Dubbo railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Dubbo
Dubbo NSW 2830, Australia - panoramio (31).jpg
Location Talbragar Street, Dubbo, Dubbo Regional Council, New South Wales
Australia
Coordinates 32°14′41″S 148°36′34″E / 32.2448°S 148.6095°E / -32.2448; 148.6095Coordinates: 32°14′41″S 148°36′34″E / 32.2448°S 148.6095°E / -32.2448; 148.6095
Owned by RailCorp
Operated by NSW TrainLink
Line(s)
Distance 462.20 km (287.20 mi) from Central
Platforms 1
Tracks 2
Construction
Structure type Ground
Disabled access Yes
Other information
Station code DBO
History
Opened 1 February 1881
Services
Preceding station   NSW TrainLink   Following station
Terminus NSW TrainLink Western
Dubbo XPT
towards Sydney
Official name Dubbo Railway Station and yard group
Type State heritage (complex / group)
Designated 2 April 1999
Reference no. 1130
Type Railway Platform/ Station
Category Transport - Rail
Architect John Whitton (attributed)
Location
New South Wales

The Dubbo railway station is an heritage-listed railway station and bus interchange located on the Main Western line in Dubbo in the Dubbo Regional Council local government area of New South Wales, Australia. The station serves the city of Dubbo and was opened on 1 February 1881.[1] The station is also known as Dubbo Railway Station and yard group. The property is owned by RailCorp, an agency of the Government of New South Wales and was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.[2] The station and associated yards were designed by the office of the Engineer-in-Chief of the NSW Government Railways, under the direction of John Whitton.[3]

Dubbo was a major railway centre, being the junction for the Main Western, Molong-Dubbo and Coonamble lines and maintaining a sizeable locomotive depot. Dubbo was the limit for heavier 36, 38 and 60 class locomotives, with smaller locomotives taking over for journeys further west.[4][5] The station previously had a bay platform, which was removed in August 1988.[6] Rail services east from Central Sydney terminate at Dubbo and there are now services by coaches to the north west.

Services

Dubbo was served by the Western Mail from Central Sydney until services ceased in November 1988.[7][8] At Dubbo it connected with the Far West Express to Bourke, Cobar and Coonamble.[9]

In September 1975, the Public Transport Commission introduced six Denning coaches to replace all train services north and west from Dubbo.[10]

Today Dubbo is served by NSW TrainLink's daily Central West XPT service operating to and from Central Sydney.[11] NSW TrainLink also operate road coach services from Dubbo to Lithgow, Cootamundra, Broken Hill, Bourke, Nyngan and Lightning Ridge.[11][12]

Platform Line Stopping pattern Notes
1 services to Sydney Central

History

Eastbound view of the platform

Most of the stone structures comprising Dubbo Railway Station were built between 1879 and 1881 in preparation for its opening in 1881. The station master's residence was completed that same year. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries some additions were made to the precinct, including:[2]

  • 1891 construction of the lamp room and wool stage;
  • 1893 Dubbo West rail siding;
  • 1897 carriage shed;
  • 1898 the western end platform extension;
  • 1893 opening of the Dubbo-Coonamble rail line;
  • 1904 installation of a 20-tonne (22-short-ton) cart weighbridge and extensions to the Sydney end of the platform;
  • 1908 grain shed.

Numerous additions and alterations were made in the first two decades of the early 20th century, decreasing in frequency into the 1930s and 1940s.[2]

By 1975 passenger services to Bourke, Cobar and Coonamble were replaced by a road coach services connecting with the trains at Dubbo Railway Station.[2]

The 1980s saw demolition of several by-then anacrhonistic structural elements including the municipal gas siding, the livestock loading facility, the Darling Street gate house and the Institute Hall (relocated elsewhere). In 1988 the Dubbo-Molong line was decommissioned in 1988.[2]

Dubbo Railway Station remains an operational station on the western line, operated by RailCorp, although the station master's residence is now in private ownership.[2][13]:13

Description

Buildings

The station building is a type 5 stone first class station building, erected in 1881, with platform awnings cantilevered via brackets on steel posts. The station contained a railway refreshment room accommodation, also completed in stone in 1881.[14] There are two adjacent residences, the station master's house located at Talbragar Street,[15] being a type 4 building, completed in 1881 in stone; and at 106 Darling Street, being a type 11 building in stone, originally used as a locomotive straight shed.[2][16]

Structures

The railway station platform faces were completed in 1881 in stone; and the location pump house was completed in corrugated iron, attached to the bridge, and completed c. 1881.[2]

Modifications and dates

  • 1879-81 most of the stone structures of the station built in preparation for its 1881 opening. Station master's residence built 1881.[2]
  • 1891 lamp room and wool stage built
  • 1893 Dubbo West siding added
  • 1896-1900 removal shop front (and rear?) at No 73
  • 1897 carriage shed added
  • 1898 western end platform extension made[2]
  • 1903 Dubbo-Coonamble line opens this year.
  • 1904 installation of 20-tonne (22-short-ton) cart weighbridge and extensions to Sydney end of the platform.
  • 1906 addition of a transhipping shed
  • 1908 grain shed added.[2]

In the first two decades of the 20th century numerous additions and alterations were made, decreasing in frequency into the 1930s and 1940s.[2] By 1975 passenger services to Bourke, Cobar and Coonamble were replaced by a road coach service, connecting with trains at Dubbo.[2] The 1980s saw demolition of several by-then anachronistic structural elements including the municipal gas siding, livestock loading facility, Darling Street gate house and Institute Hall (relocated). In 1988 the Dubbo-Molong line was decommissioned.[2] In 2015 the Dubbo railway station was an operational rail station on the western line only, although the residence at 106 Darling Street is now in private ownership.[2][13]:12–13

Heritage listing

Dubbo station and residences is one of the few groups of buildings on the NSW system constructed in stone and one of the very few stone first class railway stations built. The surviving stone platform faces are rare and of high significance. The site is of high significance as it is situated adjacent to some excellent early industrial buildings used in relation to the railway and the railway hotel. The group is an important element in the townscape of Dubbo which is an historic centre which relies on tourism and its historic theme. The whole of the railway station group is of very high significance to the development and history of Dubbo and the railway system.Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. The Heritage Division intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available.[2]

Dubbo railway station was listed on the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999 having satisfied the following criteria.[2]

The place possesses uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of the cultural or natural history of New South Wales.

This item is assessed as historically rare. This item is assessed as scientifically rare. This item is assessed as archaeologically rare. This item is assessed as socially rare.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Dubbo Station NSWrail.net
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Dubbo Railway Station and yards group". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01130. Retrieved 2 June 2018.
  3. ^ "Dubbo Railway Precinct". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  4. ^ "Byways of Steam: Dubbo (Part 1)". Roundhouse: 4–28. October 1985.
  5. ^ "Byways of Steam: Dubbo (Part 2)". Roundhouse: 4–14. January 1986.
  6. ^ "Signalling & Safeworking". Railway Digest: 382. October 1988.
  7. ^ "Last Passengers" Railway Digest January 1989 page 20
  8. ^ "The Last Post for the Last Mail" Railway Digest February 1989 page 53
  9. ^ Cooke, David (1984). Railmotors and XPTs. Australian Railway Historical Society NSW Division. ISBN 0-909650-23-3.
  10. ^ "State Rail Coach Services - The Vehicles". Australian Bus Panorama. 9 (3). October 1993.
  11. ^ a b "Western timetable" (PDF). NSW Trainlink. 30 September 2018.
  12. ^ "Southern timetable" (PDF). NSW Trainlink. 30 September 2018.
  13. ^ a b OzArk Environmental & Heritage Management P/L (2015). Statement of Heritage Impact: Dubbo Station Interchange Upgrade.
  14. ^ Lot 200/DP1165856
  15. ^ Lot 2/DP 1006205
  16. ^ Lot 4/DP 1006205

Bibliography

  • Cottee, J. M. (2004). Stations on the track: selected New South Wales country railway stations: an historical overview.
  • OzArk Environmental & Heritage Management P/L (2015). Statement of Heritage Impact: Dubbo Station Interchange Upgrade.

Attribution

  • CC-BY-icon-80x15.png This Wikipedia article contains material from Dubbo Railway Station and yard group, entry number 01130 in the New South Wales State Heritage Register published by the State of New South Wales and Office of Environment and Heritage 2018 under CC-BY 4.0 licence, accessed on 2 June 2018.
  • CC-BY-icon-80x15.png This Wikipedia article contains material from Dubbo Railway Precinct, entry number SRA342 in the New South Wales State Heritage Register published by the State of New South Wales and Office of Environment and Heritage 2018 under CC-BY 4.0 licence, accessed on 22 June 2018.

External links

  • Media related to Dubbo railway station at Wikimedia Commons
  • Dubbo station details Transport for New South Wales
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Dubbo_railway_station&oldid=871351731"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubbo_railway_station
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Dubbo railway station"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA