First Van Agt cabinet

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First Van Agt cabinet
Van Agt–Wiegel cabinet
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
56th cabinet of the Netherlands
Kabinet-Van Agt I.jpg ZetelsVanAgtI.svg
The installation of the Van Agt–Wiegel cabinet on 19 December 1977
Date formed 19 December 1977 (1977-12-19)
Date dissolved 11 September 1981 (1981-09-11)
(Demissionary from 26 May 1981 (1981-05-26))
People and organisations
Head of state Queen Juliana (1977–1980)
Queen Beatrix (1980–1981)
Head of government Dries van Agt
Deputy head of government Hans Wiegel
No. of ministers 17
Ministers removed
(Death/resignation/dismissal)
5
Total no. of ministers 21
Member party Christian Democratic Appeal
(CDA)
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy

(VVD)
Status in legislature Right-wing Majority government
Opposition party Labour Party
Opposition leader Joop den Uyl
History
Election(s) 1977 election
Outgoing election 1981 election
Legislature term(s) 1977–1981
Incoming formation 1977 formation
Outgoing formation 1981 formation
Predecessor Den Uyl cabinet
Successor Second Van Agt cabinet
Azure, billetty Or a lion with a coronet Or armed and langued Gules holding in his dexter paw a sword Argent hilted Or and in the sinister paw seven arrows Argent pointed and bound together Or. [The seven arrows stand for the seven provinces of the Union of Utrecht.] The shield is crowned with the (Dutch) royal crown and supported by two lions Or armed and langued gules. They stand on a scroll Azure with the text (Or) "Je Maintiendrai" (French for "I will maintain".)
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the Netherlands

The First Van Agt cabinet, also called the Van Agt–Wiegel cabinet was the cabinet of the Netherlands from 19 December 1977 until 11 September 1981. The cabinet was formed by the political parties Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) and the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) after the election of 1977. The right-wing cabinet was a majority government in the House of Representatives. The Van Agt–Wiegel cabinet was the first to be composed of the newly formed Christian Democratic Appeal, which was formed from the Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP), the Catholic People's Party (KVP) and the Christian Historical Union (CHU) on 11 October 1980. It was the first of three cabinets of Dries van Agt, the Leader of the Christian Democratic Appeal as Prime Minister, with Hans Wiegel the Leader of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy serving as Deputy Prime Minister.[1]

Formation

After the 1977 general election the Labour Party (PvdA) of incumbent Prime Minister Joop den Uyl was the winner of the election which won ten new seats and had now a total of 53 seats. The People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) of Hans Wiegel won six seats and had now 28 seats. The Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP), Catholic People's Party (KVP) and the Christian Historical Union (CHU) participated for the first time as the combined party Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) with Dries van Agt as its new Leader. This electoral fusion resulted in one new seat and now had a total of 49 seats in the House of Representatives. A long negotiation between the Labour Party and Christian Democratic Appeal followed. Both parties had come out of the elections as equal partners. The negotiations were troubled by the personal animosity between incumbent Prime Minister and Leader of the Labour Party Joop den Uyl and the Leader of the Christian Democratic Appeal Dries van Agt. Van Agt who served as Deputy Prime Minister under Den Uyl his cabinet had a bad working relationship. In the end Van Agt found that the demands of the Den Uyl were too great and instead he formed a coalition with the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy.

Term

The cabinet had to deal with a major economic depression, but refused to cut government spending due to fierce left-wing opposition in the parliament, which had nearly half of the seats. Many left-wing demonstrations were held on the street against the government. Notorious were the harsh demonstrations in Amsterdam during the crowning of Queen Beatrix and the squatting riots. There was a sharp increase in unemployment and the government was seen to have created too much debt.

Changes

On 5 March 1978 Minister of Defence Roelof Kruisinga (CHU) resigned in-protest after the cabinet decided to not publicly condemn the United States for further developing the Neutron bomb. Minister for Development Cooperation Jan de Koning (ARP) served as acting Minister of Defence until 8 March 1978 when Member of the Council of State Willem Scholten (CHU) was appointed as his successor.

On 1 April 1979 Minister for Science Policy Rinus Peijnenburg (KVP) unexpectedly died from a heart attack at the age of 51. Minister of Health and Environment Leendert Ginjaar (VVD) served as acting Minister for Science Policy until 3 May 1979 when Ton van Trier, who until then had been working as a professor of electrical engineering at the Eindhoven University of Technology was installed as his successor. Ton van Trier a Independent Christian Democrat joined the Catholic People's Party that same month.

On 22 February 1980 Minister of Finance Frans Andriessen (KVP) resigned after disagreeing with the cabinets decision to not implement a stronger austerity policy. State Secretary for Finance Ad Nooteboom (CHU) declares his solidarity with Frans Andriessen and also resigned that same day. Minister of Economic Affairs Gijs van Aardenne (VVD) served as acting Minister of Finance until 5 March 1980 when Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries Fons van der Stee (KVP) was appointed as Minister of Finance. That same day Member of the House of Representatives Gerrit Braks (KVP) was installed as Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries. On 16 April 1980 Member of the House of Representatives Marius van Amelsvoort (KVP) was appointed as State Secretary for Finance.

On 25 August 1980 Minister of Defence Willem Scholten (CHU) resigned after he was appointed Vice-President of the Council of State. That same day former naval officer Pieter de Geus (CHU), who until then had been working as a top official at the Ministry of Defence was appointed as his successor.

On 1 September 1981 ten days before the new cabinet took office Minister for Housing and Spatial Planning Pieter Beelaerts van Blokland (CDA) resigned after he had been appointed Mayor of Apeldoorn. Minister of Transport and Water Management Dany Tuijnman (VVD) took over the position until the new cabinet was installed on 11 September 1981.

The Members of the First Van Agt cabinet after the installation at Soestdijk Palace on 19 December 1977.
Prime Minister of the Netherlands Antilles Boy Rozendal and Deputy Prime Minister Hans Wiegel at a press conference in The Hague on 26 January 1978.
Minister of Foreign Affairs Chris van der Klaauw, President of the European Commission Roy Jenkins and Prime Minister Dries van Agt at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on 21 March 1978.
State Minister for Economics and Finance of Indonesia Widjojo Nitisastro and Minister for Development Cooperation Jan de Koning at a Inter-Governmental Group on Indonesia meeting in The Hague on 22 May 1978.
President of the Gambia Dawda Jawara and Minister for Development Cooperation Jan de Koning in Amsterdam on 21 November 1978.
Minister for Development Cooperation Jan de Koning, President of Bangladesh Ziaur Rahman and Prime Minister Dries van Agt at the Ministry of General Affairs on 23 April 1979.
Prime Minister Dries van Agt and Secretary General of NATO Joseph Luns at a NATO summit in The Hague on 30 May 1979.
President of Cameroon Ahmadou Ahidjo and Deputy Prime Minister Hans Wiegel at the Catshuis on 5 July 1979.
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Japan Sunao Sonoda and Minister of Foreign Affairs Chris van der Klaauw at Airport Schiphol on 31 July 1979.
Ambassador of the Soviet Union to the Netherlands Vasily Tolstikov and Minister of Foreign Affairs Chris van der Klaauw in The Hague on 23 January 1980.
President of Rwanda Juvénal Habyarimana and Prime Minister Dries van Agt at the Catshuis on 13 May 1980.
Incoming President of the European Commission Gaston Thorn and Prime Minister Dries van Agt at the Catshuis on 22 October 1980.
Minister of Foreign Affairs Chris van der Klaauw, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Margaret Thatcher and Prime Minister Dries van Agt at the Catshuis on 6 February 1981.
Prime Minister of Japan Zenkō Suzuki and Prime Minister Dries van Agt at the Catshuis on 18 June 1981.

Cabinet Members

Ministers Title/Ministry Term of office Party
Dries van Agt Dries van Agt
(born 1931)
Prime Minister General Affairs 19 December 1977 –
4 November 1982
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Hans Wiegel Hans Wiegel
(born 1941)
Deputy Prime Minister /
Minister
Interior 19 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Chris van der Klaauw Dr.
Chris van der Klaauw
(1924–2005)
Minister Foreign Affairs 19 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Frans Andriessen Frans Andriessen
(born 1929)
Minister Finance 19 December 1977 –
22 February 1980
[Res]
Catholic People's Party
Gijs van Aardenne Gijs van Aardenne
(1930–1995)
22 February 1980 –
5 March 1980
[Ad interim]
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Fons van der Stee Fons van der Stee
(1928–1999)
5 March 1980 –
4 November 1982
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Job de Ruiter Dr.
Job de Ruiter
(1930–2015)
Minister Justice 19 December 1977 –
4 November 1982
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Gijs van Aardenne Gijs van Aardenne
(1930–1995)
Minister Economic Affairs 19 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Roelof Kruisinga Dr.
Roelof Kruisinga
(1922–2012)
Minister Defence 19 December 1977 –
4 March 1978
[Res]
Christian Historical Union
Jan de Koning Jan de Koning
(1926–1994)
4 March 1978 –
8 March 1978
[Ad interim]
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Willem Scholten Willem Scholten
(1927–2005)
8 March 1978 –
25 August 1980
[Appt]
Christian Historical Union
Pieter de Geus Pieter de Geus
(1929–2004)
25 August 1980 –
11 September 1981
Christian Historical Union
Christian Democratic Appeal
Leendert Ginjaar Dr.
Leendert Ginjaar
(1928–2003)
Minister Health and
Environment
19 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Wil Albeda Dr.
Wil Albeda
(1925–2014)
Minister Social Affairs 19 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Arie Pais Dr.
Arie Pais
(born 1930)
Minister Education and
Sciences
19 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Dany Tuijnman Dany Tuijnman
(1915–1992)
Minister Transport and
Water Management
19 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Fons van der Stee Fons van der Stee
(1928–1999)
Minister Agriculture and
Fisheries
1 November 1973 –
5 March 1980
[Retained] [Appt]
Catholic People's Party
Gerrit Braks Gerrit Braks
(1933–2017)
5 March 1980 –
11 September 1981
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Pieter Beelaerts van Blokland Jonkheer
Pieter Beelaerts
van Blokland

(born 1932)
Minister Housing and
Spatial Planning
19 December 1977 –
1 September 1981
[Appt]
Christian Historical Union
Christian Democratic Appeal
Dany Tuijnman Dany Tuijnman
(1915–1992)
1 September 1981 –
11 September 1981
[Ad interim]
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Til Gardeniers-Berendsen Til Gardeniers-Berendsen
(born 1925)
Minister Culture, Recreation
and Social Work
19 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Ministers without portfolio Title/Portfolio/Ministry Term of office Party
Jan de Koning Jan de Koning
(1926–1994)
Minister Development Cooperation

(within Foreign Affairs)
19 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Rinus Peijnenburg Rinus Peijnenburg
(1928–1979)
Minister Science Policy

(within Education and
Sciences
)
19 December 1977 –
1 April 1979
[Died]
Catholic People's Party
Leendert Ginjaar Dr.
Leendert Ginjaar
(1928–2003)
1 April 1979 –
3 May 1979
[Ad interim]
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Ton van Trier Dr.
Ton van Trier
(1926–1983)
3 May 1979 –
11 September 1981
Independent
Christian Democrat

(Catholic)
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Fons van der Stee Fons van der Stee
(1928–1999)
Minister Netherlands Antilles Affairs

(within Interior)
19 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
State Secretaries Title/Portfolio/Ministry Term of office Party
Henk Koning Henk Koning
(1933–2016)
State Secretary • Central Government Affairs
• Local Government Affairs
• Government Reform
• Government Real Estate

(within Interior)
28 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Durk van der Mei Durk van der Mei
(1924–2018)
State Secretary • European Affairs
• NATO Affairs
• Benelux Affairs
• International Aviation Policy

(within Foreign Affairs)
28 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
Christian Historical Union
Christian Democratic Appeal
Ad Nooteboom Ad Nooteboom
(born 1928)
State Secretary • Fiscal Affairs
• National Mint
• Gambling Policy
• State Lottery

(within Finance)
28 December 1977 –
22 February 1980
[Res]
Christian Historical Union
Marius van Amelsvoort Marius van Amelsvoort
(1930–2006)
16 April 1980 –
11 September 1981
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Bert Haars Bert Haars
(1913–1997)
State Secretary • Integration
• Immigration
• Asylum Affairs
• Privacy Policy
• Family Law
• Youth Justice
• International Law
• Prison Administration
• Rehabilitation

(within Justice)
28 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
Christian Historical Union
Christian Democratic Appeal
Ted Hazekamp Ted Hazekamp
(1926–1987)
State Secretary • Small Business Policy
• Retail Policy
• Competition Policy
• Regional Development
• Consumer Protection
• Tourism Affairs

(within Economic Affairs)
11 May 1973 –
11 September 1981
[Retained]
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Has Beyen Has Beyen
(1923–2002)
• International Trade
• Export Promotion

(within Economic Affairs)
9 January 1978 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Cees van Lent Cees van Lent
(1922–2000)
State Secretary • Personnel Affairs

(within Defence)
11 March 1974 –
11 September 1981
[Retained]
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Wim van Eekelen Dr.
Wim van Eekelen
(born 1931)
• Equipment Policy
• Military Justice

(within Defence)
20 January 1978 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Els Veder-Smit Els Veder-Smit
(born 1921)
State Secretary • Youth Policy
• Elderly Policy
• Disability Affairs
• Veteran Affairs
• Medical Ethics Policy
• Food Policy

(within Health and
Environment
)
3 January 1978 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Louw de Graaf Louw de Graaf
(born 1930)
State Secretary • Social Security
• Occupational Safety

(within Social Affairs)
28 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Klaas de Jong Klaas de Jong
(1926–2011)
State Secretary • Secondary Education
• Higher Education
• Adult Education

(within Education and
Sciences
)
1 September 1975 –
11 September 1981
[Retained]
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Ad Hermes Ad Hermes
(1929–2002)
• Primary Education
• Teacher Policy

(within Education and
Sciences
)
9 January 1978 –
9 September 1981
[Res]
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Neelie Kroes Neelie Kroes
(born 1941)
State Secretary • Transport Infrastructure
• Aviation Infrastructure
• Water Infrastructure
• Public Transport
• Postal Service
• Weather Forecasting Service

(within Transport and
Water Management
)
28 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Gerrit Brokx Gerrit Brokx
(1933–2002)
State Secretary • Urban Planning
• Public Housing
• Spatial Planning

(within Housing and
Spatial Planning
)
28 December 1977 –
11 September 1981
Catholic People's Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Jeltien Kraaijeveld-Wouters Jeltien Kraaijeveld-Wouters
(born 1932)
State Secretary • Unemployment Affairs
• Poverty Policy
• Equality
• Emancipation

(within Culture, Recreation
and Social Work
)
28 December 1977 –
9 September 1981
[Res]
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Christian Democratic Appeal
Gerard Wallis de Vries Gerard Wallis de Vries
(1936–2018)
• Social Services
• Environmental Policy
• Nature Policy
• Media Affairs
• Culture Policy
• Arts Policy
• Recreation Affairs
• Sport

(within Culture, Recreation
and Social Work
)
4 January 1978 –
11 September 1981
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Source: (in Dutch) Kabinet-Van Agt I Rijksoverheid
Retained Retained this position from the previous cabinet.
Res Resigned.
Ad interim Served ad interim.
Appt Appointment: Willem Scholten appointed Vice President of the Council of State; Fons van der Stee appointed Minister of Finance. Pieter Beelaerts van Blokland appointed Mayor of Apeldoorn.
Died Died in office.

References

  1. ^ (in Dutch) "Partij of Principes - De dissidenten binnen het kabinet Van Agt/Wiegel". Andere Tijden. 23 September 2010. Retrieved 16 February 2018.

External links

Official
  • (in Dutch) Kabinet-Van Agt I Parlement & Politiek
  • (in Dutch) Kabinet-Van Agt I Rijksoverheid
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