FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup

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FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup
Founded 1995; 23 years ago (1995)
(rebranded in 2005)
Region International (FIFA)
Number of teams 16 (finals)
83 (2017 qualification)
Current champions  Brazil
(5th title, 14th overall)
Most successful team(s)  Brazil
(5 titles, 14 overall)
Website FIFA
2019 FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup

The FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup is an international beach soccer competition contested by the men's national teams of the member associations of FIFA, the sport's global governing body.

The tournament was established in 1995 as the Beach Soccer World Championship, taking place every year for the next decade under the supervision of Beach Soccer Worldwide (BSWW) and its predecessors. Due to the sport's rapid growth, FIFA took an interest in the sport, and as the main tournament in world beach soccer, it joined hands with BSWW in 2005 to take over the organization of the competition, re-branding it as an official FIFA tournament. Since 2009, the tournament has taken place every two years to allow continental tournaments to flourish without the burden of the World Cup qualifiers crowding the schedule every 12 months. The growing global popularity of beach soccer resulted in FIFA's decision to move the stage of the World Cup from its native home in Brazil to other parts of the globe to capitalise on and continue to stimulate global interest. The first edition held outside Brazil was in 2008 in Marseille, France.

The current tournament format lasts over approximately 10 days and involves 16 teams initially competing in four groups of four teams. The group winners and runners-up advance to a series of knock-out stages until the champion is crowned. The losing semi-finalists play each other in a play-off match to determine the third and fourth-placed teams.

The most recent edition was held in Nassau, Bahamas, and crowned Brazil as champions for the fourteenth time – fifth under the patronage of FIFA – after defeating Tahiti 6–0 in the final.

History

Foundation

The first Beach Soccer World Cup was held in Brazil, in 1995, organised by the precursors to the modern-day founders of the standardised rules, Beach Soccer Worldwide, held under the title Beach Soccer World Championship. Eight teams were selected to take part, without going through a qualification process. However Brazil, the hosts, dominated and easily won the cup without losing a game. The tournament was successful and BSWW announced that the competition would take place every year.

Growth worldwide

By 1997, more teams had already stated their interest in participating and therefore BSWW extended their selection to 10 teams for 1998. Brazil continued to dominate, despite this change. Immediately, BSWW extended to 12 teams for 1999, spreading their selection across five continents, introducing more new teams to the tournament. However, with all these changes it still took until the 2001 World Cup for Brazil to lose the title after winning the competition six years on the run since the establishment. It was Portugal who won the tournament, with Brazil finishing in a disappointing fourth place.

Brazil national beach soccer team: 13 times winners

With this change of champions, more countries thought there was a chance for themselves to win the tournament and this sparked more interest worldwide. Not surprisingly, Brazil reclaimed their title in 2002, when BSWW reduced the number of contestants back to eight. The last Beach Soccer World Championship to be organised purely by BSWW was in 2004 when twelve teams played, seven from Europe.

FIFA Era

In 2005, FIFA paired up with BSWW to co-organise the World Cup, although FIFA seem to have the most control. They kept the tradition of holding the World Cup in Rio de Janeiro and continued to allow 12 teams to participate, following on from the 2004 competition. It was Eric Cantona's France that won the competition, after beating Portugal on penalties in the final. The tournament was deemed a major success and therefore FIFA took advantage. For the 2006 competition and beyond, FIFA decided to standardise the participants to 16 countries. It was then that the FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Qualifiers were also established, that would take place throughout the year. Again this decision was a successful one and more countries became interested in a now standard FIFA competition.

A scene from the 2007 event in Brazil

Extending the World Cup

By the end of the 2007 World Cup, the tournament had become very popular throughout the world, with the FIFA board taking over the competition, driving more countries to recognize beach soccer as a major sport. Since the World Cup had become a success worldwide, FIFA decided to have a change of venue. It was voted, to extend the sport's popularity, the 2008 World Cup would take place in Marseille, France, and the 2009 World Cup would take place in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. These tournaments would be the first to take place outside Brazil. The 2008 competition was once again a major success, despite being held in a different country. This was the first time that Brazil would have to qualify for the tournament, since they weren't the hosts. However Brazil won the qualifiers and the World Cup in July. The 2009 World Cup in Dubai was an even bigger success, as the second competition outside Brazil and the Beach Soccer World Cup's 15th birthday, Brazil continued their dominance.[citation needed]

Two year basis

Just before the final of the 2009 World Cup, FIFA announced that a new format would see the World Cup now take place every two years, starting from the 2011 World Cup. FIFA justified the decision by stating that they wanted Confederations to have more time to develop the sport, therefore allowing a year in between World Cups for Confederations to organise their own local tournaments. This was a mutual decision between Confederations and FIFA.[1] In March 2010 FIFA confirmed that the 2011 World Cup would take place in Italy and the 2013 World Cup would take place in Tahiti.[2]

Qualification

Pre-2006

From 1995 until 2005 there was no standard qualification system for nations to go through to earn a place at the World Cup finals. The process in which teams gained entry into the finals was inconsistent from one year to the next throughout the confederations, often down to a simple invite to participate in the finals from BSWW, or potentially qualification by reaching the latter stages in a premier regional tournament with no prior ties with the World Cup, or perhaps by performing well in the previous World Cup.

During this period, nations from Africa, Asia and sometimes North America were the usual recipients of invitations, due to a lack of regional tournaments for BSWW to determine who was best in said region and worthy to play in the finals. Typically, European nations qualified by doing well in the Euro Beach Soccer League and South American nations in the Americas' League, sometimes jointly with North American nations who also qualified along with them in such circumstances. It was still common for other 'wild-card' European and South American nations to receive invites despite not performing well continentally. However, during the early years of the championships, invitation was the common form of eligibility for all nations.

2006 onwards

Following the success of the inaugural FIFA tournament in 2005, the number of teams at the finals was increased by FIFA to a record 16 and so the governing body along with BSWW met with individual confederations to set up a standard qualifying process for each world cup, by establishing regional championships for each continent. The winners of these championships would be crowned the best team in the region, promoting regional competitiveness, and most importantly act as a consistent method of qualification to the World Cup for the best teams of each confederation. This would also help increase the sport's awareness across all corners of the globe and make sure all confederations were represented at the finals at every following World Cup, unlike in the past.

Besides Europe, who continued to use the Euro Beach Soccer League as the method of World Cup qualification until 2008, all other confederations hosted their first championships in 2006 in view of the finals later that year.

Attendance

The allocation of World Cup spots and hence how many teams qualify from their regional championship to the World Cup was decided by FIFA in 2006 as follows:

Confederation Continent Qualifying tournament Amount of qualifying nations Participating teams in qualification rounds
2006 2007 2008 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 2019
UEFA Europe FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup qualification (UEFA) 5 teams 171 221 24 26 27 24 24 28
CONMEBOL South America FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup qualification (CONMEBOL) 3 teams 6 3 7 8 9 9 10 10
AFC Asia AFC Beach Soccer Championship 3 teams 6 6 6 7 11 16 15 14
CAF Africa Africa Beach Soccer Cup of Nations 2 teams 6 8 8 9 9 8 20 15 13
CONCACAF North, Central America and the Caribbean CONCACAF Beach Soccer Championship 2 teams 5 4 4 6 8 10 16 16
OFC Oceania OFC Beach Soccer Championship 1 team 4 4 4 3 3
Total 16 teams 44 47 49 50 67 70 85 83

^ As part of the Euro Beach Soccer League

The host country's confederation loses one qualification spot. I.e. since the 2015 World Cup was held in Portugal, they automatically qualified taking up one of the five European spots. Therefore, in the 2015 UEFA qualifiers, only four teams qualified from the championships to join the hosts making the total of five European nations.

As shown in the table, attendance of nations in qualification tournaments generally continues to rise year on year; the total global number of participants has nearly doubled since 2006.

Despite being the premier tournament in most regions, since the primary objective is to qualify to the World Cup, on a rare occasion teams have not participated due to qualifying to the finals automatically as hosts such as Brazil deferring from the 2007 CONMBEBOL Beach Soccer Championship and Tahiti in the 2013 OFC Beach Soccer Championship.

Results

Beach Soccer World Championship

# Year Location(s) Champions Runners-up Third place Fourth place No. of
teams
Best player Top goalscorer(s) Best
goalkeeper
Goals
(match avg.)
1 1995
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

United States

England

Italy
8 Zico (BRA)
Júnior (BRA)
Zico (BRA)
Altobelli (ITA)
12 goals Paulo Sérgio
(BRA)
149 (9.3)
2 1996
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Uruguay

Italy

United States
8 Edinho
(BRA)
Altobelli (ITA) 14 goals Paulo Sérgio
(BRA)
131 (8.2)
3 1997
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Uruguay

United States

Argentina
8 Júnior
(BRA)
Júnior (BRA)
Ramos (URU)
11 goals Paulo Sérgio
(BRA)
144 (9.0)
4 1998
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

France

Uruguay

Peru
10 Júnior
(BRA)
Júnior (BRA) 14 goals Paulo Sérgio
(BRA)
218 (9.1)
5 1999
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Portugal

Uruguay

Peru
12 Jorginho
(BRA)
Júnior (BRA)
Matosas (URU)
10 goals Pedro Crespo
(POR)
174 (8.7)
6 2000
Details
Brazil Marina da Glória, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Peru

Spain

Japan
12 Júnior
(BRA)
Júnior (BRA) 13 goals Eichi Kato
(JPN)
172 (8.6)
7 2001
Details
Brazil Costa do Sauípe, Bahia, Brazil
Portugal

France

Argentina

Brazil
12 Hernâni
(POR)
Alan (POR) 10 goals Pascal Olmeta
(FRA)
144 (7.2)
8 2002
Details
Brazil Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brazil
Brazil Guarujá, São Paulo, Brazil

Brazil

Portugal

Uruguay

Thailand
8 Neném
(BRA)
Neném (BRA)
Madjer (POR)
Nico (URU)
9 goals Vilarb Nomcharoen
(THA)
145 (9.1)
9 2003
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Spain

Portugal

France
8 Amarelle
(ESP)
Neném (BRA) 15 goals Robertinho
(BRA)
150 (9.4)
10 2004
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Spain

Portugal

Italy
12 Jorginho
(BRA)
Madjer (POR) 12 goals Roberto Valeiro
(ESP)
155 (7.8)

FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup

# Year Location(s) Champions Runners-up Third place Fourth place No. of
teams
Best player Top goalscorer(s) Best
goalkeeper
Goals
(match avg.)
11 (1) 2005
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
France

Portugal

Brazil

Japan
12 Madjer
(POR)
Madjer (POR) 12 goals Not awarded 164 (8.2)
12 (2) 2006
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Uruguay

France

Portugal
16 Madjer
(POR)
Madjer (POR) 21 goals Not awarded 286 (8.9)
13 (3) 2007
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Mexico

Uruguay

France
16 Buru
(BRA)
Buru (BRA) 10 goals Not awarded 261 (8.2)
14 (4) 2008
Details
France Plages du Prado, Marseille, France
Brazil

Italy

Portugal

Spain
16 Amarelle
(ESP)
Madjer (POR) 13 goals Roberto Valeiro
(ESP)
258 (8.3)
15 (5) 2009
Details
United Arab Emirates Jumeirah Beach, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Brazil

Switzerland

Portugal

Uruguay
16 Dejan Stankovic
(SUI)
Dejan Stankovic (SUI) 16 goals Mão
(BRA)
269 (8.7)
16 (6) 2011
Details
Italy Marina di Ravenna, Ravenna, Italy
Russia

Brazil

Portugal

El Salvador
16 Ilya Leonov
(RUS)
André (BRA) 14 goals Andrey Bukhlitskiy (RUS) 269 (8.4)
17 (7) 2013
Details
French Polynesia Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia
Russia

Spain

Brazil

Tahiti
16 Bruno Xavier
(BRA)
Dmitry Shishin (RUS) 11 goals Dona
(ESP)
243 (7.6)
18 (8) 2015
Details
Portugal Praia da Baía, Espinho, Portugal
Portugal

Tahiti

Russia

Italy
16 Heimanu Taiarui
(TAH)
Pedro Moran (PAR)
Madjer (POR)
Noel Ott (SUI)
8 goals Jonathan Torohia
(TAH)
257 (8.0)
19 (9) 2017
Details
The Bahamas Malcolm Park, Nassau, The Bahamas
Brazil

Tahiti

Iran

Italy
16 Mohammad Ahmadzadeh (IRN) Gabriele Gori
(ITA)
17 goals Peyman Hosseini
(IRN)
266 (8.3)
20 (10) 2019
Details
Paraguay TBA, Paraguay

Note: In the # column, the number in parentheses is the FIFA edition; number outside parentheses is the overall edition.

Results by team

Brazil are by far the most successful nation, with 14 titles. However their hold on the title has become less apparent since the tournament came under the control of FIFA and moved outside of Rio. They are followed by Russia (2011 and 2013) and Portugal (2001 and 2015) with two wins, and France with one title (2005). France won the first FIFA-sanctioned tournament in 2005. Brazil and Portugal are the only teams to win the world championship before and after FIFA started sanctioning the sport.

Overall 18 of the 45 nations who have ever competed have made a top four finish. Brazil remained the only nation to finish in the final four every championship until 2015 when they finished in fifth place. Of those 18 nations, only 7 have made a top four finish before and after FIFA started sanctioning the World Cup.

Nation Titles Runners-up Third place Fourth place
 Brazil 14 (1995*, 1996*, 1997*, 1998*, 1999*, 2000*, 2002*, 2003*, 2004*, 2006*, 2007*, 2008, 2009, 2017) 1 (2011) 2 (2005*, 2013) 1 (2001*)
 Portugal 2 (2001, 2015*) 3 (1999, 2002, 2005) 5 (2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2011) 1 (2006)
 Russia 2 (2011, 2013) 1 (2015)
 France 1 (2005) 2 (1998, 2001) 1 (2006) 2 (2003, 2007)
 Uruguay 3 (1996, 1997, 2006) 4 (1998, 1999, 2002, 2007) 1 (2009)
 Spain 3 (2003, 2004, 2013) 1 (2000) 1 (2008)
 Tahiti 2 (2015, 2017) 1 (2013*)
 Italy 1 (2008) 1 (1996) 4 (1995, 2004, 2015, 2017)
 United States 1 (1995) 1 (1997) 1 (1996)
 Peru 1 (2000) 2 (1998, 1999)
  Switzerland 1 (2009)
 Mexico 1 (2007)
 Argentina 1 (2001) 1 (1997)
 England 1 (1995)
 Iran 1 (2017)
 Japan 2 (2000, 2005)
 El Salvador 1 (2011)
 Thailand 1 (2002)
Key
Bold Years = FIFA tournaments
* = Hosts

Results by confederation

Total times teams played by confederation
AFC CAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL OFC UEFA Total
Teams 32 18 29 63 10 86 238
Top 8 14 5 15 49 3 66 152
Top 4 4 0 5 31 3 33 76
Top 2 0 0 2 19 2 15 38
1st 0 0 0 14 0 5 19
2nd 0 0 2 5 2 10 19
3rd 1 0 1 7 0 10 19
4th 3 0 2 5 1 8 19

Tournament appearances

Since the tournament's establishment in 1995, as of the 2015 World Cup, 45 countries have participated over the 19 competitions. However, only one country has participated in all World Cups, which is Brazil. European teams have dominated in appearances by continent, since 14 of the 45 countries have been from Europe, at least double than that of any other.

Before qualification began, many of the same nations were invited back year on year. This meant that once qualification was introduced in 2006, giving all nations in that confederation a chance to earn a berth at the finals, there was an initial influx of new nations making their debut, including African teams whose continent had only been represented by one nation before and Oceanian countries who had never had their continent been represented previously.

Only 8 of the 45 countries have failed to appear in a FIFA controlled World Cup. Peru (5) have appeared in the most competitions without any one of those being under FIFA's control. Meanwhile, Iran (7) have appeared in the most FIFA sanctioned tournaments without having ever appeared in the old World Championships before 2005.

All-time tables

As of 2017

Key
Appearances Apps / Win in Normal Time W = 3 Points / Win in Extra Time W+ = 2 Points / Win in Penalty shoot-out WP = 1 Point / Loss L = 0 Points
Notes
  • Default position of teams goes by the total points column (Pts)
  • FIFA issued changes to the rules of beach soccer in July 2014 meaning teams now earn 1 point for a penalty shootout win;[3] teams were awarded 2 points for a shootout win prior to July 2014. For the purpose of this table, the calculation of points earned goes by the current rules meaning that penalty shootout wins that occurred both after and before the 2014 rule change have been counted as just 1 point in the "Pts" column.

Overall table (1995 to present)

This table shows the overall statistics of all 19 World Cups that have occurred since 1995, combining the results of both the original Beach Soccer World Championships era and the current FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup era.

Pos Team Apps Pld W W+ WP L GF GA Dif Pts Av. Pts
1  Brazil 19 101 92 0 3 6 748 274 +474 279 2.76
2  Portugal 16 78 48 4 3 23 418 266 +152 155 1.99
3  Spain 14 56 29 1 0 26 219 205 +14 89 1.59
4  Uruguay 15 63 26 3 4 30 256 249 +7 88 1.4
5  France 12 50 23 0 4 23 212 221 –9 73 1.46
6  Argentina 16 57 23 0 1 33 167 211 –44 70 1.23
7  Italy 17 62 22 1 4 35 240 282 –42 68 1.1
8  Russia 7 32 20 2 0 10 146 97 +49 64 2
9  United States 13 44 18 0 0 26 148 198 –50 54 1.23
10  Japan 13 44 11 1 2 30 148 221 –73 37 0.84
11  Tahiti 4 21 10 1 2 8 84 84 0 34 1.62
12  Peru 5 21 11 0 0 9 81 78 +3 33 1.57
13   Switzerland 5 20 10 0 1 9 93 94 –1 31 1.55
14  Senegal 6 21 8 1 2 10 107 86 +21 28 1.33
15  Iran 7 26 6 1 1 18 95 115 –20 21 0.81
16  Nigeria 5 17 5 1 2 9 80 91 –11 19 1.12
17  Mexico 5 19 5 0 2 12 50 77 –27 17 0.89
18  El Salvador 4 16 4 1 0 11 49 81 –32 14 0.88
19  Paraguay 3 10 4 0 0 6 44 43 +1 12 1.2
20  Solomon Islands 5 15 4 0 0 11 55 105 –50 12 0.8
21  United Arab Emirates 5 15 3 0 1 11 51 62 –11 10 0.67
22  Canada 3 10 3 0 1 6 34 63 –29 10 1
23  Ukraine 3 9 3 0 0 6 32 28 +4 9 1
24  England 1 5 2 0 0 3 20 31 –11 6 1.2
25  Bahrain 2 7 1 0 1 5 21 38 –17 4 0.57
26  Thailand 2 7 1 0 1 5 16 34 –18 4 0.57
27  Poland 2 6 1 0 0 5 24 42 –18 3 0.5
28  Denmark 1 3 1 0 0 2 10 16 –6 3 1
29  Bahamas 1 3 1 0 0 2 7 14 –7 3 1
30  Oman 2 6 1 0 0 5 18 26 –8 3 0.5
31  Chile 1 4 1 0 0 3 14 22 –8 3 0.75
32  Ivory Coast 2 6 1 0 0 5 26 37 –11 3 0.5
33  Venezuela 3 8 1 0 0 7 22 33 –11 3 0.38
34  Germany 4 9 1 0 0 8 22 56 –34 3 0.33
35  Cameroon 2 6 0 0 1 5 12 35 –23 1 0.17
36  Netherlands 2 6 0 0 1 5 13 42 –29 1 0.17
37  Turkey 1 2 0 0 0 2 1 5 –4 0 0
38  Madagascar 1 3 0 0 0 3 7 12 –5 0 0
39  Australia 1 2 0 0 0 2 2 8 –6 0 0
40  Malaysia 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 13 –9 0 0
41  Panama 1 3 0 0 0 3 4 14 –10 0 0
42  Belgium 1 2 0 0 0 2 5 18 –13 0 0
43  Ecuador 1 3 0 0 0 3 6 22 –16 0 0
44  Costa Rica 2 6 0 0 0 6 8 31 –23 0 0
45  South Africa 2 4 0 0 0 4 6 29 –23 0 0

FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup era (2005 onward)

This table shows the overall statistics of all 9 World Cups that have occurred since 2005, of the current FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup era only.

Pos Team Apps Pld W W+ WP L GF GA Dif Pts Av. Pts
1  Brazil 9 51 44 0 3 4 326 151 +175 135 2.65
2  Portugal 8 43 25 3 3 12 241 147 +94 84 1.95
3  Russia 6 29 19 2 0 8 139 87 +52 61 2.1
4  Spain 7 29 15 0 0 14 110 97 +13 45 1.55
5  Argentina 8 27 13 0 1 13 85 89 –4 40 1.48
6  France 4 21 12 0 3 6 97 67 +30 39 1.86
7  Uruguay 5 24 10 2 1 11 101 94 +7 35 1.46
8  Tahiti 4 21 10 1 2 8 84 84 0 34 1.62
9  Italy 7 26 10 1 3 12 112 99 +13 31 1.19
10  Senegal 6 21 8 1 2 10 107 86 +21 28 1.33
11   Switzerland 4 17 9 0 1 7 84 77 +7 28 1.65
12  Japan 9 30 8 1 1 20 108 143 –35 27 0.9
13  Iran 7 26 6 1 1 18 95 115 –20 21 0.81
14  Nigeria 5 17 5 1 2 9 80 91 –11 19 1.12
15  Mexico 5 19 5 0 2 12 50 77 –27 17 0.89
16  El Salvador 4 16 4 1 0 11 49 81 –32 14 0.88
17  Paraguay 3 10 4 0 0 6 44 43 +1 12 1.2
18  Solomon Islands 5 15 4 0 0 11 55 105 –50 12 0.8
19  United Arab Emirates 5 15 3 0 1 11 51 62 –11 10 0.67
20  Ukraine 3 9 3 0 0 6 32 28 +4 9 1
21  United States 4 11 3 0 0 8 36 60 –24 9 0.82
22  Canada 1 4 1 0 1 2 12 26 –14 4 1
23  Bahrain 2 7 1 0 1 5 21 38 –17 4 0.57
24  Bahamas 1 3 1 0 0 2 7 14 –7 3 1
25  Oman 2 6 1 0 0 5 18 26 –8 3 0.5
26  Ivory Coast 2 6 1 0 0 5 26 37 –11 3 0.5
27  Poland 2 6 1 0 0 5 24 42 –18 3 0.5
28  Netherlands 1 3 0 0 1 2 6 12 –6 1 0.33
29  Cameroon 2 6 0 0 1 5 12 35 –23 1 0.17
30  Madagascar 1 3 0 0 0 3 7 12 –5 0 0
31  Australia 1 2 0 0 0 2 2 8 –6 0 0
32  Venezuela 1 3 0 0 0 3 8 17 –9 0 0
33  Panama 1 3 0 0 0 3 4 14 –10 0 0
34  Thailand 1 2 0 0 0 2 3 13 –10 0 0
35  South Africa 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 15 –11 0 0
36  Ecuador 1 3 0 0 0 3 6 22 –16 0 0
37  Costa Rica 2 6 0 0 0 6 8 31 –23 0 0

Beach Soccer World Championships era (1995–2004)

This table shows the overall statistics of all 10 World Cups that occurred between 1995 and 2004, of the now defunct Beach Soccer World Championships era only.

Pos Team Apps Pld W W+ WP L GF GA Dif Pts Av. Pts
1  Brazil 10 50 48 0 0 2 422 123 +299 144 2.88
2  Portugal 8 35 23 1 0 11 177 119 +58 71 2.03
3  Uruguay 10 39 16 1 3 19 155 155 0 53 1.36
4  United States 9 33 15 0 0 18 112 138 –26 45 1.36
5  Spain 7 27 14 1 0 12 109 108 +1 44 1.63
6  Italy 10 36 12 0 1 23 128 183 –55 37 1.03
7  France 8 29 11 0 1 17 115 154 –39 34 1.17
8  Peru 5 21 11 0 0 9 81 78 +3 33 1.57
9  Argentina 8 30 10 0 0 20 82 122 –40 30 1
10  Japan 4 14 3 0 1 10 40 78 –38 10 0.71
11  England 1 5 2 0 0 3 20 31 –11 6 1.2
12  Canada 2 6 2 0 0 4 22 37 –15 6 1
13  Thailand 1 5 1 0 1 3 13 21 –8 4 0.8
14  Venezuela 2 5 1 0 0 4 14 16 –2 3 0.6
15  Russia 1 3 1 0 0 2 7 10 –3 3 1
16  Denmark 1 3 1 0 0 2 10 16 –6 3 1
17  Chile 1 4 1 0 0 3 14 22 –8 3 0.75
18   Switzerland 1 3 1 0 0 2 9 17 –8 3 1
19  Germany 4 9 1 0 0 8 22 56 –34 3 0.33
20  Turkey 1 2 0 0 0 2 1 5 –4 0 0
21  Malaysia 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 13 –9 0 0
22  South Africa 1 2 0 0 0 2 2 14 –12 0 0
23  Belgium 1 2 0 0 0 2 5 18 –13 0 0
24  Netherlands 1 3 0 0 0 3 7 30 –23 0 0

Awards (FIFA era)

The following documents the winners of the awards presented during the FIFA era of the World Cup. During the Beach Soccer World Championships era, only three awards were presented – to the top scorer, best player and best goalkeeper.

When FIFA acquired the tournament in 2005, the awards were expanded to honour the top three players in each of the existing categories (bar the best goalkeeper which remained a solo award) as well as recognition to the team with the most fair play points as standard in other FIFA competitions. Overall, eight awards are now presented.

Golden Ball

The adidas Golden Ball award is awarded to the player who plays the most outstanding football during the tournament. It is selected by the media poll.

World Cup Golden Ball Silver Ball Bronze Ball Ref(s)
2005 Brazil Portugal Madjer Brazil Neném Spain Amarelle [4]
2006 Brazil Portugal Madjer Brazil Benjamin Brazil Bruno [5]
2007 Brazil Brazil Buru Portugal Madjer Mexico Morgan Plata [6]
2008 France Spain Amarelle Brazil Benjamin Portugal Belchior [7]
2009 United Arab Emirates Switzerland Dejan Stankovic Portugal Madjer Brazil Benjamin [8]
2011 Italy Russia Ilya Leonov Brazil André El Salvador Frank Velasquez [9]
2013 Tahiti Brazil Bruno Xavier Japan Ozu Moreira French Polynesia Raimana Li Fung Kuee [10]
2015 Portugal French Polynesia Heimanu Philippe Taiarui Portugal Alan Portugal Madjer [11]
2017 Bahamas Iran Mohammad Ahmadzadeh Brazil Mauricinho Brazil Datinha [12]
2019 Paraguay

Golden Shoe

The adidas Golden Shoe is awarded to the topscorer of the tournament. If more than one players are equal by same goals, the players will be selected based by the most assists during the tournament.

World Cup Golden Shoe Goals Silver Shoe Goals Bronze Shoe Goals Ref(s)
2005 Brazil Portugal Madjer 12 Brazil Neném 9 France Anthony Mendy 8 [4]
2006 Brazil Portugal Madjer 21 Brazil Benjamin 12 Brazil Bruno 10 [5]
2007 Brazil Brazil Buru 10 Mexico Morgan Plata 9 Brazil Bruno 8 [6]
2008 France Portugal Madjer 13 Spain Amarelle 11 Portugal Belchior 10 [7]
2009 United Arab Emirates Switzerland Dejan Stankovic 16 Portugal Madjer 11 Brazil Buru 10 [8]
2011 Italy Brazil André 14 Portugal Madjer 12 El Salvador Frank Velásquez 9 [9]
2013 Tahiti Russia Dmitry Shishin 11 Brazil Bruno Xavier 10 El Salvador Agustín Ruiz 7 [10]
2015 Portugal Paraguay Pedro Moran 8 Portugal Madjer 8 Switzerland Noel Ott 8 [11]
2017 Bahamas Italy Gabriele Gori 17 Brazil Rodrigo 9 Iran Mohammad Ahmadzadeh 9 [12]
2019 Paraguay

Golden Glove

The Golden Glove Award is awarded to the best goalkeeper of the tournament.

World Cup Golden Glove Ref(s)
2008 France Spain Roberto Valeiro [7]
2009 United Arab Emirates Brazil Mão [8]
2011 Italy Russia Andrey Bukhlitskiy [9]
2013 Tahiti Spain Dona [10]
2015 Portugal French Polynesia Jonathan Torohia [11]
2017 Bahamas Iran Peyman Hosseini [12]
2019 Paraguay

FIFA Fair Play Award

FIFA Fair Play Award is given to the team who has the best fair play record during the tournament with the criteria set by FIFA Fair Play Committee.

Tournament FIFA Fair Play Award Ref(s)
2005 Brazil Japan Japan [4]
2006 Brazil France France [5]
2007 Brazil Brazil Brazil [6]
2008 France Russia Russia [7]
2009 United Arab Emirates Japan Japan & Russia Russia [8]
2011 Italy Nigeria Nigeria [9]
2013 Tahiti Russia Russia [10]
2015 Portugal Brazil Brazil [11]
2017 Bahamas Brazil Brazil [12]
2019 Paraguay

Top goalscorers

As of 2017

From the data available,[Note] the tables below document the all-time top goalscorers.

Sources:
1995–2001 (combined scorers), 1995–2002 (combined scorers), 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015, 2017

Notes:^
  • Note that the sources from 1995–2002 only list the players with the most goals from all those tournaments combined; players must of scored at least 10 goals overall to make the list; players with less goals are not listed. This means for players who subsequently scored enough goals to make the above all-time table, if they played between 1995–2002 and scored less than 10 goals, they would not have made the source lists and therefore any goals they did score during that time are a) unknown and b) missing from the above table (if they did score any).
  • Note that there are some discrepancies between FIFA's match reports and FIFA's top scorers lists for the same tournament.
  • During the early years of beach soccer, goals scored in a penalty shootout were often combined with goals scored during regulation time when the match score was documented – note that it is also possible such goals may have been counted in a player's goal tally in the sources.

Attendance figures

Note that attendance records are not available between 1995 and 2002.

Year Location Stadium capacity Matches Total gate Lowest gate Highest gate Average gate Attendance %dagger
2003 Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 6,000 16 74,700 2,000 6,000 4,669 78%
2004 Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 10,000 20 81,900 500 10,000 4,095 41%
2005 Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 10,000 20 110,500 500 10,000 5,525 55%
2006 Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 10,000 32 179,800 800 10,000 5,619 56%
2007 Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 10,000 32 157,300 1,000 10,000 5,525 49%
2008 France Marsielle, France 7,000 32 176,500 3,000§ 7,000 5,516 79%
2009 United Arab Emirates Dubai, United Arab Emirates 5,700double-dagger 32 97,500 150 5,700 3,047 63%
2011 Italy Ravenna, Italy 5,500 32 119,370 1,000 5,500 3,730 68%
2013 French Polynesia Papeete, Tahiti 4,200 32 109,650 1,100 4,200 3,427 82%
2015 Portugal Espinho, Portugal 3,500 32 96,300 1,600 3,500 3,009 86%
2017 The Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas 3,500 32 57,450 400 3,500 1,795 51%
Overall (2003–2017) 312 1,260,970 150 10,000 4,042 60%

Key:

  • § – from the attendance figures available; some are unrecorded
  • dagger – overall percentage matches were attended from the total possible maximum attendance figure if all matches were at full capacity: total gate / (stadium capacity x matches played)
  • double-dagger – two venues were used, the smaller with a capacity of 1,200 for 6 of the 32 matches which the lowest gate figure comes from

References

  1. ^ "Valcke : Beach soccer on the move". Fifa.com. Retrieved 2015-07-09.
  2. ^ [1] Archived March 22, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
  3. ^ "Amendments to the Beach Soccer Laws of the Game - 2014" (PDF). FIFA.com. 4 July 2014. Retrieved 25 August 2017.
  4. ^ a b c "FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Rio de Janeiro 2005". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 20 July 2015.
  5. ^ a b c "FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Rio de Janeiro 2006". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 20 July 2015.
  6. ^ a b c "FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Rio de Janeiro 2007". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 20 July 2015.
  7. ^ a b c d "FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Marseilles 2008". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 20 July 2015.
  8. ^ a b c d "FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Dubai 2009". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 20 July 2015.
  9. ^ a b c d "FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Ravenna/Italy 2011". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 20 July 2015.
  10. ^ a b c d "FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Tahiti 2013". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 20 July 2015.
  11. ^ a b c d "FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Dubai 2009". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 20 July 2015.
  12. ^ a b c d "FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Bahamas 2017 Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 30 May 2017.

External links

  • History at FIFA.com
  • The Beach Soccer Championships
  • RSSSF.com Beach Soccer Championships
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