Tears EP as a set of bonus tracks[39]
  • Remastered and reissued in 2010 with a second disc of bonus tracks[40]
  • Was performed in its entirety at Roadburn 2011[41]
Pure
Selfless 12
Songs of Love and Hate
Us and Them
  • Again featured machine percussion[20]
  • Intended to be followed by a remix album entitled Us and Them in Dub, but it was never completed[44]
Hymns
  • Godflesh's final album before dissolution in 2002[24]
  • The band's second and final album with a live drummer[24]
  • Remastered and reissued in 2013 with a second disc of bonus tracks[45]
A World Lit Only by Fire 22 25
  • Intended to be followed by a remix album entitled A World Lit Only by Fire in Dub, but it was never completed[17]
Post Self 23
"—" denotes a title that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Extended plays

Title EP details UK Indie
[34]
Notes
Godflesh
  • Released: 1988
  • Label: Swordfish (FLESH LP1)
  • Format: CD, vinyl
20
  • Godflesh's debut and one of the originating industrial metal releases[3][4][5]
  • Reissued in 1990 with two bonus tracks after Earache Records acquired Godflesh[47]
Slavestate
  • Most releases include Slavestate Remixes and the "Slateman" single[48]
Cold World
  • Recorded in 1991 during the Pure sessions[49]
Merciless
  • Title track derived from a Fall of Because (pre-Godflesh) song[1]
Messiah
  • Recorded in 1994 during the Selfless sessions[50]
  • Released in a limited fan club capacity in 2000[51]
  • Received a large-scale release in 2003[52]
Decline & Fall
  • Godflesh's first original material since 2001's Hymns[53]
  • Recorded in 2014 during the A World Lit Only by Fire sessions[54]
"—" denotes a title that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Remix albums

Title Album details Notes
Slavestate Remixes
  • Only received limited release as a 12-inch vinyl with unique artwork, but was included on most issues of Slavestate[48]
Love and Hate in Dub

Compilation albums

Title Album details Notes
The Ten Commandments
  • Only a promotional release[56]
  • Cover artwork is a still frame from the music video for "Crush My Soul"[56]
Life Is Easy
  • A compilation of Fall of Because (pre-Godflesh) demos originally released in 1986 under the title Extirpate[12]
In All Languages
  • The first disc comprises a best-of collection, the second comprises a selection of rare and otherwise unreleased tracks and an additional DVD or VHS comprises the band's music videos[57]

Live albums

Title Album details Notes
Streetcleaner: Live at Roadburn 2011
  • Documents the band's 2011 Roadburn performance of Streetcleaner in its entirety[41]
Godflesh – The Earache Peel Sessions

Singles

Title Year Album Notes
"Pulp" / "Christbait Rising" 1989 Streetcleaner
  • Only a 12-inch promotional release[60]
"Slateman" 1991 Non-album single
  • Was included on most issues of Slavestate[48]
  • Cover photograph taken during a 1991 live performance where Godflesh opened for the grunge band Nirvana[61]
"Straight to Your Heart" Loopflesh / Fleshloop
  • Two-track split with the English space rock band Loop[62]
  • First side features Loop covering Godflesh's "Like Rats", while the second features Godflesh covering Loop's "Straight to Your Heart" from Heaven's End (1987)[62]
"Mothra" 1992 Pure
"Xnoybis" 1995 Selfless
"Crush My Soul"
"F.O.D. (Fuck of Death)" 2013 Non-album single
"Ringer" 2014 Decline & Fall
"New Dark Ages" A World Lit Only by Fire
"Imperator"
"Post Self" 2017 Post Self
"Be God"

References

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  52. ^ Messiah (CD liner notes). Godflesh. Relapse Records. 2003. RR 6564-2.CS1 maint: others (link)
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External links

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