Finland national football team

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Finland
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Huuhkajat
(The Eagle-owls)[1]
Association Football Association of Finland
(Suomen Palloliitto)
(Finlands Bollförbund)
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Markku Kanerva
Captain Niklas Moisander
Most caps Jari Litmanen (137)
Top scorer Jari Litmanen (32)
Home stadium Helsinki Olympic Stadium
FIFA code FIN
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 67 Increase 7 (23 November 2017)
Highest 33 (March 2007)
Lowest 110 (July–August 2017)
Elo ranking
Current 66 (15 November 2017)
Highest 30[2] (March 2002)
Lowest 125[2] (1962-3)
First international
Russian Empire Finland 2–5 Sweden 
(Helsinki, Grand Duchy of Finland, Russian Empire; 22 October 1911)
Biggest win
Finland Finland 10–2 Estonia 
(Helsinki, Finland; 11 August 1922)
Finland Finland 8–0 San Marino 
(Helsinki, Finland; 17 November 2010)
Biggest defeat
 Germany 13–0 Finland Finland
(Leipzig, Germany; 1 September 1940)
National team against Denmark in 1933.

The Finland national football team (Finnish: Suomen jalkapallomaajoukkue, Swedish: Finlands fotbollslandslag) represents Finland in international football competitions and is controlled by the Football Association of Finland.

Although the Finnish national team has never qualified for a finals tournament of the World Cup or the European Championships, the Nordic nation made remarkable progression in the 2000s, reaching a peak of 30th on the Elo Rankings, under coach of Roy Hodgson they achieved notable results against much more established European teams. Unfortunately, after a few years of bad performances, they dipped to a FIFA ranking of 110, their lowest in history. However in the autumn of 2017 Finland began to rise up the FIFA rankings and as of December currently sit at 67.

Finland has also participated on two occasions in the European sub-regional Baltic Cup championship, which takes place every two years between the Baltic countries of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Finland's best result in the Baltic Cup tournament was in 2012 when they finished as runners-up. In 2014 Finland finished the tournament in third place.

Early history

The Football Association of Finland was founded in 1907 and became a member of FIFA in 1908. At the time, Finland was an autonomous grand duchy of the Russian Empire. Finland played its first international on 22 October 1911, as Sweden beat the Finns at the Eläintarha Stadium in Helsinki. Finland participated the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, beating Italy and the Russian Empire, but losing the bronze medal match against the Netherlands.

Period of dispersion

After the 1918 Civil War, the Finnish sports movement was divided into the right-wing Finnish Gymnastics and Sports Federation (SVUL) and the leftist Finnish Workers' Sports Federation (TUL), Finnish Football Association was a member of the SVUL.[3] Both sides had their own championship series, and between 1919–1939 the Finland national team was selected of the Football Association players only. The Finnish Workers' Sports Federation football team in turn, participated the competitions of the international labour movement.[4]

However, since the late 1920s several top footballers defected from TUL and joined the Football Association to be eligible for the national team. During the 1930s, these ″defectors″ formed the spine of the national team. For example, the Finland squad at the 1936 Summer Olympics was composed of eight former TUL players.[4] In 1937, Finland participated the FIFA World Cup qualification for the first time, losing all three matches against Sweden, Germany and Estonia.

Since 1939, TUL players were selected to the national team and finally in 1956, the TUL and Football Association series were merged.[4]

Post-war years

The 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki saw the Finnish hosts lose to Austria in the first round. Finland did, however, win the unofficial Nordic championship in 1964 and 1966.[5]

Finland also took part in European Championship qualifying since the 1968 event, but had to wait for its first win until 1978.

Later 20th century

The results of the team improved somewhat in the late 1970s and the 1980s. Finland missed out on qualification for Euro 1980 by just a point and for the 1986 World Cup by two points. Finland was invited to take part in the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow after many Western countries announced they would boycott the games, but failed to progress from its group.

By the mid-1990s Finland started to have more players in high-profile European leagues, led by the Ajax superstar Jari Litmanen. In 1996 Danish Euro 1992 winning coach Richard Møller Nielsen was hired to take Finland to the 1998 World Cup. The team enjoyed mixed fortunes in the campaign, high points of which were a draw and a win away to Norway and Switzerland respectively. Going into the last match, Finland would have needed a win at home to Hungary to earn a place in the play-offs. They led the game 1–0 going into injury time, but scored an own goal, and once again the dreams of qualification were over. Møller Nielsen also tried to lead Finland to Euro 2000. In this campaign the Finns recorded a sensational win away to Turkey, but couldn't compete with Germany and Turkey in the long run.

Antti Muurinen succeeded Møller Nielsen as coach in 2000. He had arguably the most talented group of Finnish players ever at his disposal, including players such as Antti Niemi, Sami Hyypiä, Teemu Tainio and Mikael Forssell in addition to the legendary Litmanen. The team also performed quite well under him in qualification for the 2002 World Cup despite a difficult draw, earning two draws against Germany and a home draw with England as well as beating Greece 5–1 in Helsinki. In the end, however, England and Germany proved too strong, and the Finns finished third in the group, but were the only team in that group not to lose at home. Hopes were high going into qualification for Euro 2004 after the promising last campaign and friendly wins over the likes of Norway, Belgium and Portugal (which seen the Finns jump from 40th–30th in the Elo ranking[2]). However, Finland started the campaign by losing to Wales and Yugoslavia (later Serbia and Montenegro, now two separate nations). These losses were followed by two defeats by Italy, and a 3–0 home win over Serbia and Montenegro was little consolation, as the Finns finished fourth in the group. In qualification for the 2006 World Cup Finland failed to score a single point in six matches against the top three teams in their group, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic and Romania. Muurinen was sacked in June 2005, and he was replaced by caretaker Jyrki Heliskoski, but results didn't improve.

In August 2005, it was announced that Roy Hodgson would become the new Finland coach in 2006, and he started in the job in January of that year. Hodgson stepped down as manager after they failed to qualify for Euro 2008.[6] His replacement was a Scotsman, Stuart Baxter, who signed a contract until the end of the 2012 European Championship qualification campaign.[7]

Recent history

At the time when Finland was competing in Euro 2008 qualifying for a place in the UEFA Euro 2008 tournament, Finland was at the point of their "golden generation", with a team consisting of players such as Jari Litmanen, Sami Hyypiä, Mikael Forssell, Hannu Tihinen, Petri Pasanen, Joonas Kolkka, Mika Väyrynen and Teemu Tainio. With this squad Finland was closer to reach the tournament stage than ever before. Finland would only have needed three more points (one more win) from the Euro 2008 qualifying to reach the Euro 2008 competition. Finland was placed in Group A together with Portugal, Poland, Serbia, Belgium, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan. The team started the campaign very well, beating Poland 3–1 away and earning a 1–1 draw with Portugal at home. The Finns then gained four points from their difficult away ties against Armenia and Kazakhstan, drawing 0–0 with the former and beating the latter 2–0. On 15 November 2006, Finland beat Armenia 1–0 at home, thus remaining undefeated in the qualifying. In Finland's first match of 2007, they were in poor form when they lost against Azerbaijan 1–0. On early June they lost to Serbia 2–0 at home. But the next match was against Belgium and team Finland gained the trust of their fans back by winning 2–0 at home. This was followed by a series of wins including a 2–1 win against Azerbaijan, with the team needing to win the last game, the away game against Portugal, to be able to qualify. However, the match ended 0–0 meaning the team missed out on qualification to the tournament, with Finland ending the group stage with 24 points and Portugal with 27 points. However, the performance in qualifying led to the Finns gaining their best-ever FIFA world ranking to date at the position of 33rd.

In 2010 World cup qualification campaign Finland fared little better, with the team under new head coach Stuart Baxter not winning matches as consistently like they did under Roy Hodgson. However the team were within touching distance of a win over Euro 2008 finalists Germany, but had to settle for a 3–3 draw. The team again finished third in their group with five wins, three draws and two defeats. They were the only team in qualifying not to lose to eventual 3rd-place finishers Germany, but came close to a win in the second meeting only to concede an equaliser in stoppage time.

Qualification for the European 2012 European Championship has so far been underwhelming, with three straight defeats against Moldova (2–0), the Netherlands and Hungary (both 2–1), before closing 2010 with an 8–0 success against minnows San Marino which saw Mikael Forssell the first player of the group to score a hat trick. Before their first win of the campaign, the team slipped to 87th in the FIFA World Rankings, despite still staying in the top 100 and therefore keeping up their consistency in the top half of the monthly table, this was however their lowest-ever position in their history since the rankings were established in 1993. The team then moved up to 76th place after a disappointing 1–0 win over San Marino, that team's best result in their group having lost every game with no goals scored. This was then followed up by a 5–0 mauling by their neighbours Sweden, giving them their fourth defeat in the group.

For the Qualification for the 2014 World Cup, Finland has seen significant improvement despite up and down results. Being ranked the weakest team in the group, they started the qualification with little success with a 1–0 loss to France, and a disappointing 1–1 home draw with Georgia in Helsinki. They then achieved a historic 1–1 draw against number 1 ranked Spain who are reigning European and World Cup champions in Gijon, with Teemu Pukki scoring the equalizing goal in the 79th minute. They followed that up with a 1–0 win over Belarus. These two results propelled Finland right back into the conversation for a potential playoff spot. However they were held to a 1–1 draw at Belarus 4 days later. Next up Finland hosted Spain in Helsinki, hoping to achieve another upset result that would have increased their chances for a playoff spot greatly, however they lost 2–0 with goals coming from Jordi Alba and Álvaro Negredo with Teemu Tainio giving Finland's only real threat to score but his shot was well saved by Iker Casillas. Despite the loss, Finland still had a slight chance to finish second, but they need to win against Georgia in Tbilisi, and France to lose against Belarus in Minsk. Finland achieved their task of defeating Georgia 1–0 thanks to a Roman Eremenko penalty kick. However France ended up coming back to defeat Belarus 4–2, despite trailing 2–0 at halftime. Because of the French victory, Finland were eliminated from a playoff spot. They finished the campaign third in their group after losing 3–0 against France in the final game in Paris.

Stadia

Most of Finland's important home matches are played at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in the capital Helsinki. It has been Finland's principal home stadium ever since its construction was completed in 1938. Before that Pallokenttä in Helsinki was mainly used.

Today, some qualifying matches against lower profile opponents and some friendlies are hosted at the Ratina Stadion in Tampere. Helsinki's Sonera Stadium, which has artificial turf, is also used for some friendlies and qualifiers. During reconstruction of Helsinki Olympic Stadium in 2016–19 Ratina Stadion serves as the main stadium for qualifying games.

Competitive record

All–time record against all nations

This list is Finland national team complete records, both friendlies and competitive matches.[8] As of 24 March 2017

Against Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD % Won
 Albania 7 4 1 2 8 6 +2 057.14
 Algeria 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2 000.00
 Andorra 2 1 1 0 3 0 +3 050.00
 Armenia 4 3 1 0 6 1 +5 075.00
 Austria 10 1 1 8 10 23 −13 010.00
 Azerbaijan 8 7 0 1 15 5 +10 087.50
 Bahrain 5 4 1 0 9 1 +8 080.00
 Barbados 1 0 1 0 0 0 +0 000.00
 Belarus 4 1 3 0 5 4 +1 025.00
 Belgium 11 4 4 3 19 20 −1 036.36
 Bermuda 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100.00
 Bolivia 2 0 1 1 2 5 −3 000.00
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 000.00
 Brazil 3 0 0 3 3 9 −6 000.00
 Bulgaria 8 0 1 7 3 19 −16 000.00
 Canada 1 1 0 0 3 2 +1 100.00
 Chile 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2 000.00
 China PR 4 4 0 0 7 6 +1 100.00
 Colombia 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 000.00
 Costa Rica 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 000.00
 Croatia 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 000.00
 Cyprus 4 2 1 1 7 4 +3 050.00
 Czech Republic 11 3 3 5 14 22 −8 027.27
 Denmark 59 11 10 38 60 151 −91 018.64
 East Germany 7 2 1 4 8 21 −13 028.57
 Ecuador 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 000.00
 Egypt 2 0 0 2 2 4 −2 000.00
 England 13 0 2 11 7 44 −37 000.00
 Estonia 31 14 10 7 71 40 +31 045.16
 Faroe Islands 5 5 0 0 15 1 +14 100.00
 France 8 0 0 8 3 18 −15 000.00
 Georgia 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1 050.00
 Germany 23 1 6 16 19 82 −63 004.35
 Greece 14 4 3 7 18 25 −7 028.57
 Honduras 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100.00
 Hungary 17 3 3 11 15 48 −33 017.65
 Iceland 12 6 2 4 19 14 +5 050.00
 India 2 1 1 0 2 0 +2 050.00
 Indonesia 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 000.00
 Iraq 2 2 0 0 3 0 +3 100.00
 Ireland 5 0 2 3 2 11 −9 000.00
 Israel 5 2 1 2 6 6 +0 040.00
 Italy 13 1 1 11 7 32 −25 007.69
 Japan 2 2 0 0 7 1 +6 100.00
 Kazakhstan 3 2 1 0 4 1 +3 066.67
 Kosovo 1 0 1 0 1 1 +0 000.00
 Kuwait 7 3 2 2 6 5 +1 042.86
 Latvia 17 10 3 4 32 18 +14 058.82
 Liechtenstein 2 1 1 0 3 2 +1 050.00
 Lithuania 5 3 0 2 15 5 +10 060.00
 Luxembourg 5 4 0 1 12 4 +8 080.00
 Macedonia 4 3 0 1 11 2 +9 075.00
 Malaysia 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 000.00
 Malta 7 4 2 1 9 5 +4 057.14
 Mexico 4 0 1 3 2 7 −5 000.00
 Moldova 4 2 1 1 7 5 +2 050.00
 Morocco 2 1 1 0 1 0 +1 050.00
 Netherlands 14 1 2 11 14 43 −29 007.14
 North Korea 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100.00
 Northern Ireland 9 3 2 4 13 12 +1 033.33
 Norway 66 9 16 41 81 181 −100 013.64
 Oman 6 3 3 0 7 2 +5 050.00
 Peru 1 0 0 1 3 7 −4 000.00
 Poland 29 3 8 18 25 67 −42 010.34
 Portugal 10 1 4 5 6 14 −8 010.00
 Qatar 4 1 3 0 4 3 +1 025.00
 Romania 11 0 4 7 5 27 −22 000.00
 Russia 20 1 5 14 13 66 −53 005.00
 San Marino 4 4 0 0 15 0 +15 100.00
 Saudi Arabia 4 2 1 1 7 4 +3 050.00
 Scotland 8 0 2 6 5 18 −13 000.00
 Serbia 9 2 2 5 10 30 −20 022.22
 Slovakia 3 0 1 2 1 4 −3 000.00
 Slovenia 2 1 1 0 3 1 +2 050.00
 South Korea 3 3 0 0 5 0 +5 100.00
 Spain 8 1 2 5 5 16 −11 012.50
 Sweden 88 11 11 66 96 292 −196 012.50
  Switzerland 5 2 0 3 5 7 −2 040.00
 Thailand 5 5 0 0 12 6 +6 100.00
 Trinidad and Tobago 5 3 1 1 8 7 +1 060.00
 Tunisia 3 2 1 0 6 2 +4 066.67
 Turkey 14 6 3 5 20 22 −2 042.86
 United Arab Emirates 1 0 1 0 1 1 +0 000.00
 Ukraine 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 000.00
 United States 2 0 0 2 1 3 −2 000.00
 Uruguay 2 0 0 2 1 8 −7 000.00
 Wales 12 4 4 4 12 17 −5 033.33
 Yemen 1 0 1 0 0 0 +0 000.00

World Cup record

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 Did Not Enter
Italy 1934
France 1938 Did Not Qualify 3 0 0 3 0 7
Brazil 1950 Withdrew during qualifying
Switzerland 1954 Did Not Qualify 4 0 2 2 7 13
Sweden 1958 4 0 0 4 2 19
Chile 1962 4 0 0 4 3 12
England 1966 6 1 0 5 5 20
Mexico 1970 6 1 0 5 6 28
West Germany 1974 6 1 1 4 3 21
Argentina 1978 6 2 0 4 11 16
Spain 1982 8 1 0 7 4 27
Mexico 1986 8 3 2 3 7 12
Italy 1990 6 1 1 4 4 16
United States 1994 10 2 1 7 9 18
France 1998 8 3 2 3 11 12
South KoreaJapan 2002 8 3 3 2 12 7
Germany 2006 12 5 1 6 21 19
South Africa 2010 10 5 3 2 14 14
Brazil 2014 8 2 3 3 5 9
Russia 2018 9 2 3 5 9 13
Qatar 2022 To be determined
Total 0/21 123 30 20 73 128 280

European Championship record

UEFA European Championship record UEFA Euro Championship Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
France 1960 Did Not Enter
Spain 1964
Italy 1968 Did Not Qualify 6 0 2 4 5 12
Belgium 1972 6 0 1 5 1 16
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1976 6 0 1 5 3 13
Italy 1980 6 2 2 2 10 15
France 1984 6 0 1 5 3 14
West Germany 1988 6 1 1 4 4 10
Sweden 1992 8 1 4 3 5 8
England 1996 10 5 0 5 18 18
Belgium Netherlands 2000 8 3 1 4 13 13
Portugal 2004 8 3 1 4 9 10
Austria Switzerland 2008 14 6 6 2 13 7
Poland Ukraine 2012 10 3 1 6 16 16
France 2016 10 3 3 4 9 10
European Union 2020 To be determined
Total 0/15 104 27 24 53 109 162

Summer Olympics

Olympics record
Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
Sweden 1912 Fourth Place 4th 4 2 0 2 5 16
Nazi Germany 1936 Round of 16 14th 1 0 0 1 3 7
Finland 1952 Round of 16 9th 1 0 0 1 3 4
Soviet Union 1980 Group stage 9th 3 1 1 1 3 2
Total 4/23 0 Titles 9 3 1 5 14 29

Nordic Football Championship

Nordic Football Championship record
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA
1929–32 Fourth place 4nd 12 2 2 8 23 52
1933–36 Fourth place 4nd 12 3 1 8 18 36
1937–47 Fourth place 4nd 12 1 1 10 12 51
1948–51 Fourth place 4nd 12 1 3 8 11 28
1952–55 Fourth place 4nd 12 1 1 10 13 53
1956–59 Fourth place 4nd 12 0 1 11 8 44
1960–63 Fourth place 4nd 12 2 2 8 14 37
1964–67 Third place 3st 12 5 2 5 14 17
1968–71 Fourth place 4nd 12 0 4 8 10 31
1972–77 Fourth place 4nd 12 1 4 7 10 26
1978–80 Fourth place 4nd 6 1 4 7 10 26
1981–85 Fourth place 4nd 6 1 1 4 7 11
2000–01 Champions 1st 5 4 0 1 7 3
Total 1 titles 13/14 137 21 24 92 150 401
*Gold background color indicates that the tournament was won.

2018 FIFA World Cup

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Iceland 10 7 1 2 16 7 +9 22 Qualification to 2018 FIFA World Cup 1–0 2–0 2–0 3–2 2–0
2  Croatia 10 6 2 2 15 4 +11 20 Advance to second round 2–0 1–0 1–1 1–1 1–0
3  Ukraine 10 5 2 3 13 9 +4 17 1–1 0–2 2–0 1–0 3–0
4  Turkey 10 4 3 3 14 13 +1 15 0–3 1–0 2–2 2–0 2–0
5  Finland 10 2 3 5 9 13 −4 9 1–0 0–1 1–2 2–2 1–1
6  Kosovo 10 0 1 9 3 24 −21 1 1–2 0–6 0–2 1–4 0–1
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

5 September 2016 (2016-09-05)
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
Finland  1–1  Kosovo
Arajuuri Goal 18' Report (FIFA)
Report (UEFA)
V. Berisha Goal 60' (pen.)
Veritas Stadion, Turku
Attendance: 7,571
Referee: Ivan Kružliak (Slovakia)

6 October 2016 (2016-10-06)
20:45
(18:45 UTC±0)
Iceland  3–2  Finland
Árnason Goal 37'
Finnbogason Goal 90+1'
R. Sigurðsson Goal 90+6'
Report (FIFA)
Report (UEFA)
Pukki Goal 21'
Lod Goal 39'
Laugardalsvöllur, Reykjavík
Attendance: 9,548
Referee: Svein Oddvar Moen (Norway)

9 October 2016 (2016-10-09)
18:00
(19:00 UTC+3)
Finland  0–1  Croatia
Report (FIFA)
Report (UEFA)
Mandžukić Goal 18'
Tampere Stadium, Tampere
Attendance: 15,567
Referee: Ruddy Buquet (France)

12 November 2016 (2016-11-12)
20:45
(21:45 UTC+2)
Ukraine  1–0  Finland
Kravets Goal 25' Report (FIFA)
Report (UEFA)
Chornomorets Stadium, Odessa
Attendance: 26,482
Referee: Jorge Sousa (Portugal)

24 March 2017 (2017-03-24)
18:00
(20:00 UTC+3)
Turkey  2–0  Finland
Tosun Goal 9'13' Report (FIFA)
Report (UEFA)
New Antalya Stadium, Antalya
Attendance: 28,990
Referee: Jesús Gil Manzano (Spain)

11 June 2017 (2017-06-11)
18:00
(19:00 UTC+3)
Finland  1–2  Ukraine
Pohjanpalo Goal 72' Report (FIFA)
Report (UEFA)

2 September 2017 (2017-09-02)
18:00
(19:00 UTC+3)
Finland  1–0  Iceland
Report (FIFA)
Report (UEFA)
Tampere Stadium, Tampere
Attendance: 15,835
Referee: Pavel Královec (Czech Republic)

5 September 2017 (2017-09-05)
20:45
(20:45 UTC+2)
Kosovo  0–1  Finland
Report (FIFA)
Report (UEFA)

6 October 2017 (2017-10-06)
20:45
(20:45 UTC+2)
Croatia  1–1  Finland
Report (FIFA)
Report (UEFA)

9 October 2017 (2017-10-09)
20:45
(21:45 UTC+3)
Finland  v  Turkey
Report (FIFA)
Report (UEFA)

Friendlies

9 January 2017
Morocco  0–1  Finland
J. Ojala Goal 45+1'

13 January 2017
 Slovenia B 2–0  Finland
Kronaveter Goal 12'
Dobrovoljc Goal 48'

28 March 2017
Austria  1–1  Finland
Arnautović Goal 62' Jensen Goal 76'
Tivoli-Neu, Innsbruck
Attendance: 13,700
Referee: Miroslav Zelinka (Czech Republic)

7 June 2017
Finland  1–1  Liechtenstein
M. Hetemaj Goal 18' Hasler Goal 62'
Veritas Stadion, Turku
Attendance: 5,460
Referee: Mohammed Al-Hakim (Sweden)

9 November 2017
Finland  3–0  Estonia

Current squad

The following players have been called up for the friendly match match against Estonia on 9 November 2017.[9][10]
Caps and goals as of 9 November 2017 after the game against Estonia.

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Lukáš Hrádecký (1989-11-24) 24 November 1989 (age 28) 41 0 Germany Eintracht Frankfurt
1GK Jesse Joronen (1993-03-21) 21 March 1993 (age 24) 3 0 Denmark Horsens
1GK Anssi Jaakkola (1987-03-13) 13 March 1987 (age 30) 2 0 England Reading

2DF Niklas Moisander (Captain) (1985-09-29) 29 September 1985 (age 32) 61 2 Germany Werder Bremen
2DF Joona Toivio (1988-03-10) 10 March 1988 (age 29) 42 2 Norway Molde
2DF Markus Halsti (1984-03-19) 19 March 1984 (age 33) 33 0 Denmark Midtjylland
2DF Paulus Arajuuri (1988-06-15) 15 June 1988 (age 29) 26 2 Denmark Brøndby
2DF Juhani Ojala (1989-06-19) 19 June 1989 (age 28) 22 1 Sweden Häcken
2DF Juha Pirinen (1991-10-22) 22 October 1991 (age 26) 6 0 Finland HJK
2DF Albin Granlund (1989-09-01) 1 September 1989 (age 28) 5 0 Finland IFK Mariehamn

3MF Kasper Hämäläinen (1986-08-08) 8 August 1986 (age 31) 60 8 Poland Legia Warsaw
3MF Rasmus Schüller (1991-06-18) 18 June 1991 (age 26) 24 0 Finland HJK
3MF Robin Lod (1993-04-17) 17 April 1993 (age 24) 18 3 Greece Panathinaikos
3MF Thomas Lam (1993-12-18) 18 December 1993 (age 23) 15 0 Netherlands Twente
3MF Fredrik Jensen (1997-09-09) 9 September 1997 (age 20) 5 1 Netherlands Twente
3MF Simon Skrabb (1995-01-19) 19 January 1995 (age 22) 5 0 Sweden IFK Norrköping
3MF Pyry Soiri (1994-09-22) 22 September 1994 (age 23) 3 2 Belarus Shakhtyor Soligorsk
3MF Glen Kamara (1995-10-28) 28 October 1995 (age 22) 1 0 Scotland Dundee

4FW Teemu Pukki (1990-03-29) 29 March 1990 (age 27) 61 10 Denmark Brøndby
4FW Joel Pohjanpalo (1994-09-13) 13 September 1994 (age 23) 28 6 Germany Bayer Leverkusen
4FW Jasse Tuominen (1995-11-12) 12 November 1995 (age 22) 3 0 Belarus BATE Borisov

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for the team in the last twelve months. Only players available for call-up, not retired players.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Walter Viitala (1992-01-09) 9 January 1992 (age 25) 1 0 Denmark Viborg v.  Austria, 28 March 2017
GK Mika Hilander (1983-08-17) 17 August 1983 (age 34) 1 0 Finland Ilves v.  Morocco, 9 January 2017
GK Markus Uusitalo (1997-05-15) 15 May 1997 (age 20) 0 0 Finland HJK v.  Morocco, 9 January 2017

DF Sauli Väisänen (1994-06-05) 5 June 1994 (age 23) 8 0 Italy SPAL v.  Estonia, 9 November 2017
DF Dani Hatakka (1994-03-12) 12 March 1994 (age 23) 0 0 Finland SJK v.  Turkey, 9 October 2017
DF Kari Arkivuo (1983-06-23) 23 June 1983 (age 34) 55 1 Sweden Häcken v.  Kosovo, 5 September 2017
DF Jere Uronen (1994-07-13) 13 July 1994 (age 23) 25 0 Belgium Racing Genk v.  Kosovo, 5 September 2017
DF Valtteri Moren (1991-06-15) 15 June 1991 (age 26) 4 1 Belgium Waasland-Beveren v.  Kosovo, 5 September 2017 INJ
DF Jukka Raitala (1988-09-15) 15 September 1988 (age 29) 39 0 United States Columbus Crew SC v.  Ukraine, 11 June 2017
DF Janne Saksela (1993-03-14) 14 March 1993 (age 24) 7 0 Netherlands Sparta Rotterdam v.  Ukraine, 11 June 2017
DF Mikko Sumusalo (1990-03-12) 12 March 1990 (age 27) 5 1 Germany Rot-Weiß Erfurt v.  Morocco, 9 January 2017
DF Kristian Kojola (1986-09-12) 12 September 1986 (age 31) 0 0 Finland IFK Mariehamn v.  Morocco, 9 January 2017

MF Tim Sparv (1987-02-20) 20 February 1987 (age 30) 57 1 Denmark Midtjylland v.  Turkey, 9 October 2017
MF Përparim Hetemaj (1986-12-12) 12 December 1986 (age 31) 49 4 Italy Chievo v.  Turkey, 9 October 2017
MF Alexander Ring (1991-04-09) 9 April 1991 (age 26) 43 2 United States New York City v.  Kosovo, 5 September 2017
MF Riku Riski (1989-08-16) 16 August 1989 (age 28) 27 4 Norway Odds v.  Ukraine, 11 June 2017
MF Mehmet Hetemaj (1987-12-08) 8 December 1987 (age 30) 6 1 Finland SJK v.  Ukraine, 11 June 2017
MF Moshtagh Yaghoubi (1994-11-08) 8 November 1994 (age 23) 3 0 Finland HJK v.  Ukraine, 11 June 2017
MF Sakari Mattila (1989-07-14) 14 July 1989 (age 28) 13 0 Denmark SønderjyskE v.  Austria, 28 March 2017
MF Petteri Forsell (1990-10-16) 16 October 1990 (age 27) 8 1 Sweden Örebro v.  Austria, 28 March 2017
MF Joni Kauko (1990-07-12) 12 July 1990 (age 27) 8 0 Denmark Randers v.  Morocco, 9 January 2017
MF Matej Hradecky (1995-04-17) 17 April 1995 (age 22) 2 0 Finland SJK v.  Morocco, 9 January 2017
MF Robert Taylor (1994-10-21) 21 October 1994 (age 23) 1 0 Sweden AIK v.  Morocco, 9 January 2017

FW Eero Markkanen (1991-07-03) 3 July 1991 (age 26) 12 0 Germany Dynamo Dresden v.  Turkey, 9 October 2017
FW Tim Väyrynen (1993-03-29) 29 March 1993 (age 24) 7 0 Germany Hansa Rostock v.  Morocco, 9 January 2017
FW Roope Riski (1991-08-16) 16 August 1991 (age 26) 5 1 Austria SKN St. Pölten v.  Morocco, 9 January 2017
FW Akseli Pelvas (1989-02-08) 8 February 1989 (age 28) 4 0 Finland HJK v.  Morocco, 9 January 2017
  • INJ = Withdrew due to an injury.
  • * = Eremenko is suspended from competitive football until December 2018.

Coaching staff

[11][12][13]

Position Name
Head coach Finland Markku Kanerva
Assistant coach Finland Mika Nurmela
Assistant coach Finland Kari Martonen
Goalkeeping coach Finland Antti Niemi

Player records

Most capped players

Rank Name Career Caps Goals
1 Jari Litmanen 1989–2010 137 32
2 Sami Hyypiä 1992–2010 105 5
Jonatan Johansson 1996–2010 105 22
4 Ari Hjelm 1983–1996 100 20
5 Joonas Kolkka 1994–2010 98 11
6 Mikael Forssell 1999–2014 87 29
7 Erkka Petäjä 1983–1994 84 0
8 Arto Tolsa 1964–1981 77 10
9 Hannu Tihinen 1997–2010 76 5
Petri Pasanen 2000–2013 76 1
10 Toni Kuivasto 1997–2009 75 1

Top goalscorers

Rank Name Career Goals Caps
1 Jari Litmanen 1989–2010 32 137
2 Mikael Forssell 1999–2014 29 87
3 Jonatan Johansson 1996–2010 22 105
4 Ari Hjelm 1983–1996 20 100
5 Mika-Matti Paatelainen 1986–2000 18 70
6 Verner Eklöf 1919–1927 17 32
7 Aulis Koponen 1924–1935 16 39
Gunnar Åström 1923–1937 16 44
9 Alexei Eremenko 2003–2013 14 57
10 Jorma Vaihela 1947–1954 13 33
William Kanerva 1922–1938 13 51
Kai Pahlman 1954–1968 13 56
  • Correct as of March 24, 2017
  • Players who are still active and available for selection are in bold

Managers

Last updated: 13 Oct 2015.

  • Sortable table available in Finnish Wikipedia: Finland national football team.
Tenure Nat Coach Record
G W D L Win %
1911–21 None 17 6 2 9 035.29
1922 Finland Jarl Öhman 4 1 0 3 025.00
1923–35 None 77 22 12 43 028.57
1936–37 Germany Ferdinand Fabra 8 1 1 6 012.50
1937–38 None 9 3 0 6 033.33
1939 Hungary Gábor Obitz 6 1 0 5 016.67
1939–43 None 7 0 1 6 000.00
1945 Sweden Axel Mårtensson 2 0 0 2 000.00
1946 Finland Niilo Tammisalo 3 0 0 3 000.00
1947–55 Finland Aatos Lehtonen 51 7 9 35 013.73
1955–58 Germany Kurt Weinreich 23 3 1 19 013.04
1959–61 Finland Aatos Lehtonen 19 3 0 16 015.79
1962–74 Finland Olavi Laaksonen 91 16 21 54 017.58
1975 Finland Martti Kosma 2 0 1 1 000.00
1975–78 Finland Aulis Rytkönen 30 8 4 18 026.67
1979–81 Finland Esko Malm 27 4 6 17 014.81
1982–87 Finland Martti Kuusela 53 9 11 33 016.98
1988–92 Finland Jukka Vakkila 48 7 21 20 014.58
1993–94 Finland Tommy Lindholm 25 5 7 13 020.00
1994–96 Finland Jukka Ikäläinen 21 7 4 10 033.33
1996–99 Denmark Richard Møller Nielsen 34 9 12 13 026.47
2000–05 Finland Antti Muurinen 72 34 12 26 047.22
2005 Finland Jyrki Heliskoski (caretaker) 6 2 2 2 033.33
2006–07 England Roy Hodgson 22 6 11 5 027.27
2008–10 England Stuart Baxter 31 8 6 17 025.81
2010 Finland Olli Huttunen (caretaker) 1 1 0 0 100.00
2011 Finland Markku Kanerva (caretaker) 2 0 1 1 000.00
2011–2015 Finland Mixu Paatelainen 43 17 11 15 039.53
2015 Finland Markku Kanerva (caretaker) 5 3 2 0 060.00
2016 Sweden Hans Backe 11 0 2 9 000.00
2016– Finland Markku Kanerva 0 0 0 0 !
Total 749 182 160 407 024.30

Kit supplier

Finland's kit are currently supplied by American brand Nike, Inc. They replaced German company Adidas who supplied Finland's kits between 1979 and 2014.

See also

References

  1. ^ Palkittu Bubi käväisi yllättäen palkitsemistilaisuudessa HS.fi – Kaupunki
  2. ^ a b c "World Football Elo Ratings: Finland". World Football Elo Ratings. Retrieved 2011-09-22. 
  3. ^ Andersen, Svein S.; Ronglan, Lars Tore (2012). Nordic Elite Sports: Same Ambitions - Different Tracks. Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School Press. pp. 85–88. ISBN 978-876-30024-5-5. 
  4. ^ a b c Syrjäläinen, Antti (2008). Miksi siksi loikkariksi? Huippu-urheilijoiden loikkaukset TUL:sta SVUL:oon 1919–1939. Joensuu: University of Joensuu. pp. 45–47. ISBN 978-952-21913-7-3. 
  5. ^ rsssf Nordic championship 1964–66.
  6. ^ Hodgson to return for Inter role BBC Sport, 1 December 2007
  7. ^ Suomen Palloliitto – Etusivu Archived 2011-05-25 at the Wayback Machine. (in Finnish)
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-06-29. Retrieved 2015-08-16. 
  9. ^ Huuhkajat nimetty Viro-otteluun
  10. ^ Halsti Väisäsen tilalle Huuhkajiin
  11. ^ Markku Kanerva A-maajoukkueen päävalmentajaksi
  12. ^ Kari Martonen Huuhkajien valmennusryhmään
  13. ^ Huuhkajat Islantia ja Kosovoa vastaan

External links

  • Official website (in Finnish)
  • RSSSF archive of results 1911–
  • RSSSF archive of most capped players and highest goalscorers
  • RSSSF archive of coaches
  • The Finnish National Team Supporters' Association
  • Reports for all official matches
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