Dunedin Central

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Dunedin Central was a parliamentary electorate in the city of Dunedin in Otago, New Zealand from 1881 to 1890 and 1905 to 1984.[1]

Population centres

The previous electoral redistribution was undertaken in 1875 for the 1875–76 election. In the six years since, New Zealand's European population had increased by 65%. In the 1881 electoral redistribution, the House of Representatives increased the number of European representatives to 91 (up from 84 since the 1875–76 election). The number of Māori electorates was held at four. The House further decided that electorates should not have more than one representative, which led to 35 new electorates being formed, including Dunedin Central, and two electorates that had previously been abolished to be recreated. This necessitated a major disruption to existing boundaries.[2][1]

History

Thomas Bracken, who at the 1879 election had unsuccessfully contested the City of Dunedin electorate, was the first representative.[3] At the 1884 election, Bracken was defeated by James Benn Bradshaw, but Bradshaw died during the term (on 1 September 1886) and Bracken won the resulting by-election. He served for the rest of the term and then retired.[3]

The 1887 election was contested by Edward Cargill and Frederick Fitchett,[4] and won by Fitchett.[5] Fitchett served one term and then retired.[6] The electorate was abolished at the end of the term in 1890.[1]

When the electorate was recreated for the 1905 election, the election was won by John A. Millar of the Liberal Party, who had represented various Dunedin electorates since 1893. At the next election in 1908, Millar successfully stood in the Dunedin West electorate.[7]

The Dunedin Central electorate was won by James Frederick Arnold in that year, who was also of the Liberal Party.[8] At the 1911 election, Arnold was beaten by Charles Statham.[9] Statham was a representative of the Reform Party, but became an Independent in 1919. Statham resigned after the 1914 election, after irregularities in the counting of the vote turned a 12-vote lead for his competitor James Munro into a 12-vote loss. Munro, who represented the United Labour Party, and Statham contested the resulting 1915 by-election, which was narrowly won by Statham. He continued to represent the electorate until his retirement in 1935.[10]

Peter Neilson of the Labour Party won the 1935 election. He served for three terms before he retired in 1946.[11] He was succeeded by Labour's Philip Connolly in the 1946 election, who served six terms before he retired.[12] Brian MacDonell of the Labour Party won the 1963 election and served seven terms until 1984, when the electorate was abolished.[13] MacDonell then failed to get selected by Labour for the Dunedin West electorate and then stood as an Independent, but he was unsuccessful.[citation needed]

Members of Parliament

The electorate was represented by nine Members of Parliament:[1]

Key

 Independent    Liberal    Liberal–Labour    Reform    Labour  

Election Winner
1881 election Thomas Bracken
1884 election James Benn Bradshaw
1886 by-election Thomas Bracken (2nd period)
1887 election Frederick Fitchett
(Electorate abolished 1890–1905)
1905 election John A. Millar
1908 election James Frederick Arnold
1911 election Charles Statham
1914 election
1915 by-election
1919 election
1922 election
1925 election
1928 election
1931 election
1935 election Peter Neilson
1938 election
1943 election
1946 election Philip Connolly
1949 election
1951 election
1954 election
1957 election
1960 election
1963 election Brian MacDonell
1966 election
1969 election
1972 election
1975 election
1978 election
1981 election
(Electorate abolished in 1984; see Dunedin West)

Election results

1981 election

General election, 1981: Dunedin Central[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Brian MacDonell 9,662 53.8 +3.6
National Nancy Ruth King 5,493 30.6
Social Credit D A Hood 2,798 15.6
Majority 4,169 23.2 +4.6
Turnout 20,626 87.0 +22.2

1978 election

General election, 1978: Dunedin Central[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Brian MacDonell 9,193 50.2 +3.8
National M B Ablett 5,780 31.6
Social Credit C Howard 2,649 14.5
Values Kathleen Dawson 685 3.7 -3.8
Majority 3,413 18.6 +10.6
Turnout 28,391 64.8 -16.6

1975 election

General election, 1975: Dunedin Central[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Brian MacDonell 8,352 46.4 -11.3
National Ian Bright 6,924 38.4
Values Kathleen Dawson 1,353 7.5
Social Credit Zorina Vujcich 1,327 7.4
Socialist Unity John Lindsay 32 0.2
Independent H Smith 13 0.1
Majority 1,428 8.0 -15.2
Turnout 22,282 81.4 -7.3

1972 election

General election, 1972: Dunedin Central[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Brian MacDonell 9,378 57.7 +1.8
National Frederick Arthur O'Neill 5,607 34.5
Social Credit Colin Aberdeen 1,058 6.5 -2.4
New Democratic C J Murphy 119 0.7
Socialist Unity J L Marston 105 0.6
Majority 3,771 23.2 +0.1
Turnout 18,545 88.7 +0.7

1969 election

General election, 1969: Dunedin Central[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Brian MacDonell 9,565 55.9 +6.3
National M M Reichwein 5,616 32.8
Social Credit Colin Aberdeen 1,515 8.9 -1.9
Phoenix Party Gerald Williams 418 2.4
Majority 3,949 23.1 +15.1
Turnout 19,433 88.0 +1.0

1966 election

General election, 1966: Dunedin Central[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Brian MacDonell 7,557 48.6 ±0.0
National J E Farry 6,312 40.6
Social Credit Colin Aberdeen 1,687 10.8 +1.2
Majority 1,245 8.0 +0.6
Turnout 17,979 87.0 -2.6

1963 election

General election, 1963: Dunedin Central[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Brian MacDonell 7,639 48.6
National G R Thorn 6,469 41.2
Social Credit Colin Aberdeen 1,499 9.6 +3.2
Communist J L Marston 96 0.6
Majority 1,170 7.4
Turnout 17,604 89.6 -0.2

1960 election

General election, 1960: Dunedin Central[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Philip Connolly 7,175 48.1 -4.9
National Norman Scurr 6,333 42.4
Social Credit Colin Aberdeen 951 6.4
Independent Warrington Taylor 471 3.1
Majority 842 5.7 -5.8
Turnout 16,715 89.8 -2.8

1957 election

General election, 1957: Dunedin Central[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Philip Connolly 8,241 53.0 +10.3
National Marcus Anderson 6,463 41.5 -4.6
Social Credit Mary King 850 5.5 -11.6
Majority 1,778 11.5 +9.0
Turnout 16,885 92.6 +0.3

1954 election

General election, 1954: Dunedin Central[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Philip Connolly 5,784 42.7 -8.8
National Marcus Anderson 5,824 46.1
Social Credit Mary King 2,320 17.1
Majority 330 2.5 -0.5
Turnout 14,802 92.3 +2.6

1951 election

General election, 1951: Dunedin Central[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Philip Connolly 6,321 51.5 -2.4
National Walter MacDougall 5,858 48.5
Majority 373 3.0 -4.8
Turnout 13,494 89.7 -4.2

1949 election

General election, 1949: Dunedin Central[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Philip Connolly 6,813 53.9 -3.6
National David Murdoch 5,824 46.1
Majority 989 7.8 -7.2
Turnout 13,527 93.9 +0.2

1946 election

General election, 1946: Dunedin Central[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Philip Connolly 7,633 57.5
National Stuart Sidey 5,633 42.5
Majority 2,000 15.0
Turnout 14,179 93.7

1931 election

General election, 1931: Dunedin Central[18][19][20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Charles Statham 5,389 51.25
Labour Peter Neilson 5,127 48.75
Majority 262 2.49
Informal votes 21 0.20
Turnout 10,537 85.79
Registered electors 12,283

1915 by-election

Dunedin Central by-election, 1915[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Reform Charles Statham 4,033 50.67 +0.59
United Labour James Wright Munro 3,926 49.33 -0.62
Informal votes 11 0.13 -2.53
Majority 107 1.34 +1.18
Turnout 7,959 84.55 +2.97

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Wilson 1985, pp. 261–262.
  2. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 43–48.
  3. ^ a b Wilson 1985, p. 185.
  4. ^ "The General Elections: City Nominations". Otago Daily Times (7982). 21 September 1887. p. 2. Retrieved 9 June 2012. 
  5. ^ "The General Election, 1887". National Library. 1887. p. 3. Retrieved 25 February 2012. 
  6. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 196.
  7. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 220.
  8. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 180.
  9. ^ Wilson 1985, pp. 180, 236.
  10. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 236.
  11. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 223.
  12. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 190.
  13. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 190, 261–262.
  14. ^ a b c d Norton 1988, p. 213.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g Norton 1988, p. 212.
  16. ^ "The General Election, 1949". National Library. 1950. pp. 1–5, 8. Retrieved 3 January 2014. 
  17. ^ "The General Election, 1946". National Library. 1947. pp. 1–11, 14. Retrieved 1 January 2014. 
  18. ^ The General Election, 1931. Government Printer. 1932. p. 2. Retrieved 2 November 2014. 
  19. ^ "Elections Recounts". The Evening Post. CXII (142). 12 December 1931. p. 10. Retrieved 29 January 2014. 
  20. ^ "Prospects in Otago". The New Zealand Herald. LXVIII (21037). 23 November 1931. p. 11. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
  21. ^ Hislop, J. (1915). The General Election, 1914. National Library. pp. 1–33. Retrieved 1 August 2013. 

References

  • McRobie, Alan (1989). Electoral Atlas of New Zealand. Wellington: GP Books. ISBN 0-477-01384-8. 
  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First published in 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103. 
  • Norton, Clifford (1988). New Zealand Parliamentary Election Results 1946–1987: Occasional Publications No 1, Department of Political Science. Wellington: Victoria University of Wellington. ISBN 0-475-11200-8. 
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