February 1935

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The following events occurred in February 1935:

February 1, 1935 (Friday)

  • French and British representatives met in London to discuss Germany's plans to rearm.[1]
  • The Hagia Sophia in Istanbul was reopened as a museum.[2]
  • The BBC said it would begin the world's first public television service by the end of the year.[3]

February 2, 1935 (Saturday)

February 3, 1935 (Sunday)

  • Britain and France announced a proposal to legalize German armaments as well as an air agreement to come to the other's aid if either country was "the victim of unprovoked aerial aggression."[5]

February 4, 1935 (Monday)

February 5, 1935 (Tuesday)

February 6, 1935 (Wednesday)

February 7, 1935 (Thursday)

February 8, 1935 (Friday)

February 9, 1935 (Saturday)

February 10, 1935 (Sunday)

  • John Fisher and Thomas More were recognized as martyrs by Pope Pius XI, a precursor to their canonization.[16]
  • During religious services in Munich, Cardinal Michael von Faulhaber protested the Nazis' recent action of confiscating letters from church dignitaries to Catholic parents. The letters were written in regard to the pressure from the government to withdraw children from Catholic schools and send them to Nazi-controlled public schools instead. "It is useless for the government to violate the freedom of the church and intercept its mail", Faulhaber said. "The Apostle Paul was placed in chains, but his letters went around the world. Whoever passes laws and ordinances against the Catholic Church is liable to excommunication."[17]
  • Gracie Fields signed a record £150,000 contract to make three films.[3]

February 11, 1935 (Monday)

February 12, 1935 (Tuesday)

February 13, 1935 (Wednesday)

February 14, 1935 (Thursday)

  • France ordered troops to French Somaliland to guard against any border incidents during the Abyssinia Crisis.[22]
  • Germany sent its reply to the Anglo-French proposal regarding German armaments. In the note Germany welcomed the prospect of talks but said little else specific.[23]
  • Born: Rob McConnell, jazz musician, in London, Ontario, Canada (d. 2010)

February 15, 1935 (Friday)

  • A House committee on un-American activities led by John William McCormack recommended that legislation be enacted to protect the United States from foreign propaganda. Proposed measures included requiring all publicity agents of foreign organizations to register with the Secretary of State and that treaties be negotiated with other nations to facilitate the deportation of undesirable aliens.[24]

February 16, 1935 (Saturday)

February 17, 1935 (Sunday)

February 18, 1935 (Monday)

February 19, 1935 (Tuesday)

February 20, 1935 (Wednesday)

February 21, 1935 (Thursday)

February 22, 1935 (Friday)

February 23, 1935 (Saturday)

February 24, 1935 (Sunday)

  • Swiss voters approved a referendum on a federal law reorganizing the military.
  • Adolf Hitler marked the 15th anniversary of the founding of the Nazi Party with a speech in Munich, serving notice to the world that Germany would not sign any document that would surrender the country's honor and equality among nations. "Conversely, the world can also rest assured that, when we do sign something, we adhere to it", Hitler stated. "Whatever we believe we cannot adhere to, on principles of honor or ability, we never sign. Whatever we have once signed we will blindly and faithfully fulfill!"[34][35]
  • The Heinkel He 111 had its first flight.

February 25, 1935 (Monday)

  • German Interior Minister Wilhelm Frick decreed that April 20, Hitler's birthday, would henceforth be an important national holiday. As the Kaiser's birthday was in the days of imperial Germany, it would be a day on which titles, promotions and other special honors were to be bestowed.[36]
  • Jack Hobbs announced his retirement from cricket.[3]
  • Died: Gerhard Louis De Geer, 80, 17th Prime Minister of Sweden

February 26, 1935 (Tuesday)

February 27, 1935 (Wednesday)

February 28, 1935 (Thursday)

References

  1. ^ "Chronology 1935". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  2. ^ "History". Hagia Sophia Museum. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. pp. 448–449. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  4. ^ "Supreme Court Ousts Governor of North Dakota". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 3, 1935. p. 3. 
  5. ^ "Britain, France Set Up Military Air Alliance". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 4, 1935. p. 5. 
  6. ^ "3 Nations to Lift Ban on Arms for Bolivia". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 5, 1935. p. 2. 
  7. ^ "Paris Mobilizes 34,000 to Stave off Riot Day War". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 6, 1935. p. 4. 
  8. ^ "Paris Police Crush Holiday Rioters". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 6, 1935. pp. 1–2. 
  9. ^ "French Deport Aliens in Riots". Brooklyn Daily Eagle: 1. February 7, 1935. 
  10. ^ Planes, Alex (February 6, 2013). "The One Monopoly America Will Never Break Up". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Avalanches Hit Central Europe; Fourteen Killed". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 7, 1935. p. 2. 
  12. ^ "Convict Meisner for Kidnaping John S. Labatt". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 7, 1935. p. 3. 
  13. ^ "Russia Elects Stalin as One of Official Rulers". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 8, 1935. p. 5. 
  14. ^ Duka, Cecilio D. (2008). Struggle for Freedom: A Textbook on Philippine History. Rex Publishing. p. 232. ISBN 978-971-23-5045-0. 
  15. ^ "Tageseinträge für 9. Februar 1935". chroniknet. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  16. ^ Darrah, David (February 11, 1935). "Vatican Honors Men Beheaded by Henry VIII". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5. 
  17. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 11, 1935). "Catholics Again Accuse Nazis of Violating Pact". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 9. 
  18. ^ "Italy Orders Army of 250,000 to Africa". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 11, 1935. p. 1. 
  19. ^ "Macon Wrecked By Collapse of Two Gas Cells". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 13, 1935. pp. 1–2. 
  20. ^ "Macon Crash Third Disaster Of Kind in U.S. Navy History". Brooklyn Daily Eagle: 2. February 13, 1935. 
  21. ^ Edwards, Willard (February 14, 1935). "Bruno Sentenced to Death". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  22. ^ "French Troops Rush to Border in Ethiopia Row". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 14, 1935. p. 3. 
  23. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 16, 1935). "Germany Ready to Use Air Force to Prevent War". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2. 
  24. ^ "Fascist Conspiracy for Dictator in U. S. is Proved by Probe". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 15, 1935. p. 1. 
  25. ^ "Beg Hitler Save Girl Spies". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 17, 1935. p. 1. 
  26. ^ "Prepare for War in Africa! Italy Told by Il Duce". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 17, 1935. p. 3. 
  27. ^ "Roosevelt's Gold Policies Upheld; Billions Affected; Market Booms". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 18, 1935. p. 1. 
  28. ^ "Tageseinträge für 18. Februar 1935". chroniknet. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  29. ^ "Ethiopia Warned Italy Ready for Stronger Action". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 20, 1935. p. 13. 
  30. ^ Mosher, Clinton L. (February 20, 1935). "Extend NRA 2 Years, Roosevelt Asks". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. p. 1. 
  31. ^ Glatzer, Nahum Norbert (1996). The Letters of Martin Buber: A Life of Dialogue. Syracuse University Press. p. 430. ISBN 978-0-8156-0420-4. 
  32. ^ Darrah, David (February 23, 1935). "Duce Picks Noted General to Lead Africa Campaign". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5. 
  33. ^ "Paraguay Quits League". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 24, 1935. p. 2. 
  34. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 25, 1935). "German Pledges to be Inviolate, Hitler Declares". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2. 
  35. ^ "The Essential Hitler: Speeches and Commentary". Librarun. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  36. ^ "Decrees Hitler's Birthday as Chief German Holiday". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 26, 1935. p. 2. 
  37. ^ a b c "1935". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  38. ^ "Braves Sign Ruth as Assistant Manager". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 27, 1935. p. 19. 
  39. ^ "Herr Egon Kisch Agreement with Government – Must Leave at Once". The Sydney Morning Herald: 18. February 27, 1935. 
  40. ^ "New Deal Loses Weirton Steel Injunction Suit". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 28, 1935. p. 1. 
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