Geography of the Cook Islands

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Cook-Islands-map.gif

The Cook Islands can be divided into two groups: the Southern Cook Islands and the Northern Cook Islands.

Southern Cook Islands

Northern Cook Islands

Location

Oceania, group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean, about one-half of the way from Hawaii to New Zealand

Geography

Geographic coordinates
21°14′S 159°46′W / 21.233°S 159.767°W / -21.233; -159.767
Map references
Oceania
Area
  • Total: 236 km2 (91 sq mi)
  • Land: 236 km2
  • Water: 0 km2
Area - comparative
1.3 times the size of Washington, DC
Land boundaries
0 km
Coastline
120 km (75 mi)
Maritime claims
  • Territorial sea: 12 nmi (22.2 km; 13.8 mi)
  • Continental shelf: 200 nmi (370.4 km; 230.2 mi) or to the edge of the continental margin
  • Exclusive economic zone: 200 nmi (370.4 km; 230.2 mi)
Climate
Tropical; moderated by trade winds; a dry season from April to November and a more humid season from December to March
Terrain
Low coral atolls in north; volcanic, hilly islands in south
Elevation extremes
  • Lowest point: Pacific Ocean 0 m
  • Highest point: Te Manga 652 m (2,139 ft)
Natural resources
coconuts
Land use
  • Arable land: 4.17%
  • Permanent crops: 4.17%
  • Other: 91.67% (2012 est.)
Irrigated land
NA
Natural hazards
Typhoons (November to March)
Environment - current issues
NA
Environment - international agreements


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